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Douglas Adams

Douglas Adams
Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. Adams also wrote Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (1987) and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (1988), and co-wrote The Meaning of Liff (1983), The Deeper Meaning of Liff (1990), Last Chance to See (1990), and three stories for the television series Doctor Who. A posthumous collection of his work, including an unfinished novel, was published as The Salmon of Doubt in 2002. Adams became known as an advocate for environmentalism and conservation, and also as a lover of fast cars, cameras, technological innovation, and the Apple Macintosh. He was a staunch atheist, imagining a sentient puddle who wakes up one morning and thinks, "This is an interesting world I find myself in—an interesting hole I find myself in—fits me rather neatly, doesn't it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!" Early life[edit] Education[edit] Career[edit] Writing[edit]

H. G. Wells Herbert George "H. G." Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946)[3] was an English writer, now best known for his work in the science fiction genre. Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context.[5] He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. Early life[edit] A defining incident of young Wells's life was an accident in 1874 that left him bedridden with a broken leg.[3] To pass the time he started reading books from the local library, brought to him by his father. No longer able to support themselves financially, the family instead sought to place their sons as apprentices in various occupations. Teacher[edit] H. H. He soon entered the Debating Society of the school. During 1888 H. Upon leaving the Normal School of Science, Wells was left without a source of income.

Bram Stoker Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Early life[edit] Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799–1876), from Dublin, and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818–1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there. Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Early career[edit] Lyceum Theatre[edit]

Eric Van Lustbader - Thrillers The Saxon Stories The following novels are now available: Style[edit] The series is frequently compared to The Warlord Chronicles, not only because of similarities between the two protagonists (both were orphaned), but also in the similarities between the foreign menace in the form of the Danes in The Saxon Stories and the Saxons in The Warlord Chronicles. Alfred also resembles Arthur in his mission as the only man to save his kingdom (England for Alfred, Southern Celtic Britain for Arthur) from an unstoppable threat. The main character, Uhtred of Bebbanburg (the old Saxon name of Bamburgh Castle), is an old man telling tales of events that took place decades earlier, starting from his childhood and going on, his story intertwining with the story of the British Isles in the end of the ninth century. He intersperses the narrative with often-acerbic comments regarding the events and characters he describes. References[edit] See also[edit] Anglo-Saxon warfare

Ian Livingstone Early life[edit] Livingstone attended Altrincham Grammar School for Boys, where he earned (he claims) only one A level, in Geography. He has retained his close links with the school and has visited it on numerous occasions, including to donate money for a refurbishment of the ICT suite, and also to give a speech and present awards to GCSE recipients in 1998. Career[edit] Games Workshop[edit] In 1980, Livingstone and Jackson began to develop the concept of the Fighting Fantasy gamebook series, the first volume of which (The Warlock of Firetop Mountain) was published in 1982 by Puffin Books (a subsidiary imprint of Penguin Books).[2]:46 Livingstone and Jackson sold Games Workshop in 1991 for £10 million.[4] The pair, together with Bryan Ansell, founded Citadel Miniatures in Newark to make miniatures for games. Fighting Fantasy[edit] Videogame industry[edit] Skills Champion[edit] Awards[edit] In 2011, Livingstone received an Honorary Doctorate of Arts from Bournemouth University.[13][14]

Hermann Hesse Biography[edit] Family background[edit] Hermann Hesse was born on 2 July 1877 in the Black Forest town of Calw in Württemberg, German Empire. Hesse's birthplace, 2007 Hesse's father, Johannes Hesse, the son of a doctor, was born in 1847 in the Estonian town of Paide (Weissenstein). Hesse grew up in a Swabian Pietist household, with the Pietist tendency to insulate believers into small, deeply thoughtful groups. Childhood[edit] From childhood, Hesse appeared headstrong and hard for his family to handle. St. Hesse showed signs of serious depression as early as his first year at school.[6] In his juvenilia collection Gerbersau, Hesse vividly describes experiences and anecdotes from his childhood and youth in Calw: the atmosphere and adventures by the river, the bridge, the chapel, the houses leaning closely together, hidden nooks and crannies, as well as the inhabitants with their admirable qualities, their oddities, and their idiosyncrasies. Education[edit] Becoming a writer[edit]

