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Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky
Clay Shirky (born 1964[2]) is an American writer, consultant and teacher on the social and economic effects of Internet technologies. He has a joint appointment at New York University (NYU) as a Distinguished Writer in Residence at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and Assistant Arts Professor in the New Media focused graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP).[3] His courses address, among other things, the interrelated effects of the topology of social networks and technological networks, how our networks shape culture and vice-versa.[4] Education and career[edit] Shirky was the first Professor of New Media in the Media Studies department at Hunter College, where he developed the MFA in Integrated Media Arts program. In the Fall of 2010, Shirky was a visiting Morrow Lecturer at Harvard University's John F. Views[edit] In his book Here Comes Everybody, Shirky explains how he has long spoken in favor of crowdsourcing and collaborative efforts online. [edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clay_Shirky

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Here Comes Everybody This article is about the book. For the fictional character, see Finnegans Wake. Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations is a book by Clay Shirky published by Penguin Press in 2008 on the effect of the Internet on modern group dynamics and organization. The author considers examples such as Wikipedia and MySpace in his analysis. You Need To See This 17-Minute Film Set Entirely On A Teen's Computer Screen These words are probably unfurling inside one of many open tabs on your computer screen. Perhaps one tab is for work, one is for chatting, and another is for Twitter. You probably even have some others open for no particular reason. This is the way we receive information and the way we communicate now: constantly, simultaneously, compulsively, endlessly, and more and more often, solitarily. This strange new mode of living—and its indelible effect on our humanity—is perfectly captured in a new short film that debuted this week at the Toronto International Film Festival. The 17-minute, mildly NSFW Noah is unlike anything you've seen before in a movie—only because it is exactly like what many of us see on our computers all the time.

who’s the architect parked in front of my computer, probably tweeting. :) Welcome fellow travelers, visionaries, and agents of change! This is a blog exploring the co-evolution of humanity and our technologies. I started writing here back in 2009 while I was working on my MA in Media Studies at the New School in NYC. My passion has been in watching what is happening at the intersection of technology, communication and culture – how people are using the web and peer-to-peer technology to more effectively self-organize, collaborate, build community, and accelerate social innovation.

unCloud — It's not that kind. Control your own cloud. The proliferation of social networking and current developments in service-based platforms (what has become known as 'cloud computing') provide explicit examples of the privatization and commodification of social production. What becomes clear is that our experience of the web is bound to inherent paradoxes that are reflected in its technical organization. One of the foundations for its critique relies on the recognition of the ways in which the energies of peer production and social exchange have been expropriated from the commons by the market. unCloud is an application that enables anyone with a laptop to create an open wireless network and distribute their own information.

Evgeny Morozov Evgeny Morozov (2010) Evgeny Morozov (Russian: Евгений Морозов) is a writer and researcher of Belarusian origin who studies political and social implications of technology. He is currently a senior editor at The New Republic. Life[edit] Morozov was born in 1984 in Soligorsk, Belarus.[1] He attended the American University in Bulgaria[2] and later lived in Berlin before moving to the United States. 5 Future Technology Myths" The flying car has been prophesied for decades. It's one of the holy grails of the futuristic, utopian society, where everyone gets to zip around through the air and land easily, quietly and safely wherever he or she wants. You've probably seen videos of flying-car prototypes, taking off from the ground, hovering and possibly crashing. But the first "autoplane" was actually unveiled in 1917, and many similar efforts have followed.

Self-delusion and self-loathing Two shores of the same river, either can get you into a lot of trouble. Self-delusion is lying to yourself about how good you are. You might think you're a world class designer or actor or chef or administrator or problem solver, but you might be merely well-intentioned, hard-working and pretty good. Which is fine, but pretty good is hardly remarkable. Telling yourself the truth about what you've got to market is the first step to marketing with success. and...

P2P Theory I will respond to the critique later on. Here are the arguments from Stefan Meretz: “Michel Bauwens has made a proposal for a “median choice of socialist licenses” which is based on the Copyfarleft-License of Dymtri Kleiner. Cognitive Surplus Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age is a 2010 non-fiction book by Clay Shirky. The book is an indirect sequel to Shirky's Here Comes Everybody, which covered the impact of social media. Summary[edit]

10 Futurist Predictions in the World of Technology" As the world gets smaller by sharing more and more of the same cyberspace and social tools, we are, like it or not, becoming a bigger collective target for the bad guys. While our data puts us all "out there" in many ways, that same data enables those involved in dark networks and activities to get lost and take on false, covert identities in order to plan bigger and bigger attacks. Anonymous is one such dark group involved in "hactivism," having found its way into sensitive stores of information from the likes of the FBI, Visa and Mastercard, and government Web sites from the U.K. to China, causing large-scale, disabling computer terror. It functions as a collective of many individuals and spreads its login and computer activities thin enough to lead authorities in too many directions to track, and its acts target everything from politics to commerce.

Shirky: The Shock of Inclusion and New Roles for News in the Fabric of Society If you were in the news business in the 20th century, you worked in a kind of pipeline, where reporters and editors would gather facts and observations and turn them into stories, which were then committed to ink on paper or waves in the air, and finally consumed, at the far end of those various modes of transport, by the audience. A pipeline is the simplest metaphor for that process, whether distribution of news was organized around the printing press or the broadcast tower. Part of the conceptual simplicity of traditional media came from the near-total division of the roles between professionals and amateurs, and the subsequent clarity that division provided. Reporters and editors (and producers and engineers) worked “upstream,” which is to say as the source of the news. They created and refined the product, decided when it was ready for consumption, and sent it out when it was, to readers or listeners or viewers. Meanwhile, we, the audience, were “downstream.”

Being someone else: How virtual reality is allowing men and women to swap bodies It’s disorienting to look in the mirror and see yourself as another gender. I’m wearing my Oculus Rift development kit, and the virtual reality hardware gives me the illusion of being in a comfortable room in an Italian villa. There is a mirror in the room, and in it I don’t see myself, but a woman.

Dragon Dictation comes to the iPhone. Wow. (Mel Martin/TUAW) At this moment, the must-read stories in technology are scattered across hundreds of news sites and blogs. That's far too much for any reader to follow. Fortunately, Techmeme arranges all of these links into a single, easy-to-scan page. Our goal is to become your tech news site of record.

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