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Vipassanā

Vipassanā
Vipassanā (Pāli) or vipaśyanā (विपश्यना, Sanskrit; Chn. 觀 guān; Tib. ལྷག་མཐོང་, lhaktong; Wyl. lhag mthong) in the Buddhist tradition means insight into the true nature of reality.[1][2] In the Theravadin context, this entails insight into the three marks of existence - (1) the impermanence of and (2) the unsatisfactoriness of every conditioned thing that exists, and (3) non-self. In Mahayana contexts, it entails insight into what is variously described as sunyata, dharmata, the inseparability of appearance and emptiness (two truths doctrine), clarity and emptiness, or bliss and emptiness.[3] Vipassanā is commonly used as a synonym for vipassanā-meditation, in which satipatthana, four foundations of mindfulness or anapanasati, "mindfulness of breathing," is used to become aware of the impermanence of everything that exists. Samatha is a focusing, pacifying, and calming meditation common to many traditions in the world, notably yoga. Etymology[edit] Henepola Gunaratana defined Vipassanā as: Related:  SpiritualityMeditationBuddhism

hrama Zazen In Zen Buddhism, zazen (literally "seated meditation"; Japanese: 坐禅; simplified Chinese: 坐禅; traditional Chinese: 坐禪; pinyin: zuò chán; Wade–Giles: tso4-ch'an2) is a meditative discipline practitioners perform to calm the body and the mind, and be able to concentrate enough to experience insight into the nature of existence and thereby gain enlightenment. Zazen in Rinzai school Kosho Uchiyama writes that Auguste Rodin's The Thinker, in which the "back, waist, legs, arms, and even fingers" are curled up, is the opposite of zazen posture.[1] Significance[edit] Zazen is considered the heart of Zen Buddhist practice. Methods[edit] Setting[edit] In Zen temples and monasteries, practitioners traditionally sit zazen as a group in a meditation hall, usually referred to as the zendo. Before taking one's seat, and after rising at the end of the period of zazen, a Zen practitioner performs a gassho bow to their seat, and a second bow to fellow practitioners. Posture[edit] Types of zazen[edit]

Buddhism For Non-Believers I’ve got that quarter-life crisis swag going on. I have yet to be very productive during my post-graduation time. I watch as my friends get bonuses at their jobs, read their tweets about how difficult grad school is, and be astonished that I don’t know one but multiple peers working for Teach For America. Yes, I did get to fulfill my stereotypical wanderlust moment by traveling through SE Asia for six weeks. Yes, I did get some form of an internship for a while. During those dark times I turn to a rather unlikely figure since I lack any sense of spirituality: Alan Watts. And so I give you this: Five Inspirations For Life By Alan Watts “Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth.” You navigate through the world by defining everything in your life and those definitions spur action. “Just as the wake doesn’t move the ship, the past does not move the present.” I get stuck in my past quite often. Yeah, more marine-themed similes. “It’s all jazz.”

Healing the Body with Mindfulness of Breathing This excerpt from a talk by Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh explains how to use mindfulness of breathing to bring loving-kindness to our dear bodies. The physical effect of this can be truly remarkable. As Thây says, “You should really love your body. The First Exercise of Mindful Breathing My dear friends, yesterday I spoke about the first exercise proposed by the Buddha concerning mindful breathing: “Breathing in, I am aware that I am breathing in; breathing out, I am aware that I am breathing out.” We should always start with our physical bodies, because our physical bodies also needs peace, harmony and rest. We should realize a true rest. Animals in the forest, every time they are wounded, know how to rest. Deep relaxation here is one of the methods of resting. The Second Exercise of Mindful Breathing The second exercise: “I breathe in, and I am aware of the length of my in-breath; breathing out, I am aware of the length of my out-breath.” The Third Exercise of Mindful Breathing Like this:

