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Avant-garde

Avant-garde
The avant-garde (from French, "advance guard" or "vanguard", literally "fore-guard"[1]) are people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics. The avant-garde also promotes radical social reforms. It was this meaning that was evoked by the Saint Simonian Olinde Rodrigues in his essay "L'artiste, le savant et l'industriel" ("The artist, the scientist and the industrialist", 1825), which contains the first recorded use of "avant-garde" in its now customary sense: there, Rodrigues calls on artists to "serve as [the people's] avant-garde", insisting that "the power of the arts is indeed the most immediate and fastest way" to social, political and economic reform.[3] Theories[edit] Several writers have attempted, with limited success, to map the parameters of avant-garde activity. Bürger's essay also greatly influenced the work of contemporary American art-historians such as the German Benjamin H. Relation to mainstream society[edit] Related:  Thesis - Exploration of ValuedewikencanaWikipedia A

Pop art Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the mid-1950s in Britain and in the late 1950s in the United States.[1] Pop art presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular culture such as advertising, news, etc. In pop art, material is sometimes visually removed from its known context, isolated, and/or combined with unrelated material.[1][2] The concept of pop art refers not as much to the art itself as to the attitudes that led to it.[2] Pop art employs aspects of mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane cultural objects. Pop art and minimalism are considered to be art movements that precede postmodern art, or are some of the earliest examples of Post-modern Art themselves.[4] Pop art often takes as its imagery that which is currently in use in advertising. §Origins[edit] §United Kingdom: The Independent Group[edit] Eduardo Paolozzi. §United States[edit] §Early exhibitions[edit] §Proto-pop[edit] §Spain[edit]

Phillip Phillip Arndt is an internationally renowned speaker, workshop facilitator and holistic practitioner, practicing in Singapore, Bangkok, Bali, Hong Kong and Australia. His workshops and talks have inspired many people to realize their true potential. His healing work has transformed the lives of many people, bringing wholeness and healing, and assisted the lives of people with life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phillip is committed to the cause of raising awareness on this planet and empowering people around the globe to realize their true nature and fulfill their destiny of abundance and love. He passionately believes that individual transformation is what will lead to transformation of the planet – beginning with individual healing and working outwards. One of the first activities Phillip led for the Imagine Movement was a Global Retreats Programme, commencing with an inspiring holistic retreat in Bali in 2004.

Postmodernism A broad movement in the mid- to late 20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism Postmodernism is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late 20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.[1][2][3] The term has also more generally been applied to the historical era following modernity and the tendencies of this era.[4] (In this context, "modern" is not used in the sense of "contemporary", but merely as a name for a specific period in history.) Postmodern critical approaches gained purchase in the 1980s and 1990s, and have been adopted in a variety of academic and theoretical disciplines, including cultural studies, philosophy of science, economics, linguistics, architecture, feminist theory, and literary criticism, as well as art movements in fields such as literature and music. History[edit] Postmodernism and structuralism[edit] Deconstruction[edit] Post-postmodernism[edit] Literature[edit]

Pablo Picasso Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp are regarded as the three artists who most defined the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics.[4][5][6][7] Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a realistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. His work is often categorised into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919). Early life Pablo Picasso and his sister Lola, c.1889 Picasso showed a passion and a skill for drawing from an early age. Fame

Minimalism (visual arts) Jean Metzinger, following the Succès de scandale created from the Cubist showing at the 1911 Salon des Indépendants, in an interview with Cyril Berger published in Paris-Journal 29 May 1911, stated: We cubists have only done our duty by creating a new rhythm for the benefit of humanity. Others will come after us who will do the same. What will they find? That is the tremendous secret of the future. Who knows if someday, a great painter, looking with scorn on the often brutal game of supposed colorists and taking the seven colors back to the primordial white unity that encompasses them all, will not exhibit completely white canvases, with nothing, absolutely nothing on them. Metzinger's (then) audacious prediction that artists would take abstraction to its logical conclusion by vacating representational subject matter entirely and returning to what Metzinger calls the "primordial white unity", a "completely white canvas" would be realized two years later.

Crime Prevention and Rehabilitation Transcendental Meditation and Offender Rehabilitation: A New Approach to Crime Prevention Introduction In September 2003, the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation devoted all four issues of its annual publication to a special volume entitled “Transcendental Meditation in Criminal Rehabilitation and Crime Prevention” (J Offender Rehab 36 (1-4), 2003). This special volume presents a wide range of research showing that the practice of Transcendental Meditation can significantly reduce crime, criminal aggression, violence, recidivism, terrorism, and even international conflict, while simultaneously developing higher levels of psychological functioning—higher states of consciousness—in TM practitioners (see article titles and abstracts below). The Journal of Offender Rehabilitation is one of the nation’s leading academic journals for research on rehabilitation programs and their impact on prisoners and substance abusers. This special volume was conceived by Dr. Contents

Id, ego and super-ego Although the model is structural and makes reference to an apparatus, the id, ego and super-ego are purely symbolic concepts about the mind and do not correspond to actual somatic structures of the brain (such as the kind dealt with by neuroscience). The concepts themselves arose at a late stage in the development of Freud's thought: the "structural model" (which succeeded his "economic model" and "topographical model") was first discussed in his 1920 essay Beyond the Pleasure Principle and was formalized and elaborated upon three years later in his The Ego and the Id. Freud's proposal was influenced by the ambiguity of the term "unconscious" and its many conflicting uses. Id[edit] According to Freud the id is unconscious by definition: In the id, "contrary impulses exist side by side, without cancelling each other out. ... Developmentally, the id precedes the ego; i.e., the psychic apparatus begins, at birth, as an undifferentiated id, part of which then develops into a structured ego.

