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The GTD Resource Motherload: 100+ Links

The GTD Resource Motherload: 100+ Links
Related:  Productivity

GTD Toolbox: 100+ Resources for Getting Things Done Getting Things Done, also abbreviated as GTD, is a popular time management productivity method created by David Allen. The method is just as popular today as it was back in 2007 when we ran our GTD Ninja post featuring more than 50 apps to help you be more productive and organized. But there are a host of new applications out there to help you be even more productive this year. Below are more than 100 of them. What are your favorite GTD tools? Complete Solutions iGTD - A free Mac OS X app. Kinkless GTD - Free Applescripts for OmniOutliner Pro for implementing GTD-style task management. OmniFocus - A Mac OS X GTD system that also works with your iPhone. tasktoy - A GTD app that includes printable lists and mobile access. Todoist - A simple GTD app with a built-in calendar, Gmail integration, and more. GTDInbox - A Firefox addon for using Gmail for GTD. Nexty - A PHP GTD tool that you can install on a local server. TaskFreak! ThinkingRock - A downloadable software solution for GTD. Notezz!

» Obsessive- Compulsive’s Guide: Top 12 Organizing Tips, Plus Resources By Leo Babauta Is your life in disarray? Do you have trouble finding things? Do you constantly forget stuff? Disorganization is a natural state of order. If you have a desire to get organized, here are my favorite organization tips … stuff I’ve learned along the way, from other sources and from experimentation. 1. So how do you do it? 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Getting started with "Getting Things Done" This article was originally posted during the first week of 43 Folders' existence, and, pound for pound, it remains our most popular page on the site. Please be sure to also visit related pages, browse our GTD topic area, plus, of course you can search on GTD across our family of sites. I’ll be talking a lot here in coming weeks about Getting Things Done, a book by David Allen whose apt subtitle is “The Art of Stress-Free Productivity.” You’ve probably heard about it around the Global Interweb or have been buttonholed by somebody in your office who swears by GTD. Like I did the other day with Quicksilver, I wanted to provide a gentle, geek-centric introduction to Getting Things Done, so that you can think about whether it might be right for you. The Problem with “stuff” Getting Things Done succeeds because it first addresses a critical barrier to completing the atomic tasks that we want to accomplish in a given day. So how does GTD work? GTD is geek-friendly The OSX angle/warning Links

Personal information management Personal information management (PIM) refers to the practice and the study of the activities people perform in order to acquire, organize, maintain, retrieve and use personal information items such as documents (paper-based and digital), web pages and email messages for everyday use to complete tasks (work-related or not) and fulfill a person’s various roles (as parent, employee, friend, member of community, etc.). There are six ways in which information can be personal: [1] Owned by "me"About "me"Directed toward "me"Sent/Posted by "me"Experienced by "me"Relevant to "me" One ideal of PIM is that people should always have the right information in the right place, in the right form, and of sufficient completeness and quality to meet their current need. History and background[edit] Although PIM is a relatively new field, information management began in spoken word; people would use mnemonics as PIM for the human memory. [1] Tools[edit] Study[edit] Related activities and areas[edit]

Next Action Analysis Next Action Analysis(TM) is a new approach for assessing the state of your projects and next actions. It reviews your ResultsManager Daily Action dashboard and scores the state of your system on five dimensions (5 F's). Installing and running the software The fastest way to get rolling is to run the Setup Program. It will install the next action analysis macro along with macros for MindReader and Mark Task Complete. Note that is it important to turn off the ResultsManager "Support Outlook/MM synchronization" option or else the analysis will get confused. Scoring The overall "NAA" score is an average of assessments across the five dimensions. Maximum score at goal level and then 50% reduction for each additional "-50%" amount. To improve your score see Next Action Analysis Advice. Software Output The ao_next_action_analysis.mmbas macro calculates the metrics above on your next action dashboard and adds a branch to it with the reports output. Sample Output Log File Related Blog Entries

Thirteen Tricks to Motivate Yourself - lifehack.org Who needs Tony Robbins when you can motivate yourself? Overcoming the emotional hurdle to get stuff done when you’d rather sit on the couch isn’t always easy. But unless calling in sick and waking up at noon have no consequences for you, it’s often a must. For those of you who never procrastinate, distract yourself or drag your feet when you should be doing something important, this article isn’t for you. But for the rest of us humans, it’s good to have a library of motivational boosters to move us along.How to Avoid Motivation The best way to motivate yourself is to organize your life so you don’t have to. Here are some other things to consider making work flow more naturally: Passion. Motivation Tips Despite your best efforts, passion, habits and a flow-producing environment can fail. Go Back to “Why” – Focusing on a dull task doesn’t make it any more attractive.

