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100 Best Open Science Courses on the Web

100 Best Open Science Courses on the Web
It’s never too late or too early to start expanding your knowledge of science. With the wealth of free courses available on the web, that goal is easier than ever to achieve and can often be done without even leaving the house. The courses listed here will help you get started, offering resources on a wide variety of scientific fields from those that delve into the laws of the universe to those that explain the chemical reactions taking place in your own kitchen. Physics Use these courses to learn about both the basics and some of the more advanced topics in physics. Fundamentals of Physics: In this course Professor Ramamurti Shankar will teach you about the basic principles of physics. Chemistry Give these chemistry courses a try to get a handle on many aspects of the subject. Freshman Organic Chemistry: Use the lessons in this course to teach yourself about the theories and principles of organic chemistry. Biology Study cells, systems, plants and more through these free courses. Astronomy

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