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Tutorial: Fabric Bucket/Basket

Tutorial: Fabric Bucket/Basket
It’s been a long week! I meant to post this sooner, but other things kept getting in the way. Better late than never? Anyhow, please read through the entire tutorial before you start. I will have a few tips at the end, that may help you to make decisions on the materials that you use. This bucket/basket (I will refer to it as a bucket as we go through) is approximately 8″ wide x 6″ deep x 6″tall. Materials: Approx. 1/2 yd each – fabric for outside and fabric for liner Batting – 1/2 yd in length (please see notes at the end) Matching thread for assembly (you can use a contrasting thread for final top stitching if you choose) graph paper (or your choice of material to draw a pattern out on – see notes at the end) ruler pencil pins walking foot for machine (not required, but it makes it a lot easier to sew with the batting) First I am going to show you how to draw out a pattern. Pattern Drawn Out I start out drawing out what will be the base of the bucket first. Side Ends Batting, lining & outside Related:  bagsBaskets and Bins

Tutorial ~ Hanging Fabric Baskets Or Pockets I know I say this every time, but I am so excited about this project! The possibilities are endless! And they are so easy – I am going to have baskets hanging all around my house in a weeks time. I am using these above my sewing desk to hold all my notions and patterns. Here is the tutorial for making larger baskets with plexiglass in the bottom for great wall storage. Supplies: Fabric – how much you need depends on how big and how many you make, we’ll go over thisHeavy weight interface lining – you want it stiff enough to hold its shapeAll your sewing stuffCurtain rod or wooden dowel with brackets to hang it on Cutting out fabric: To make one basket you need two pieces identical in size. Large pocket: 12 inches wide and 20 inches long.Smaller basket: 8 inches wide and 14 inches long, one only 12 inches long.Smallest basket: 7 inches wide and 12 inches long.Scrap pieces for the part you will use to hang them from, we’ll talk about these later Now sew the corners shut like shown.

No-interfacing Storage Basket Tutorial As promised, a recipe for making washable stand-up storage baskets: You'll need to cut 2 of each of these pieces (click on the pic to enlarge it to a readable size). The measurements are in centimetres because that's the way I was brought up (sorry). A seam allowance of 1cm is included in these measurements. This basket's base is 15cm wide, but you could make any size using this slightly haphazard formula, where x is the width of the base and y is the height of the basket. And 2 is cm and seam allowance. Pieces cut, sew right sides together along these seams: Sew the boxed corners of the linings by folding the pieces open, matching the side seams with the bottom seams, and stitching across: Zig-zag the top edge of the smaller lining piece. Hem the bottom edge of the outer sleeve piece, turning up 1cm all round and stitching it down. Turn the lining pieces so that their right side faces out, and slide the outer sleeve over. Almost done, except for the fiddly part!

Travel Accessories: Plenty of Pockets Tote When you're on the road, doesn't it always seems to be the ordinary, everyday things you are suddenly in desperate need of: gum, nail clippers, your headphones? I get a little panicky, certain I've left behind the most obvious items... as if perhaps I'm on an arctic expedition and won't see civilization for weeks. But the opportunity for replenishment doesn't matter; I want my stuff close at hand. We offer a full set of pattern downloads below for the tote body as well as all the pockets. We recommend using a twin needle to do the decorative stitching on this project. Our tote uses a heavy, solid-color duck for the exterior, a fabric that is readily available at numerous outlets, including this pretty 7 oz. duck in brown from Fabric. com. The finished size of the tote is approximately 12½" tall x 11½" wide with 2" deep sides and base. Sew the 1½" button to the center top of the tote front opposite the button loop. Contributors Storage Solutions Related Articles

Pleated tote (beach bag) tutorial Before we went away, I decided that a new bag for the beach was a must – something big and roomy to hold books, magazines, sunscreen, hats, and all that other good stuff. So I made this big pleated tote, and it worked perfectly. This is a picture of it in action: And here’s a little tutorial in case you want to make one for yourself – doesn’t have to be for the beach either, it could come in handy for schlepping all kinds of things around town. Here’s what you need: two pieces of your main fabric cut in shape A four pieces of the top shape (B) in a contrasting fabric two pieces of a lining fabric in shape C one piece of the long rectangle for the strap in the contrasting fabric two pieces of the top shapes (B) and one of the strap in a medium weight interfacing 1) Along the longest (22″) edge of the main fabric pieces, mark along the top at the following intervals: 3″ – 4″ – 6″ – 7″ – 9″ – 10″ – 12″ – 13″ – 15″ – 16″ – 18″ – 19″ 13) And voila, this is what it should look like.

