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The Art of Living: Vipassana Meditation

The Art of Living: Vipassana Meditation
The following text is based upon a talk given by Mr. S.N. Goenka in Berne, Switzerland. Everyone seeks peace and harmony, because this is what we lack in our lives. From time to time we all experience agitation, irritation, dishar­mony. And when we suffer from these miseries, we don't keep them to ourselves; we often distribute them to others as well. We ought to live at peace with ourselves, and at peace with others. In order to be relieved of our misery, we have to know the basic reason for it, the cause of the suffering. How do we start generating negativity? Now, one way to solve this problem is to arrange that nothing unwanted happens in life, that everything keeps on happening exactly as we desire. This solution was helpful; it worked. Other explorers of inner truth went still further in their search and, by experiencing the reality of mind and matter within themselves, recognized that diverting the attention is only running away from the problem. Vipassana is such a remedy.

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