Dada Dada (/ˈdɑːdɑː/) or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century. Dada in Zurich, Switzerland, began in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter, but the height of New York Dada was the year before, in 1915.[1] The term anti-art, a precursor to Dada, was coined by Marcel Duchamp around 1913 when he created his first readymades.[2] Dada, in addition to being anti-war, had political affinities with the radical left and was also anti-bourgeois.[3] Francis Picabia, Dame! Illustration for the cover of the periodical Dadaphone, n. 7, Paris, March 1920 Overview[edit] Francis Picabia, (left) Le saint des saints c'est de moi qu'il s'agit dans ce portrait, 1 July 1915; (center) Portrait d'une jeune fille americaine dans l'état de nudité, 5 July 1915: (right) J'ai vu et c'est de toi qu'il s'agit, De Zayas! Dada was an informal international movement, with participants in Europe and North America. To quote Dona Budd's The Language of Art Knowledge, Zurich[edit]

Sustainable business Sustainable business, or green business, is an enterprise to be that has minimal negative impact on the global or local environment, community, society, or economy—a business that strives to meet the triple bottom line. Often, sustainable businesses have progressive environmental and human rights policies. In general, business is described as green if it matches the following four criteria: It incorporates principles of sustainability into each of its business decisions.[1]It supplies environmentally friendly products or services that replaces demand for nongreen products and/or services.[1]It is greener than traditional competition.[1]It has made an enduring commitment to environmental principles in its business operations.[1] A sustainable business is any organization that participates in environmentally friendly or green activities to ensure that all processes, products, and manufacturing activities adequately address current environmental concerns while maintaining a profit. 1. 2.

Walter Spies Walter Spies with Angelica Archipenko circa 1930 Covarrubias and Spies became very close. In narrating his life in Bali, Covarrubias wrote about his friend: "The months went by as Rose and I roamed all over the island with Spies, watching strange ceremonies, enjoying their music, listening to fantastic tales, camping in the wilds of West Bali or on the coral reefs of Sanur. Walter loved to collect velvety dragonflies, strange spiders and sea-slugs, not in a naturalist's box, but in minutely accurate drawings. The knowledge of every aspect of Balinese culture that Spies provided for Covarrubias' research was well-acknowledged by the later. In 1937, Spies built what he described as a "mountain hut" at Iseh in Karangasem. In December 1938, Spies was arrested as part of a crackdown on homosexuals. As a German national in the Dutch East Indies during World War II, Spies was arrested and deported. See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Covarrubias, Miguel (1937). External links[edit]

Leipzig Leipzig (/ˈlaɪptsɪɡ/; German pronunciation: [ˈlaɪ̯pt͡sɪç] ( )) is a city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. It has around 540,000 inhabitants[2] and is the heart of the Central German Metropolitan Region. Leipzig is located about 150 kilometres (93 miles) south of Berlin at the confluence of the White Elster, Pleisse, and Parthe rivers at the southerly end of the North German Plain. Leipzig has been a trade city, since, at least the time of the Holy Roman Empire,[3] sitting at the intersection of the Via Regia and Via Imperii, two important Medieval trade routes. At one time, Leipzig was one of the major European centers of learning and culture in fields such as music and publishing.[4] After World War II, Leipzig became a major urban center within the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), but its cultural and economic importance declined,[4] despite East Germany being the richest economy in the Soviet Bloc.[5] History[edit] Name[edit] Origins[edit] Leipzig old town from above

Expressionism Expressionism was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.[1][2] Expressionist artists sought to express meaning[3] or emotional experience rather than physical reality.[3][4] Origin of the term[edit] In 1905, a group of four German artists, led by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, formed Die Brücke (the Bridge) in the city of Dresden. This was arguably the founding organization for the German Expressionist movement, though they did not use the word itself. A few years later, in 1911, a like-minded group of young artists formed Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) in Munich. "View of Toledo" by El Greco, 1595/1610 has been indicated to have a particularly striking resemblance to 20th-century expressionism. Expressionist-Visual artists[edit] In other arts[edit] Dance[edit]

Stewart Brand Stewart Brand (born December 14, 1938) is an American writer, best known as editor of the Whole Earth Catalog. He founded a number of organizations, including The WELL, the Global Business Network, and the Long Now Foundation. He is the author of several books, most recently Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto. Life[edit] Brand attended Phillips Exeter Academy, before studying biology at Stanford University, from which he graduated in 1960. He was married to Lois Jennings, an Ottawa Native American and mathematician.[1] As a soldier in the U.S. American Indians[edit] Through scholarship and by visiting numerous Indian reservations, he familiarized himself with the Native Americans of the West. Merry Pranksters[edit] By the mid-1960s, he was associated with author Ken Kesey and the "Merry Pranksters", and in San Francisco, with his partner Zach Stewart, Brand produced the Trips Festival, an early effort involving rock music and light shows. NASA images of Earth[edit]

How to Become an Artist Edit Article Learning the Basics on Your OwnLearning From OthersPromoting Your Work Edited by Flickety, Rob S, Andy Zhang, Tom Viren and 92 others "True art is characterized by an irresistible urge in the creative artist." Ad Steps Part 1 of 3: Learning the Basics on Your Own 1Take some time and try various mediums of art. 8Develop your own style. Part 2 of 3: Learning From Others 1Enroll in local art classes. 5Visit art studios. Part 3 of 3: Promoting Your Work 1Create an art portfolio. 4Get internships with a master artist. Tips Keep old drawings/paintings/sculptures etc. to encourage you as you see your improvement.Doodling actually helps your perspective...When you draw recklessly, it helps you see what you're capable of.Art is made to be seen. Sources and Citations always try to make an art that looks so new but still percation

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