background preloader

Zen Buddhism

Zen Buddhism
Related:  Ch'an and Zen

» Letting Go of Attachment, from A to Zen “Most of our troubles are due to our passionate desire for and attachment to things that we misapprehend as enduring entities.” ~Dalai Lama Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Lori Deschene of Tiny Buddha. If there’s one thing we all have in common it’s that we want to feel happy; and on the other side of that coin, we want to avoid hurting. We pin our happiness to people, circumstances, and things and hold onto them for dear life. We attach to feelings as if they define us, and ironically, not just positive ones. In trying to hold on to what’s familiar, we limit our ability to experience joy in the present. When you stop trying to grasp, own, and control the world around you, you give it the freedom to fulfill you without the power to destroy you. It’s no simple undertaking to let go of attachment—not a one-time decision, like pulling off a band-aid. The best approach is to start simple, at the beginning, and work your way to Zen. Experiencing Without Attachment Call yourself out.

Om Mani Padme Hum: The Meaning of the Mantra in Tibetan Buddhism Glimpsing a Few More Facets of the Mantra There are many ways to understand the meaning of the mantra. Here are a few of them: The Transformation of Speech [An excerpt from The Dharma, by Kalu Rinpoche, from a chapter on The Four Dharmas of Gampopa. ] "The second aspect of transformation [of confusion into wisdom] concerns our speech. Mere words, which have no ultimate reality, can determine our happiness and suffering. In the Vajrayana context, we recite and meditate on mantra, which is enlightened sound, the speech of the [Bhodisattva of Compassion], the union of Sound and Emptiness. At first, the Union of Sound and Emptiness is simply an intellectual concept of what our meditation should be. One of the disciples was very diligent, though his realization was perhaps not so profound. When the two disciples went to their lama to indicate they had finished the practice, he said, 'Oh, you've both done excellently. The Powers of the Six Syllables "Behold! H.H. top of page

Spirit Vaults : Meditation - Essay - StumbleUpon It seems everyone is interested in meditation...talking about the wonderful benefits, recommending classes and discussing the different ways to "do it". But, for a beginner, just what is "it"? And how do you do "it"? Our busy, hectic, lifestyles may seem to prohibit this peaceful practice, or provide a convenient "excuse" not to begin, or continue, to meditate...but, the happy news is, you CAN successfully benefit even if you practice for short periods. With the simple technique described below, you will begin and incredible journey. There are 100's of styles, traditions and forms of meditation, but this simple practice has always been highly recommended. Sit comfortably, preferably upright and alert. To sit on a mat, cushion or pillow, sit cross-legged, half or full lotus, depending on your ability. You may close your eyes (unless this causes you to fall asleep) or gaze with almost-closed eyes as if looking downward and inward.

The Five Varieties of Zen An old Zen student called Hsiang-yen went to dokusan with Kuei-shan Ling-yu (771-853), the T'ang dynasty master, and Kuei-shan gave him a koan, of which over and over he was unable to see into it's mysteries. Hsiang-yen decided that it was all too much for him and he would surrender. He went away and found a sacred site, the grave of the Sixth Patriarch of Chinese Zen, Hui-neng, and maintained it as a shrine. Day in and day out he had no thought about the world except his sweeping. Then one day, sweeping away, he swept a pebble into a bamboo grove beside the shrine. Among the various types of Zen presented to the people of today there are some which are profound and some shallow, some that lead to Enlightenment and some that do not. (PLEASE CLICK) GASSHO(PLEASE CLICK)CLICK HERE FOR ENLIGHTENMENT ON THE RAZOR'S EDGE Source: "The Three Pillars of Zen", Kapleau, Roshi Phillip, pgs.44-52.

The Simple Tao (Simple Taoism) The Way is to benefit others and not to injure. The Way is to act but not to compete.It does not show greatness and is therefore truly great. Be still like a mountain and flow like a great river Tao"the way", "the path". it is often represented by water because water always seeks the path of least resistance, yet is strong enough to demolish even stone when no other recourse is available. everything below flows from this. Here are 10 guides to the Way. To live them is to follow the Simple Tao as I see it, where it is up to us to tell the story, each in our own small way. Make your goal effortless actionavoid unnecessary action or action that is not spontaneous. Web Site Author: A.

Japanese Zen Buddhist Philosophy 1. The Meaning of the Term Zen The designation of this school of the Buddha-Way as Zen, which means sitting meditation, is derived from a transliteration of the Chinese word Chán. 2. There are basically two methods utilized in meditation practice in Zen Buddhism to assist the practitioner to reach the above-mentioned goals, together with a simple breathing exercise known as “observation of breath count” (Jpn., sūsokukan); one is the kōan method and the other is called “just sitting” (Jpn., shikan taza), a form of “single act samādhi.” According to Hakuin (1685–1768), who systematized kōans, there are formally seventeen hundred cases of kōans, and if sub-questions are added to them, a total number of cases comprising the system would roughly be three thousand. On the other hand, the Sōtō school, of which Dōgen (1200–54) is the founder, does not rely on an elaborate kōan system to learn to become a Zen person, but instead follows a method called “just sitting” (shikan taza). 3. 4. 5. 6.

Study Shows Meditation Changes Brain Structure in Just 8 Weeks - Family... Written by Suzannah Moss - FHG Senior Writer Participants in an 8 week mindfulness meditation class experienced structural brain changes including increased grey-matter density in the hippocampus, known to be important for learning and memory, and in structures associated with self-awareness, compassion and introspection. This is the first research to document meditation-produced changes in the brain. Previous research has identified differences in brain activity and structure between practised meditators and non-meditators. Researchers noted that long-term meditation alters brain-wave patterns, with greater activity in brain circuits involved in attention. The current study is the first to document that these structural changes are in fact produced by meditation. During the study MR images of participants' brain structure were taken two weeks prior to and immediately following an eight week mindfulness based stress reduction programme. Further health benefits of meditation References:

Zen Buddhism WWW Virtual Library Created: 5 Sep 1994. Last updated: 19 May 2017. 22 years online and counting Edited by Dr T. This document is a part of the Buddhist Studies WWW Virtual Library Please notify tmciolek@ciolek.com about relevant new/changed online resources. This research tool is optimised for transmission speed, not for fancy looks. Updates, additions and corrections to this site have been kindly provided by: Nicholas H. visitors to www.ciolek.com since 08 May 1997. This page was originally established and maintained from Sep 1994 to Apr 1996 by Dr T. Maintainer: Dr T. Copyright (c) 1994-present by T. URL [See also:Aboriginal Studies || Asia Search Engines || Buddhist Studies || Ciolek - Research Papers || Global Timeline || || Information Quality || Tibetan Studies || Trade Routes || Zen Buddhism ]

Related: