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Edward Bernays

Edward Bernays
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Ivy Lee Ivy Lee Ivy Ledbetter Lee (July 16, 1877 – November 9, 1934) is considered by some to be the founder of modern public relations. The term Public Relations is to be found for the first time in the preface of the 1897 Yearbook of Railway Literature. Early life and career[edit] The Parker and Lee firm lasted less than four years, but the junior partner, Lee, was to become one of the most influential pioneers in public relations. When Lee was hired full time by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1912, he was considered to be the first public relations person placed in an executive-level position. In 1919, he founded a public relations counseling office, Ivy Lee & Associates. During World War I, Lee served as a publicity director, and later as Assistant to the Chairman of, the American Red Cross.[1] Through his sister Laura, Lee was an uncle to novelist William S. Ivy Lee died of a brain tumor on the age of 57.[1] Effect on public relations[edit] Bibliography[edit] Writings by Ivy Ledbetter Lee:

The Battle for Your Mind: Brainwashing Techniques Being Used On The Public By Dick Sutphen Authoritarian followers Mind Control Subliminals By Dick Sutphen Summary of Contents The Birth of Conversion The Three Brain Phases How Revivalist Preachers Work Voice Roll Technique Six Conversion Techniques 1. keeping agreements 2.physical and mental fatigue 3. increase the tension 4. Uncertainty. 5. Jargon 6. No humor Stockholm SyndromeDecognition Process Step One is ALERTNESS REDUCTION Step Two is PROGRAMED CONFUSION Step Three is THOUGHT STOPPINGTrue Believers & Mass Movements Persuasion Techniques YES SET TRUISMS SUGGESTION Imbedded Commands INTERSPERSAL TECHNIQUE Visualisation SHOCK AND CONFUSIONSubliminal Programming Mass Misuse Vibrato Extra Low Frequencies The Neurophone Summary of Contents The Birth of Conversion/Brainwashing in Christian Revivalism in 1735. I'm Dick Sutphen and this tape is a studio-recorded, expanded version of a talk I delivered at the World Congress of Professional Hypnotists Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Birth of Conversion Charles J. Alright.

Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. He remains among the linchpins of the American romantic movement,[3] and his work has greatly influenced the thinkers, writers and poets that have followed him. When asked to sum up his work, he said his central doctrine was "the infinitude of the private man Early life, family, and education[edit] Emerson was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 25, 1803,[6] son of Ruth Haskins and the Rev. In 1826, faced with poor health, Emerson went to seek out warmer climates. While in St. Early career[edit] Literary career and Transcendentalism[edit] Ralph Waldo Emerson in 1859

Committee on Public Information The Committee on Public Information, also known as the CPI or the Creel Committee, was an independent agency of the government of the United States created to influence U.S. public opinion regarding American participation in World War I. Over just 28 months, from April 13, 1917, to August 21, 1919, it used every medium available to create enthusiasm for the war effort and enlist public support against foreign attempts to undercut America's war aims. It primarily used the propaganda techniques to accomplish these goals. Organizational history[edit] Establishment[edit] President Woodrow Wilson established the Committee on Public Information (CPI) through Executive Order 2594 on April 13, 1917.[1] The committee consisted of George Creel (chairman) and as ex officio members the Secretaries of: State (Robert Lansing), War (Newton D. Activities[edit] Poster encouraging consumption of more cottage cheese as a replacement for meat. Organizational structure[edit] Media incidents[edit] Staff[edit]

12 Things That The Mainstream Media Is Being Strangely Quiet About Right Now As the mainstream media continues to be obsessed with Anthony Weiner and his bizarre adventures on Twitter, much more serious events are happening around the world that are getting very little attention. In America today, if the mainstream media does not cover something it is almost as if it never happened. Right now, the worst nuclear disaster in human history continues to unfold in Japan , U.S. nuclear facilities are being threatened by flood waters, the U.S. military is bombing Yemen, gigantic cracks in the earth are appearing all over the globe and the largest wildfire in Arizona history is causing immense devastation. In times like these, it is more important than ever to think for ourselves. That is why more Americans than ever are turning to the alternative media. The following are 12 things that the mainstream media is being strangely quiet about right now…. Back on June 7th, there was a fire at Fort Calhoun. But the crisis at Fort Calhoun is not over. Nobody is quite sure yet.

Ministry of Information (United Kingdom) Lord Beaverbrook (10 February 1918 – 4 November 1918)Lord Downham (4 November 1918 – 10 January 1919) Keep Calm and Carry On, a wartime poster from the MOI in 1939 which, although printed and distributed, was never posted. The Ministry of Information was formed on 4 September 1939, the day after Britain's declaration of war, and the first Minister was sworn in on 5 September 1939. The Ministry’s function was ‘To promote the national case to the public at home and abroad in time of war’ by issuing ‘National Propaganda’ and controlling news and information.[2] It was initially responsible for censorship, issuing official news, home publicity and overseas publicity in Allied and neutral countries. The Ministry was responsible for information policy and the output of propaganda material in Allied and neutral countries, with overseas publicity organised geographically. American and Empire Divisions continued throughout the war, other areas being covered by a succession of different divisions.

Basil Clarke Sir Thomas Basil Clarke, KBE (12 August 1879 – 12 December 1947) was a war correspondent during the First World War and is regarded as the UK's first public relations professional. Early life[edit] Born in Altrincham, the son of a chemist, Clarke went to Manchester Grammar School and then as a young man, he played for Manchester Rugby Club, despite the handicap of having only one eye, the result of an accident in infancy..[citation needed] Originally, he intended to make a music career.[1] and he started a long-distance degree in Classics and Music at Oxford University but dropped out without completing any exams. Journalism[edit] His entry into journalism apparently came after a chance encounter in a hotel, where he joined in with some strangers as the fourth voice in a Gilbert & Sullivan quartet and was invited to write an article on musical appreciation for the Evening Gazette in Manchester. He worked as a sub-editor between 1904 and 1907 before its editor, C.P. First World War[edit]

Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History Common Core offers an incentive for teachers to use historic documents to build literacy skills in a content area while empowering students to be the historian in the classroom. But document-based (DBQ) instruction in this context requires four key elements to be successful: The right documents. Knowing how to look at them. I've assigned my pre-service social studies methods class the task of designing some DBQs and I assembled a list of some of my favorite sources for finding historic documents in World History. All these sites feature good search engines and the ability to download documents for use in classroom projects. Avalon Project The Avalon Project contains a vast collection digital documents relevant to the fields of Law, History, Economics, Politics, Diplomacy and Government. Musicians and an acrobat, Smithfield Decretals (Brit. The Commons / Flickr The goal of The Commons is to share hidden treasures from the world's public photography archives.

21 - Essays - Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) More E-texts Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Essays: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Essay 21. A Lecture read before the Society in Amory Hall, on Sunday, 3 March, 1844 Whoever has had opportunity of acquaintance with society in New England, during the last twenty–five years, with those middle and with those leading sections that may constitute any just representation of the character and aim of the community, will have been struck with the great activity of thought and experimenting. With this din of opinion and debate, there was a keener scrutiny of institutions and domestic life than any we had known, there was sincere protesting against existing evils, and there were changes of employment dictated by conscience. There was in all the practical activities of New England, for the last quarter of a century, a gradual withdrawal of tender consciences from the social organizations.

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