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Immaterials: Light painting WiFi

Immaterials: Light painting WiFi
The city is filled with an invisible landscape of networks that is becoming an interwoven part of daily life. WiFi networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile phones are starting to influence how urban environments are experienced and understood. We want to explore and reveal what the immaterial terrain of WiFi looks like and how it relates to the city. Immaterials: light painting WiFi film by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen and Einar Sneve Martinussen. This film is about investigating and contextualising WiFi networks through visualisation. It is made by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen, Einar Sneve Martinussen. Investigating WiFi In order to study the spatial and material qualities of wireless networks, we built a WiFi measuring rod that visualises WiFi signal strength as a bar of lights. WiFi outside the Oslo School of Architecture and Design The measuring rod is inspired by the poles land surveyors use to map and describe the physical landscape. Walking with the WiFi measuring rod. Conclusions

http://yourban.no/2011/02/22/immaterials-light-painting-wifi/

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"investigating and contextualising WiFi networks through visualisation" by agnesdelmotte Mar 9

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