GTD Cheatsheet – An Intro on the GTD system The system created by David Allen in his popular book Getting Things Done focuses on freeing up your mind’s RAM (or resources). The GTD system simply takes all or our mental and physical “stuff” in our lives and organizes it into a system where we can easily: 1) Act on it or 2) Store it and retrieve it later. The GTD Cheatsheet is a small, condensed version of GTD. 1. 2. 3. The Unusual Concentration Technique That Transformed How I Work We all want to manage our time. But when I learned how to manage my energy, in addition to my time, my productivity skyrocketed. I finally stopped forcing productivity (by chugging seven cups of coffee) and started using this natural technique developed by neuroscientists: I work in 90 minute intervals, then rest for 30 minutes between each interval, while listening to music optimized to boost concentration and focus. After adopting this groundbreaking technique, I could concentrate longer, avoid distractions, maintain higher energy throughout the day, and dramatically lower my stress. Below is a visualization of this entire methodology: Yes, without context, that's incredibly useless. You see, every day is ultimately divided into thirds — 8 hour of sleep, 8 hours of recreation, 8 hours of work. In reality, the human body operates on 120-minute biological intervals throughout the day called ultradian rhythms. Early morning grogginess? Here's how I do it. 1. 2. Try it.

GTD in 15 minutes – A Pragmatic Guide to Getting Things Done GTD—or “Getting things done”—is a framework for organising and tracking your tasks and projects. Its aim is a bit higher than just “getting things done”, though. (It should have been called “Getting things done in a much better way than just letting things happen, which often turns out not to be very cool at all”.) Its aim is to make you have 100% trust in a system for collecting tasks, ideas, and projects—both vague things like “invent greatest thing ever” and concrete things like “call Ada 25 August to discuss cheesecake recipe”. Everything! Sound like all other run-of-the-mill to-do list systems, you say? One of the basic assumptions of GTD is that you are dumb—or, rather, that your subconsciousness is quite dumb when it comes to thinking about things you should have done. Jessica Kerr put it perfectly: Pretend your brain is a white board. A great part of the “magic” is to convert both tasks and whims into physical and visible actions as you soon will see. Awesome! Agenda contexts

Mental Heuristics Page A heuristic is a "rule-of-thumb", advice that helps an AI program or human think and act more efficiently by directing thinking in an useful direction. Some of these heuristics are age-old wisdom, bordering on cliche, but most are actually helpful. If you want something done, do it yourself Comment: Obviously true, and doing it is usually very good for your self esteem. A surprising amount of work can be done this way, and experts are not always necessary. Never procrastinate anything you can do right now Comment: Very powerful. When you have several things you could be doing and don't know which to do: Just do any one of them! Comments: If you cannot decide between two or more possibilities, then there is a good chance that the differences don't matter. Always assume that you will succeed If you can't find a solution, change the rules. Comment: Remember that there are no no-win scenarios. If you cannot do anything about something, there is no point in worrying about it. Anders Main Page

The "Perfect" GTD Desk 4 Things You Thought Were True About Time Management - Amy Gallo by Amy Gallo | 1:00 PM July 22, 2014 I don’t know anyone who doesn’t struggle with how to make the most of their time at work. How do you stay on top of an overflowing inbox? To make matters worse, there are lots of misconceptions about what time management really comes down to and how to achieve it. It’s about managing your time. Time management is a misnomer, says Jordan Cohen, a productivity expert and author of “Make Time for the Work That Matters.” Teresa Amabile, the Edsel Bryant Ford Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and coauthor of The Progress Principle, whose expertise in this area comes from reading the work diaries of thousands of workers who documented their struggles to get work done, says it’s more about managing your overall workload. You just need to find the right system or approach. “Having a system can be useful, but it takes more than that,” says Amabile. You need to devote time to change. This may be partly true.

43 Folders | Time, Attention, and Creative Work How To Make a Table in Evernote Posted by Kristina Hjelsand on 21 May 2015 Comment Evernote has a multitude of features to keep you organized and productive. One we really like for organizing information is the option to make simple, adjustable tables. We can hear you asking, “Why wouldn’t I use a spreadsheet for that?” Well, spreadsheets are great for things like financial planning, but using them for simple projects and tasks is like using a hammer to squash a fly: overkill. For example, let’s say you’re managing a team project. Here’s an example of how we might use a table for our projects, followed by a short list of several easy steps to make your own. 1. 2. 3. This is an example of how our content team created a table to manage blog posts. That’s pretty much it. If you want a more in-depth tutorial, there’s more to learn. The world's best way to organize your life. Sign up

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