Shikantaza Shikantaza (只管打坐?) is a Japanese translation of a Chinese term for zazen introduced by Rujing, a monk of the Caodong school of Zen Buddhism. In Japan, it is associated with the Soto school. Etymology[edit] The term is believed to have been first used by Dōgen's teacher Tiantong Rujing, and it literally means, "nothing but (shikan) precisely (da) sitting (za) A translation of "shikantaza" offered by Kobun Chino Otogawa[6] provides some additional insight into the literal meaning of the components of the Japanese word: Shikan means pure, one, only for it. Origins and development[edit] Silent illumination[edit] Silent illumination may be understood as the integrated practice of shamatha (calming the mind) and vipashyana (insightful contemplation), and was the hallmark of the Chinese Caodong school of Chan. Shikantaza's origins can also be traced back to silent illumination. Dogen[edit] Even still, Chan Master Shengyen states that shikantaza is similar to silent illumination.[8][12] Practice[edit]

Nagarjuna Vergoldete Statue des Nāgārjuna Nagarjuna (Sanskrit m., नागार्जुन, Nāgārjuna, [naːˈgaːrdʒunɐ]; ca. 2. Jahrhundert) gilt als die erste historisch bedeutende Persönlichkeit im Kontext des Mahāyāna-Buddhismus. Das zentrale Motiv hinter Nāgārjunas Lehrtätigkeit, die den Grundstein für die „Schule des Mittleren Weges“ (Mādhyamaka) legte und der buddhistischen Philosophie zahlreiche Werke hinterließ, war die Wiederherstellung der Lehre Buddhas, deren Kerngedanke Nāgārjuna zufolge durch die ausufernde Schullehre in einigen Schulen des Hīnayāna Gefahr lief, aus dem Blickpunkt zu geraten. Nāgārjuna machte zur Unterstützung seiner Vorgehensweise systematisch Gebrauch von einem besonderen Argumentationswerkzeug, dem „Urteilsvierkant“ (Sanskrit catuṣkoṭi), mithilfe dessen er logische Widersprüche in den Postulaten seines philosophischen Umfeldes aufzuzeigen und zu dekonstruieren versuchte. Nāgārjunas Leben und Werk - Mythen und Legenden[Bearbeiten]

Bedouin The Bedouin (/ˈbɛdʉ.ɪn/, also Bedouins; from the Arabic badw بَدْو or badawiyyīn/badawiyyūn بَدَوِيُّون, plurals of badawī بَدَوِي,) are a part of a predominantly desert-dwelling Arabian ethnic group traditionally divided into tribes, or clans, known in Arabic as ʿašāʾir (عَشَائِر). The Bedouin form a part of, but are not synonymous with the modern concept of the Arab pan-ethnicity. The word "Arab" was previously synonymous with the Bedouin ethnic group, but has since come to denote all those who speak the Arabic language, as well as Arabised people with no descent from Bedouin tribes. The Bedouin have also been referred to by various other names throughout history, including Qedarites in the Old Testament, and "ʕarab" by the Assyrians (ar-ba-a-a being an adjectival nisba of the noun ʕarab, a name still used for Bedouins today). Etymology[edit] The term "Bedouin" derives from a plural form of the Arabic word badawī, as it is pronounced in colloquial dialects. Society[edit] History[edit]

Sam Harris on the Paradox of Meditation and How to Stretch Our Capacity for Everyday Self-Transcendence Montaigne believed that meditation is the finest exercise of one’s mind and David Lynch uses it as an anchor of his creative integrity. Over the centuries, the ancient Eastern practice has had a variety of exports and permutations in the West, but at no point has it been more vital to our sanity and psychoemotional survival than amidst our current epidemic of hurrying and cult of productivity. It is remarkable how much we, as a culture, invest in the fitness of the body and how little, by and large, in the fitness of the spirit and the psyche — which is essentially what meditation provides. In Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion (public library), neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris argued that cultivating the art of presence is our greatest gateway to true happiness. Harris writes: We know that the self is a social construct and the dissolution of its illusion, Harris argues, is the most valuable gift of meditation:

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