background preloader

Transparency.jpg (Image JPEG, 2000x1000 pixels) - Redimensionnée (63%)

Transparency.jpg (Image JPEG, 2000x1000 pixels) - Redimensionnée (63%)
Related:  InfographicsUSA: Economics & Business

How Star Wars Changed the World Hopefully reading this infographic will give you a nice break, writing about it has for me. I sit here amidst a slew of homework, from writing a paper on Rousseau and his Discourses to studying Chinese Politics. Now after finding this infographic, all I want to do is put everything away and watch Star Wars. Whether you are a fan of the double triology (? Sixology? Whatever you want to call it) or not, there is no doubt the series has permeated our society. Not to lead you on, but this infographic is not so much about the story/plot of Star Wars. Click to enlarge Share This Infographic Get Free Infographics Delivered to your Inbox Confidential Federal Audits Accuse Five Biggest Mortgage Firms Of Defrauding Taxpayers [EXCLUSIVE] WASHINGTON — A set of confidential federal audits accuse the nation’s five largest mortgage companies of defrauding taxpayers in their handling of foreclosures on homes purchased with government-backed loans, four officials briefed on the findings told The Huffington Post. The five separate investigations were conducted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s inspector general and examined Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and Ally Financial, the sources said. The audits accuse the five major lenders of violating the False Claims Act, a Civil War-era law crafted as a weapon against firms that swindle the government. The audits were completed between February and March, the sources said. The internal watchdog office at HUD referred its findings to the Department of Justice, which must now decide whether to file charges. The federal audits mark the latest fallout from the national foreclosure crisis that followed the end of a long-running housing bubble.

60 Seconds - Things That Happen On Internet Every Sixty Seconds World Wide Web is growing at rapid pace. On average, more than a billion new pages are added to it every day. To give you an idea of how big world wide web is, our Infographic 60 Seconds will cover some really interesting facts about websites that we use on day-to-day basis. Please Check - Things That Happen Every Sixty Seconds Part 2 Infographic by- GO-Globe.com To Publish this Image on your Blog or Website . <a href=" alt="60 Seconds - Things That Happen On Internet Every Sixty Seconds" src=" width="580" /></a><br /><strong>Infographic by- <a href=" Did You Know That – In 60 SECONDS Search engine Google serves more that 694,445 queries 6,600+ pictures are uploaded on Flickr 600 videos are uploaded on YouTube videos, amounting to 25+ hours of content 70 New domains are registered

Rolling Stone Politics | Taibblog | Matt Taibbi on Politics and the Economy Thank You, Rolling Stone | BLOG ENTRY Today is my last day at Rolling Stone. As of this week, I’m leaving to work for First Look Media, the new organization that’s already home to reporters like Glenn Greenwald, Jeremy Scahill and Laura Poitras. I’ll have... Democrats Must Stop Ted Cruz's Hollywood Ending | BLOG ENTRY Having lived in the former Soviet Union for 10 years, I will forever have plastered to the back of my cerebellum the commemorative bumper sticker: "WWSD?" How To Lead A Creative Life [Infographic] | Fast Company [Close Window] By Jason Feifer Our complete guide to making your inner genius your greatest on-the-job asset. Back to article >> Infographic by Pop Chart Lab

AIF Partners AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of nearly 38 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare, employment and income security, retirement planning, affordable utilities and protection from financial abuse. We advocate for individuals in the marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name, and we help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services. A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world's largest circulation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org.

Visualize This: How to Tell Stories with Data by Maria Popova How to turn numbers into stories, or what pattern-recognition has to do with the evolution of journalism. Data visualization is a frequent fixation around here and, just recently, we looked at 7 essential books that explore the discipline’s capacity for creative storytelling. Today, a highly anticipated new book joins their ranks — Visualize This: The FlowingData Guide to Design, Visualization, and Statistics, penned by Nathan Yau of the fantastic FlowingData blog. And in a culture of equally increasing infographics overload, where we are constantly bombarded with mediocre graphics that lack context and provide little actionable insight, Yau makes a special point of separating the signal from the noise and equipping you with the tools to not only create better data graphics but also be a more educated consumer and critic of the discipline. For a historical perspective on infographics, be sure to see the story of Otto Neurath’s Isotype. Donating = Loving Share on Tumblr

Social Security and Medicare: What's the real cost? Q: What with the much benighted Washington debate, what can the states do to improve the economy – or more specifically, fight unemployment? Skip to next paragraph Recent posts Subscribe Today to the Monitor Click Here for your FREE 30 DAYS ofThe Christian Science MonitorWeekly Digital Edition A: The states can’t do much at all. My CBPP colleagues have tracked this problem throughout the recession (this is their most recent review). A few points are instructive: –clearly, this downturn has been much tougher on state budgets (as well as the federal budget) than the last one. –things are improving; the recovery in GDP that began in mid-2009 has begun to show up in higher state revenues, and states expect their 2013 shortfall to be half as large as their 2012 gap. –but the hole is deep and the damage severe; over the past three years, state and local governments have shed over half-a-million jobs. A: These are mostly scare tactics, designed to mislead. Most everything else is just noise.

