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Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy

Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy
Bloom’s Taxonomy gets an active makeover in this infographic, which provides a way to think about how the actions involved in a class assignment might be categorized in the schema. Mia MacMeekin made this and many other interesting infographics, which can be found on her website, An Ethical Island. Check out the original link to the infographic. Katrina Schwartz Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco. She's worked at KPCC public radio in LA and has reported on air and online for KQED since 2010.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/22/take-action-verbs-that-define-blooms-taxonomy/

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Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating Chris Davis, Powerful Learning Practice LLC By Shelley Wright I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. I know this statement sounds heretical in the realms of education, but I think this is something we should rethink, especially since it is so widely taught to pre-service teachers. I agree that the taxonomy accurately classifies various types of cognitive thinking skills. It certainly identifies the different levels of complexity. {12 Days of Literacy} Infographic: Marzano's 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Effective schools make a big difference in student achievement. Effective leadership makes a positive difference, too. Effective teachers, however, directly impact student learning and achievement. It’s been shown that teachers who have a large repertoire of effective instructional strategies teach differently. They’re more intentional in their objectives, strategies, and intended outcomes.

A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking My approach to staff development (and teaching) borrows from the thinking of Donald Finkel who believed that teaching should be thought of as “providing experience, provoking reflection.” He goes on to write, … to reflectively experience is to make connections within the details of the work of the problem, to see it through the lens of abstraction or theory, to generate one’s own questions about it, to take more active and conscious control over understanding. ~ From Teaching With Your Mouth Shut Over the last few years I’ve led many teachers and administrators on classroom walkthroughs designed to foster a collegial conversation about teaching and learning.

Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students The phrase “personalized learning” gets tossed around a lot in education circles. Sometimes it’s used in the context of educational technology tools that offer lessons keyed to the academic level of individual students. Other times it’s referring to the personal touch of a teacher getting to know a student, learning about their interests and tailoring lessons to meet both their needs and their passion areas.

Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating Teaching Strategies Chris Davis, Powerful Learning Practice LLC By Shelley Wright I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. I know this statement sounds heretical in the realms of education, but I think this is something we should rethink, especially since it is so widely taught to pre-service teachers. Empowering Student Relationships With Media Debates over children and media use are nothing new, but the technologies by which children primarily interact with media have changed significantly. Most guidelines related to "screen time" were developed when television was the dominant media, but new technologies are making us question the value of older research. In its most recent report on the subject, the American Academy of Pediatrics makes reference to "important positive and prosocial effects of media use," and a call for expanding media education programs in schools. While more dedicated media education in schools would be great, it is little more than a pipe dream in the current climate of low budgets and high-stake tests. It is therefore incumbent on individual educators to help students interact with media in ways that are critical and empowering. We cannot limit this work to media that we have selected for quality or educational value.

Tips for Writing Instructional Objectives - Bloom's Taxonomy Job Aids I am so delighted to see this post that includes Bloom's Taxonomy Wheels by ZaidLearn. I always find that it's far easier to design materials using these wheels than it is to see the verbs/products in lists. Many instructional designers can benefit from these job aids when trying to find the right action verbs for their objectives. Here are some wheels for the cognitive domain. Source: Source: Tomorrow's Learning Today: 7 Shifts To Create A Classroom Of The Future Tomorrow’s Learning Today: 7 Shifts To Create A Classroom Of The Future by Terry Heick For professional development around this idea or others you read about on TeachThought, contact us. Let’s take a look at the nebulous idea of the “classroom of the future.” This is all subjective, but it’s worth talking about. So let’s talk.

A 3 Dimensional Model Of Bloom's Taxonomy - A 3-Dimensional Model Of Bloom’s Taxonomy by TeachThought Staff Well, technically it’s a 2-dimensional representation of a 3-dimensional model, but being limited as we are in 2016 to 2D screens, it is what it is. (Soon you’ll be able to 3D print what you see–download the plans and print it.

24 iPad Apps to Support Bloom’s Taxonomy via eSchool News Bloom’s Taxonomy, introduced in the 1950s as a system of organizing learning objectives into a pyramid, traditionally has started with creating at the top, followed by evaluating, analyzing, applying, understanding, and remembering. Some educators today are flipping the triangle so that remembering is on top, followed by understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating on the bottom. During an edWeb.net webinar, educational technologist Kathy Schrock presented a variety of apps for iPads that can boost student engagement and collaboration, and that can be used for teaching and learning according to Bloom’s Taxonomy. “Remembering” apps:Diigo – A social bookmarking tool; teachers can use this app on an iPad to add relevant bookmarks, or create their own account and share. Lists can be organized into sub lists.Evernote – A “must-have” app.

Bloom's taxonomy Bloom's wheel, according to the Bloom's verbs and matching assessment types. The verbs are intended to be feasible and measurable. Bloom's taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education. It is named for Benjamin Bloom, who chaired the committee of educators that devised the taxonomy, and who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals. Bloom's taxonomy refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). It divides educational objectives into three "domains": cognitive, affective, and psychomotor (sometimes loosely described as "knowing/head", "feeling/heart" and "doing/hands" respectively).

7 Strategies for Surviving as an Introverted Teacher I am an introvert who spends his days interacting with 140 seventh and eighth graders. Noise and chaos often overwhelm me although I believe that both are necessary for the learning process. I struggle to “be present” in the crowd and often find myself wanting to withdraw into my own world. I believe that relational engagement is critical to student engagement, and yet I have a hard time with start of a semester, trying to see students as individuals rather than six class periods. I’ve had moments when I wondered if teaching was the wrong profession for me. When I first began as a teacher, I forced myself to be extra visible on campus.

20 Ways to Supercharge Your Ability to Learn 20 Ways To Supercharge Your Ability To Learn “Learning occurs best when important information is selected from less important ideas, when selected information is organized graphically, when associations are built among ideas and when understanding is regulated through self-testing“Know the rules your brain works by and general tips for getting smarter.A negative attitude increases motivation to learn. Cheerful students think they’re doing well but have lower GPA’s. Good moods can harm your memory.Being social before a test increases performance.Testing yourself is the best way to study — even if you fail the tests.“A well-timed sugary drink, thirty minutes to an hour before you have to remember or take notice of something particularly well should improve how well you remember it.”

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