Bernard Cornwell Biography[edit] Cornwell was born in London in 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force. He was adopted and brought up in Thundersley, Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict sect who were pacifists, banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. After he left them, he changed his name to his mother's maiden name, Cornwell. Cornwell was sent to Monkton Combe School. Career[edit] As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C. Cornwell and wife Judy co-wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym "Susannah Kells". In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen's 80th Birthday Honours List.[7] Novel series[edit] The Sharpe stories[edit] Cornwell's best known books feature the adventures of Richard Sharpe, an English soldier during the Napoleonic Wars. The Warlord Chronicles[edit] The Grail Quest novels[edit] The Saxon Stories[edit]

The Warlord Chronicles The Warlord Chronicles is a trilogy of books about Arthurian Britain written by Bernard Cornwell. The story is written as a mixture of historical fiction and Arthurian mythology. The books have been published by Penguin and Michael Joseph in the United Kingdom and by St Martin's Press in the United States, in hardcover and paperback editions, each with different ISBNs. Books in the trilogy[edit] Treatment of legend and history[edit] Once upon a time, in a land that was called Britain, these things happened ... well, maybe. Like other "historical" takes on the Arthurian legends, the series postulates that Post-Roman Britain was a difficult time for the native Britons, being threatened by invasion from the Anglo-Saxons in the East and raids from the Irish in the West. The story is written as if it took place in Dark Age Britain as described in the original Welsh legends, with appropriate types of technology, culture, warfare, and attitudes. [edit] Other editions[edit] References[edit]

Luis Fernando Verissimo Origem: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre. Luis Fernando Verissimo (Porto Alegre, 26 de setembro de 1936) é um escritor brasileiro. Mais conhecido por suas crônicas e textos de humor, mais precisamente de sátiras de costumes, publicados diariamente em vários jornais brasileiros, Verissimo é também cartunista e tradutor, além de roteirista de televisão, autor de teatro e romancista bissexto. Biografia[editar | editar código-fonte] Formação[editar | editar código-fonte] Nascido em Porto Alegre, Luis Fernando viveu parte de sua infância e adolescência nos Estados Unidos, com a família, em função de compromissos profissionais assumidos por seu pai - professor na Universidade de Berkeley (1943-1945) e diretor cultural da União Pan-americana em Washington (1953-1956). Aos 14 anos produziu, com a irmã Clarissa e um primo, um jornal periódico com notícias da família, que era pendurado no banheiro de casa e se chamava "O Patentino" (patente é como é conhecida a privada no Rio Grande do Sul).

J. R. R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE (/ˈtɒlkiːn/ TOL-keen;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. In 2008, The Times ranked him sixth on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".[7] Forbes ranked him the 5th top-earning "dead celebrity" in 2009.[8] Biography Family origins Most of Tolkien's paternal ancestors were craftsmen. Childhood 1892 Christmas card with a coloured photo of the Tolkien family in Bloemfontein, sent to relatives in Birmingham, England He could read by the age of four and could write fluently soon afterwards.

José Saramago More than two million copies of Saramago's books have been sold in Portugal alone and his work has been translated into 25 languages.[3][4] A proponent of libertarian communism,[5] Saramago was criticized by institutions such as the Catholic Church, the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, with whom he disagreed on various issues. An atheist, he defended love as an instrument to improve the human condition. In 1992, the Government of Portugal under Prime Minister Aníbal Cavaco Silva ordered the removal of The Gospel According to Jesus Christ from the Aristeion Prize's shortlist, claiming the work was religiously offensive. Disheartened by this political censorship of his work,[6] Saramago went into exile on the Spanish island of Lanzarote, upon which he resided until his death in 2010.[7][8] Saramago was a founding member of the National Front for the Defence of Culture in Lisbon in 1992, and co-founder with Orhan Pamuk, of the European Writers' Parliament (EWP).

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