Self-Described Mac vs. PC People infographic Profile of a Self-Described Mac Person vs. PC Person is a fun infographic looking at personality and preference differences. Based on 388,315 survey respondents from Hunch.com, it illustrates topics like who throws parties, math aptitude, taste in art, cocktail drinks of choice and would they ride a Vespa or a Harley. Our latest data project was to analyze how self-described Mac and PC people are different. From a research standpoint, even though the number of respondents is high, these are voluntary survey participants that haven’t gone through a screening process. Very funny, and a great job by the design team at Column Five Media!

An imperfect, but not-that-bad, deal on the tax cuts Posted at 6:14 PM ET, 12/ 6/2010 By Ezra Klein The White House and the Republicans are pretty close to a final deal on the Bush tax cuts. Here are the specifics, though it's worth saying that as near as this is to completion, it's still not done, and so it could change: 1) The Bush tax cuts get extended for two years -- with one ugly surprise: For the next two years, estates up to $5,000,000 will be protected from the estate tax, and the tax rate for the few estates that are taxed will be 35 percent. That's worse than the 2009 estate tax ($3.5 million exemption, 45 percent rate), though better than this year's "no estate tax at all." 2) The refundable tax credits are extended: The Earned Income Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit and the American Opportunity Tax Credit were all pumped up in the stimulus, but set to expire this year. 4) A 2 percent cut in the payroll taxes paid by employees: This is perhaps the most unexpected part of the compromise. So is this a good deal?

10 Essential Fiscal Charts A pound of flesh: how Cisco's "unmitigated gall" derailed one man's life High-tech entrepreneur Peter Adekeye's yearlong nightmare began after he dropped his wife off at the Vancouver International airport and headed downtown to The Wedgewood, a posh boutique hotel. Inside a tasteful boardroom adorned with gilt-framed mirrors, the US District Court for Northern California, San Jose division, had convened a special sitting to hear Adekeye's deposition as part of a massive antitrust action he had launched against his former employer, the computer giant Cisco Systems. An official court video camera recorded the proceedings on May 20, 2010—Adekeye affably answering questions in an elegant black suit accented with a pale blue shirt and a coral tie. At 5:15pm, however, two plainclothes women—the shorter one brandishing a badge—and two uniformed police officers entered the room. Adekeye was confused, as were his two Wall Street lawyers and the special judicial master conducting the hearing. But the four lawyers for Cisco knew exactly what was going on. "Yes."

Applying Sentiment Analysis to the Bible « OpenBible.info Blog This visualization explores the ups and downs of the Bible narrative, using sentiment analysis to quantify when positive and negative events are happening: Full size download (.png, 4000×4000 pixels). Things start off well with creation, turn negative with Job and the patriarchs, improve again with Moses, dip with the period of the judges, recover with David, and have a mixed record (especially negative when Samaria is around) during the monarchy. The exilic period isn’t as negative as you might expect, nor the return period as positive. In the New Testament, things start off fine with Jesus, then quickly turn negative as opposition to his message grows. Methodology Sentiment analysis involves algorithmically determining if a piece of text is positive (“I like cheese”) or negative (“I hate cheese”). I ran the Viralheat Sentiment API over several Bible translations to produce a composite sentiment average for each verse. Update October 10, 2011 Full size download (.png, 2680×4000 pixels).

Koch Brothers Flout Law Getting Richer With Secret Iran Sales In May 2008, a unit of Koch Industries Inc., one of the world’s largest privately held companies, sent Ludmila Egorova-Farines, its newly hired compliance officer and ethics manager, to investigate the management of a subsidiary in Arles in southern France. In less than a week, she discovered that the company had paid bribes to win contracts. “I uncovered the practices within a few days,” Egorova- Farines says. “They were not hidden at all.” She immediately notified her supervisors in the U.S. By September of that year, the researchers had found evidence of improper payments to secure contracts in six countries dating back to 2002, authorized by the business director of the company’s Koch-Glitsch affiliate in France. “Those activities constitute violations of criminal law,” Koch Industries wrote in a Dec. 8, 2008, letter giving details of its findings. Egorova-Farines wasn’t rewarded for bringing the illicit payments to the company’s attention. Obsessed with Secrecy The ‘Koch Method’

Related: