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70+ book picks from TED speakers and attendees

70+ book picks from TED speakers and attendees
The tables in bookstores can be overwhelming: Every book cover looks appealing, every blurb glows with praise. Sometimes, you just need a recommendation from a human, someone you trust. Below, 10 members of the TED community — with very different points of view — share the books they think you’ll enjoy this summer. Their selections are wonderfully untethered to new releases and bestsellers, with a little something for everyone. Mind-bending fiction, picked by David Eagleman David Eagleman is a neuroscientist whose sensory vest may just expand the limits of human perception. Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges. The Bear by William Faulkner. The Most Human Human: What Artificial Intelligence Teaches Us About Being Alive by Brian Christian. The Arrival by Shaun Tan. Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon. Last and First Men by Olaf Stapledon. Things That Are: Essays by Amy Leach. Books on art and race, picked by Anne Pasternak

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Related:  TED talksSo many books, so little time...To ReadLITERATURE

21 Short Videos Worth More Than an MBA If you're determined to get a job that requires an MBA, by all means spend the time and money to get one. However, if you want to know more about business than 99.9 percent of your colleagues, you can spend a day watching these TED Talks. Motivation 1. Why we do what we do Tony Robbins discusses the invisible forces that make us do what we do and how to use them to your advantage. The 25 Best Tumblr Accounts for Book Nerds Tumblr has built itself as the center of a large creative community. You can find graphic artists, hilarious GIFs and talented musicians sharing their work. It’s also home to countless readers, writers and book lovers. If you’re a true bibliophile, Tumblr has lots of blogs to feed your love of the written word.

While Some Are Shocked by ‘Go Set a Watchman,’ Others Find Nuance in a Bigoted Atticus Finch “Whether you’ve read the novel or seen the film, there’s this image you have of Atticus as a hero, and this brings him down a peg,” said Adam Bergstein, an English teacher in Queens whose 10th- and 11-grade students read “Mockingbird.” “How do you take this guy who everybody looked up to for the last 50-plus years, and now he’s a more flawed individual?” In this version, Atticus is 72 years old, suffering from arthritis and stubbornly resistant to social change. He stands in sharp contrast to the gentle scholar in “Mockingbird,” who tells Scout, when explaining why he has gone out on a limb to defend a black man, that “I do my best to love everybody.” In “Watchman,” which comes out Tuesday, Atticus chides Scout for her idealistic views about racial equality: “The Negroes down here are still in their childhood as a people.” After the initial shock, some writers and literary critics see added value in a more complex, and flawed, version of Atticus.

FREE BOOKS: 100 Legal Sites To Download Literature Looking for the next great book to sink your teeth into? Look no further. Below are over 100 links to websites that provide free e-books on a huge variety of topics. Browse works by Mark Twain, Joseph Conrad and other famous authors here. 1. An Update on Ken Wilber's Health Ken Wilber April 14th, 2013 Your rating: None Average: 5 (6 votes) Over the past few years there has been a tremendous outpouring of compassion and concern from the integral community for Ken Wilber's wellbeing. As many people know, Ken has been dealing with some health-related challenges in recent years that have impacted his ability to show up for public appearances, and worse, has forced him to take a brief sabbatical from his writing. In this clip from his 2012 What Next keynote address, Ken offers us a brief update about his health and makes an incredibly exciting announcement:

10 talks you won't be able to stop thinking about Now playing Here's a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power? Watch as psychologist Steven Pinker is gradually, brilliantly persuaded by philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein that reason is actually the key driver of human moral progress, even if its effect sometimes takes generations to unfold. The Greatest Books of All Time, As Voted by 125 Famous Authors by Maria Popova Why Tolstoy is 11.6% better than Shakespeare. “Reading is the nourishment that lets you do interesting work,” Jennifer Egan once said. This intersection of reading and writing is both a necessary bi-directional life skill for us mere mortals and a secret of iconic writers’ success, as bespoken by their personal libraries.

My hero: Mary Shelley by Neil Gaiman The cold, wet summer of 1816, a night of ghost stories and a challenge allowed a young woman to delineate the darkness, and give us a way of looking at the world. They were in a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva: Lord Byron – the bestselling poet, too dangerous for the drawing rooms of England and in exile; his doctor, John William Polidori; Percy Shelley, poet and atheist, and his soon-to-be wife, 18-year-old Mary Shelley. Ghost stories were read, and then Byron challenged everyone in the group to come up with a new story. He started, but did not finish, one about vampires; Polidori completed "The Vampyre"; and young Mary, already the mother of a living child and a dead one, imagined a story about a man who fabricated a living creature, a monster, and brought it to life.

The London Beckett Seminar 2015-16 The London Beckett Seminar at the Institute of English Studies will bring together national and international scholars, researchers and postgraduates to discuss issues arising from the prose, theatre and poetry of Samuel Beckett that pertain to aspects of literary, philosophical and historical analysis with particular attention to translation studies, performance and practice, digital humanities and visual cultures. Inherently interdisciplinary in approach, the seminar will establish a vibrant research network for postgraduate students, early-career researchers, and established academics on a national and international level. Seminar Schedule Conveners Dr Derval Tubridy is Dean of the Graduate School, Associate Pro-Warden for Research and Enterprise at Goldsmiths, University of London. Mr Stefano Rosignoli holds degrees in Modern Literature and Publishing, and is a PhD candidate at the Institute of English Studies.

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