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WORD GAMES

WORD GAMES
Ammon Shea, a 37-year-old former furniture remover in New York, spent 12 months conquering what he describes as the Everest of dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), by ploughing through 20 volumes, 21,730 pages and 59 million words (read more here). We can only guess how much of what he read has stayed between his ears, which is, at times, quite a challenge for our students. Luckily for the latter, though, their word lists are much shorter. We can use some magic formulae for helping words stick in the head trying to come up with clever associations, getting students to use definitions, determining a rate at which words should be learnt without falling out of their heads, creating some “brain surprises” (see more here), or resort to some oldies but goldies – word games. These are some pen and paper games that require next to no time to prepare and might be used to get students to look through their word lists again and again, and help them retain new vocabulary. Squares Stop!

https://eltcation.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/word-games/

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British Accents and Dialects Wikimedia The United Kingdom is probably the most dialect-obsessed nation in the world. With countless accents shaped by thousands of years of history, there are few English-speaking nations with as many varieties of language in such a small space. (NOTE: This page uses the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). For information about this notation, please visit my page of IPA Resources.) Here is a list of the most important types of British English.

Language In Use It is great to show and offer students many examples of English language in use. Meaning, students appreciate that there are many ways to say the same thing and like to see the "nuance" of the English language. Here are some images showing different ways / expressions to communicate a similar thing. Making Words Stick: Memorizing GRE Vocabulary Making Words Stick If you read this week’s posts, you know how to be a full-fledged word detective. You also have the vocabulary books that provide you with the best prep. Now, we need to talk about the process of getting words to stick in your head. Below is the magical formula for helping words stick. Come up with Clever (and Wacky) Associations

Flipping Feedback: Screencasting Feedback on Student Essays by Ron Martinez By: Ron Martinez, PhD January 8th, 2016 Last semester I was faced with a larger-than-usual senior composition class for English majors—which of course also meant a larger-than-usual feedback load. 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' A posthaven user upvoted this post. — habebaakiar 3 years ago — barcahaters 3 years ago — Jan Arzooman 3 years ago

Vocabulary and autonomy The general aim is to involve the students in a more autonomous fashion in their learning, rather than simply having them presented with word lists selected by the teacher or syllabus. The role of vocabulary teachingHow can teachers help their learners?Self-initiated independent learningFormal practiceFunctional practiceMemorizingBest approachPractical activitiesReferences The role of vocabulary teachingIn the context of learning English as a foreign language, a learner is forced to be autonomous and independent and make conscious effort to learn vocabulary outside the classroom simply because the exposure to the target language is limited in class.

Vocabulary Exercises Teaching Matters WebEnglish.se has compiled a list of 20 vocabulary exercises to practise or rehearse new words without bilingual translations. The aim is to provide the teacher with a variation of vocabulary practices and to reduce the use of translations in class. WebEnglish.se complies with the research that promotes learning new vocabulary in context and through various activities, diminishing the use of the students’ first language. Word by word translations can misinform the students of the word’s usage, variations in meaning and connotations. It also gives the pupils with another mother tongue an obvious disadvantage. Links: 20 Word exercisesWord exercises with examples

10 lifesaving websites for ESL teachers Lisa has asked me for some recommendations regarding useful sites for EFL teachers and I’m happy to make a little compilation of the places I visit most often to find ideas, inspirations, betimes lesson plans if I feel exceptionally lazy (The Liberation of the Garden Gnomes by Peter Vahle is just shiny!) and share them with you. So, here we go – my ten favourite websites: Hope you’ll like my choice and give these sites a go. Origins of English: "Our Language is at Present in a State of Anarchy" In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, England’s population grew rapidly: between 1550 and 1650, it doubled, reaching 5 million. Reflecting this growth a number of new words entered into English: ghetto (1611), suburban (1625), and dialect (1570s). Concerned about the apparent anarchy of the language and the lack of any standards regarding grammar, spelling, and pronunciation, the Royal Society set up a committee for improving the English language in 1664. The model for the committee was the Academy which had been founded in France some 30 years earlier. Those who promoted this idea included the poet and critic John Dryden and polymath John Evelyn.

Games & Activities for the ESL/EFL Classroom - Page 2(I-TESL-J) Games and Activities for the English as a Second Language Classroom Page 2 Return to iteslj.org/games. Word Grab with Songs The 50 most important English proverbs What are proverbs? Every culture has a collection of wise sayings that offer advice about how to live your life. These sayings are called "proverbs". How can you use proverbs to learn English? It's good to know the really common English proverbs because you hear them come up in conversation all the time. Hurry up Raa Raa (Raa Raa The Noisy Lion) TagsAdvanced Every episode opens as we zoom into the Jingly Jangly Jungle as Lorraine Kelly, narrator, talks about what's happening there that day. All the stories are strong, simple and linear with lots of wordplay. The stories are easy to follow and easy to retell. Rhythm, rhyme, and repetition play an important role in all episodes linking vocabulary to real life experiences and actions.

From old English to modern English How and why has English changed over time? In this brief introduction to the subject, I will show how we can look at the history of a language in two main ways: externally – where, why and by whom the language was used; the political and social factors causing change – and internally – the pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary and written appearance of the language; the motivations for change arising from the structure of the language itself. I will structure my discussion around the conventional division of the history of English into three main periods: Old, Middle and Modern English. The Old English (OE) period can be regarded as starting around AD 450, with the arrival of West Germanic settlers (Angles, Saxons and Jutes) in southern Britain. They brought with them dialects closely related to the continental language varieties which would produce modern German, Dutch and Frisian.

Basic Conversation Qs (beg / preint) These worksheets can be used as a speaking activity. Students work in pairs and take turns in asking the questions. It's good if you as a teacher to circulate and monitor their work. At the end, highlight any mistakes that you heard. The two blank cicrcles should be filled in with students' own questions to ask each other. The second worsheet is more challenging as it requires more grammar knowledge.

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