notes from Terry Ann: Woven Fabric Basket I had fun last weekend making some little woven baskets out of 2-1/2" batik strips. These baskets are often made out of paper such as magazines, newspaper, maps, potato chip bags etc. but I wanted to use fabric. I used interfacing to stiffen the strips and make them easy to weave. Materials needed: 20 strips 2-1/2" x 21" (I used precut batik strips) Note: One Bali Pop makes four baskets. 40 strips 1/2" x 20" (1/3 yd.) 20 strips 1/2" x 20" (5/8 yd.) Fabric glue, wonder clips or clothespins, scissors, thread Prepare 20 Fabric Strips: 1. 2. 3. 4. Weave strips together - 10 vertical strips and 10 horizontal strips. On each side, weave the first 5 strips into the last five strips to make a diamond shape as shown. Continue weaving to connect the sides. Pull the strips to tighten and fold the strips down. Weave the ends in on the inside of the basket. Put a dab of glue between the layers along the top edge. Here are some resources showing how to make these baskets out of paper: map basket

renske’s minimalist tote bag A talented seamstress with a mission, Renske Solkesz decided to create her own wardrobe after finding herself frustrated with high fashion prices. When we saw her chic and modern wardrobe creations, we asked if she’d be willing to create and share a fun accessory tutorial with us. I’m super excited about what she’s come up with: an amazing self-closing utilitarian tote! I’m a huge fan of the graphic contrast and the leather and rivet details. Like her fashion designs, this tote is made from inexpensive materials, yet looks totally luxe. I’m halfway out the door to the fabric store already! CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump! When I designed this bag, I wanted to integrate the grip/straps in a more functional way with the rest of the bag. A friend of mine called it a “yin yang bag,” which is pretty accurate, I think. Materials Tools HammerSewing machineScissorsPinsChalkMeasuring tapeIronPattern template Instructions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Finished!

Neck tie School Bag Got lots of neck ties lying around? Use them to make this unique bag! What you need Okay, you'll need a bunch of ties. Mine are all paisleys. A lot of lining fabric - mine is black velveteen. Instructions Let’s start with the gusset/handle: you’ll need four ties: (Figure 1) Lay them out like this. Join each pair side by side with a super-wide triple zigzag stitch. (Figure 2) Just feed the ties through side by side, no “right sides together” or pinning or anything. Stitch each pair together side by side halfway up. (Figure3 ) Now you have have two pairs of ties sewn together. Just do another triple zigzag over the center of each tie following the center seam on the wrong side. (Figure 4) Now place the fat ends of the ties right sides together and stitch across with a regular straight stitch. Your gusset/strap piece is now complete! Now we are going to make the pattern for the front and back of the bag. (Figure 5) Now mark a dot at the inside points between the ties. (Figure 6) (Figure 7) (Figure 8)

Scalloped Edge Basket Tutorial Sherri from Thread Riding Hood designed these little baskets, complete with a PDF pattern and full tutorial! They’re perfect for gift-giving, for organizing and we also think they’d make lovely little Easter baskets. Learn more about Sherri in her introduction, and have fun with the baskets! Hi, I’m Sherri from Thread Riding Hood and I’m happy to be here to share this tutorial with you! Your favorite fat quarters can be used to create this pretty zakka-inspired basket. Materials: 1 Fat Quarter ** – Basket Outer *1 Fat Quarter ** – Basket Lining + Scalloped Edge * 4” Square – Outer Base Fabric * 4” Square – Lining Base Fabric * 6”x 12” – Handle Fabric * (optional) ½ yard – Medium Weight Fusible Interfacing (20” wide) 1 Fat Quarter – Low Loft Quilt Batting School Glue Stick OR Basting Spray Ruler, Removable Fabric Marker, Other usual Sewing Supplies Scalloped Edge Basket PDF Pattern Pieces * Quilting cotton is recommended for all fabrics. ** Fabric measurements are generous. Cutting: 2. 3. 5.

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