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Command line tricks for smart geeks

Command line tricks for smart geeks
Everyone knows the answer to the question of life, the universe and everything is "42", but for the first time we can reveal the question. It is this: how many command-line tricks must a man memorise? You see, graphical user interfaces are all well and good, but when you want to get real work done it's time to switch to the terminal. And so, we squeezed our brain cells, dug through dusty piles of old issues of Linux Format, and sat reflecting quietly over many a pint of ale, all with the goal of bringing you this: 42 awesome new command line tricks we think you ought to commit to memory. So, strap yourself in and get ready for command-line heaven: it's time to kick ass and chew bubble gum, and we're all out of gum... (PS: if you're looking for general Linux tips, check out our previous two articles: Linux tips every geek should know and More Linux tips every geek should know. Make your own Bash wormholes Before we look at how to use it, it's worth going over how we typically see pipes. . .

How To Configure Remote Access To Your Ubuntu Desktop Version 1.0 Author: Falko Timme <ft [at] falkotimme [dot] com> Last edited 01/23/2008 This guide explains how you can enable a remote desktop on an Ubuntu desktop so that you can access and control it remotely. This makes sense for example if you have customers that are not very tech-savvy. If they have a problem, you can log in to their desktops without the need to drive to their location. I will also show how to access the remote Ubuntu desktop from a Windows XP client and an Ubuntu client. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you! 1 Preliminary Note I have tested this on an Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) desktop. 2 Enabling The Remote Desktop We don't have to install anything to enable the remote desktop on Ubuntu. (JavaScript must be enabled in your browser to view the large image as an image overlay.) In the Remote Desktop Preferences window, you can configure the remote desktop connection. vncviewer falko-desktop:0 Then there are the security settings. Instead of

All the Best Linux Cheat Sheets Linux Security Quick Reference Guide - An awesome security checklist reference IP Tables - If you are interested in Linux firewalls this is a must have TCPDump - Great cheat sheet to an awesome security tool Wireshark Filters - An awesome list of filters for the best packet sniffing utility IP Access Lists - Cheat sheet for IP Access Lists Common Ports - In case you don’t have all common ports memorized netcat - Reference to the swiss army knife of networking

Handbook of Applied Cryptography Alfred J. Menezes, CRC Press ISBN: 0-8493-8523-7 October 1996, 816 pages Fifth Printing (August 2001) The Handbook was reprinted (5th printing) in August 2001. The publisher made all the various minor changes and updates we submitted. You can identify the 5th printing of the book by looking for "5 6 7 8 9 0" at the bottom of the page that includes the ISBN number.

Cool, but obscure unix tools :: Software architect Kristof Kovacs A little collection of cool unix terminal/console/curses tools Just a list of 20 (now 28) tools for the command line. Some are little-known, some are just too useful to miss, some are pure obscure -- I hope you find something useful that you weren't aware of yet! Use your operating system's package manager to install most of them. (Thanks for the tips, everybody!) dstat & sar # iostat, vmstat, ifstat and much more in one. slurm # Visualizes network interface traffic over time. vim & emacs # The real programmers editors. screen, dtach, tmux, byobu # Keep your terminal sessions alive. multitail # See your log files in separate windows. tpp # Presentation (PowerPoint") tool for terminal. xargs & parallel # Executes tasks from input (even multithread). duplicity & rsyncrypto # Encrypting backup tools. nethack & slash'em # Still the most complex game on the planet. lftp # Does FTPS. ack, ag (silver searcher), pt # A better grep for source code. calcurse & remind + wyrd # Calendar systems. Command line RSS readers.

Welcome to VX Heavens! (VX heavens) Linux tips every geek should know What separates average Linux users from the super-geeks? Simple: years spent learning the kinds of hacks, tricks, tips and techniques that turn long jobs into a moment's work. If you want to get up to speed without having to put in all that leg-work, we've rounded up over 50 easy-to-learn Linux tips to help you work smarter and get the most from your computer. Enjoy! UPDATE: If these tips aren't enough and you want even more, make sure you check out More Linux tips every geek should know! #1: Check processes not run by you Difficulty: Expert Application: bash Imagine the scene - you get yourself ready for a quick round of Crack Attack against a colleague at the office, only to find the game drags to a halt just as you're about to beat your uppity subordinate - what could be happening to make your machine so slow? OK, let's list all the processes on the box not being run by you! ps aux | grep -v `whoami` Or, to be a little more clever, why not just list the top ten time-wasters: find . reset

Removing an object on a photo with GIMP Tutorial to remove objects (or people) and restore the portion of the background they hide in a photo with the Resynthesizer plugin. An impressive video has been posted on Youtube to show how, with Photoshop, it is possible to delete objects in an image automatically, without any design work. The same can be done with The Gimp in fact and for longer (it is not impossible that the same algorithm has been reused). This plugin "re-synthesizes" the background" and rebuilds it from same elements on the photo. First, see the Resynthesizer tutorial to know the purpose of controls. We will put in practice the commands using the same pictures that the Photoshop demonstration video. Using Resynthesizer in Script-Fu 1. 2. We want to remove the tree on the top left. 3. This windows is opened. 4.Here is the final image Using the Map -> Resynthesize filter To choose the sample that reconstructs the background, this command is necessary. 1. 2. 3. To remove the road, it is delimited with the lasso. 4. 5. More

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