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3D printing: The printed world

3D printing: The printed world
FILTON, just outside Bristol, is where Britain's fleet of Concorde supersonic airliners was built. In a building near a wind tunnel on the same sprawling site, something even more remarkable is being created. Little by little a machine is “printing” a complex titanium landing-gear bracket, about the size of a shoe, which normally would have to be laboriously hewn from a solid block of metal. Brackets are only the beginning. The researchers at Filton have a much bigger ambition: to print the entire wing of an airliner. Far-fetched as this may seem, many other people are using three-dimensional printing technology to create similarly remarkable things.

http://www.economist.com/node/18114221

3D Printing and the end of ownership - my plastic future There is a lot of discussion online regarding the possible (inevitable?) copyright/intellectual property/patent/legal fights around personal 3D printing. However, I’ve yet to see anything about a different fight that I have experienced several times now, so I figured I’d write about it and see what others think.

REPLICATOR — Putting the "Custom" Back In Customer Gifs have become a fixture of the web, transformed Buzzfeed into a major media entity, and brought countless millions of hours of joy to bored office drones the world over. There’s a gif search engine and a service that will turn these little moments of web zen into IRL animated pictures. So why aren’t these miniature animations used more widely for practical purposes? Do any ecommerce sites use animated gifs to show off the unique features of a product? How about replacing turgid instructional guides with gif-tastic help pages? Animated images are a perfect midpoint between static images and full on video content, but are rarely used for productive purposes, with a few exceptions.

Kurzweil Warns Retailers at Shop.org to Plan for Major Paradigm Shifts Attendees of this year's Shop.org Summit were treated to a talk by inventor, author and futurist Ray Kurzweil, who said the exponential growth in IT/computing power means the world will be very different in 3 years. He warned retailers to make sure they build change into their plans and business models. "There are major paradigm shifts taking place in 3 years - every sector of society is being transformed, and retail cuts across everything we do," he said. He cited a development that could have a significant impact on retailers and on shipping carriers.

3D Printing Feed a device with blueprints for a solid object of your choosing, then let the machine build it for you from plastic or other simple materials [1] Video illustration at "3D Printing” is an umbrella term that covers four distinct manufacturing technologies. All are “Additive Fabrication” processes that create objects by adding material in thin layers until a product is completed. Each technology addresses the challenge differently with accompanying benefits and drawbacks Who will get the biggest slice of 3D-printed pie? MakerBot's Bre Pettis says his 3D printers are for everyone. 3D Systems' Cathy Lewis begs to differ. Each spokesperson made a strong pitch during our 3D printing roundtable at this year's Consumer Electronic Show. Who's right? 3D Systems: Old guard expertise 3D Systems announced its Cube 3D printer at CES this year, but the company has been involved with additive manufacturing and rapid prototyping since 1986.

Enterprise Resilience Management Blog: 3D Printing and the Supply Chain The editorial staff at Supply Chain Digest asks an interesting question: "How Soon will 'Printed' Parts Revolutionize Supply Chains - and the World?" [22 February 2011] I first posted a blog that mentioned 3D printers back in November 2006. I discussed the subject at more length the next year in a post entitled Where is My Replicator? At that time, 3D printers were still pretty much an expensive novelty item. Why 3-D Printing Will Go the Way of Virtual Reality Update: Tim Maly has published an excellent counterpoint to this post over at the Tech Review Guest blog. There is a species of magical thinking practiced by geeks whose experience is computers and electronics—realms of infinite possibility that are purposely constrained from the messiness of the physical world—that is typical of Singularitarianism, mid-90s missives about the promise of virtual reality, and now, 3-D printing. As 3-D printers come within reach of the hobbyist—$1,100 for MakerBot’s Thing-O-Matic—and The Pirate Bay declares “physibles” the next frontier of piracy, I’m seeing usually level-headed thinkers like Clive Thompson and Tim Maly declare that the end of shipping is here and we should all start boning up on Cory Doctorow’s science fiction fantasies of a world in which any object can be rapidly synthesized with a little bit of energy and raw materials. Let’s start with the mechanism. Most 3-D printers lay down thin layers of extruded plastic.

3D printing provides a vision of manufacturing's future (w/ video) Dan Mishek, co-owner and head of VistaTek, with a prototype bust of Walt Disney. It was made using 3D printing technology at Mishek's company in Vadnais Heights. (Pioneer Press: Richard Marshall) Dan Mishek and his siblings operate VistaTek, a small manufacturing concern in Vadnais Heights started by his parents 15 years ago. Legal battles loom as home 3D printing grows The controversial website The Pirate Bay announced this week that it would begin hosting digital files for visitors to download and print out on their 3D printers. The site has coined a new word - "Physibles" - for data objects capable and feasible of becoming physical. "We believe that things like three-dimensional printers, scanners and such are just the first," the group wrote on its website. "We believe that in the nearby future you will print your spare parts for your vehicles." The site has faced extensive legal battles in its home country of Sweden over potential intellectual property infringement of digital content.

The Pirate's Dilemma Here you can download an electronic copy of the book. The price is entirely up to you. To download, simply click on the link above or the book cover pictured on the left. You’ll be taken to a checkout page where you can set the price anywhere from $0.00 upwards. You’ll need to enter your email address, but I respect your online privacy and promise never to spam you. Why would an author give away a book for free?

Emergent City / Joseph A. Sarafian “Emergent City” is Joseph A. Sarafian’s 5th year Thesis project at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. “By the turn of the Twenty-Second century, a new epoch in global survival had emerged. The human race was no longer concerned with sustainability as a trend, because it could no longer deny the fact that the world was in fact dying. The environmental catastrophes that surfaced in the Twenty-First century became increasingly frequent. Barraged with hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis, mankind was at the brink of extinction.

3D printing glass in the desert If you were stuck in the desert & only had one provision to choose from, what would it be? Well if your name is Markus Kayser you’d likely take your solar sintering 3D printer of course! The abundance of sand and sunlight in this environment provides both raw materials and energy. Allowing any failed mutineer or downed pilot to make nearly any provisions they could ever dream of! “By using the sun’s rays instead of a laser and sand instead of resins, I had the basis of an entirely new solar-powered machine and production process for making glass objects that taps into the abundant supplies of sun and sand to be found in the deserts of the world.” – Kayser

'Solar Sinter' by Markus Kayser is a solar powered 3D printer that uses sand as source material #3dprinting #environment #energy #rca Amongst the wonderful collection of work currently on show at the Royal College of Art, in the corner on the first floor sits an installation/object by Markus Kayser called Solar Sinter. An MA Design Products student project, Solar Sinter is probably one of the most inspiring projects this year, aiming to raise questions about the future of manufacturing and triggers dreams of the full utilisation of the production potential of the world’s most efficient energy resource - the sun. In a world increasingly concerned with questions of energy production and raw material shortages, this project explores the potential of desert manufacturing, where energy and material occur in abundance.

What is 3D printing? A beginner’s guide to the desktop factory - Yahoo! News Deep in a sub-basement of the GM world headquarters, dozens of high-tech machines emit a soft whirring sound. In a sandy liquid, as an arm passes quickly overhead while a model slowly emerges. It’s the side-mirror of a new concept vehicle with a place to insert the mirror and bolt the part into place. This rapid-prototyping room runs all year long, every day, seven days a week. The machines never quit.

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