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Chris Anderson: How YouTube is driving innovation

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TED-Ed website launches in beta, lets teachers customize video lessons TED-Ed Launches Groundbreaking Website with New Tools for Customized Learning TED-Ed Platform Allows Teachers to "Flip" Video Content and Create Tailored Lesson Plans NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--TED, the nonprofit organization devoted to "Ideas Worth Spreading," today launches the second phase of its TED-Ed initiative: a groundbreaking website [ housed on TED.com that enables teachers to create unique lesson plans around TED-Ed video content. "Kohl's is committed to kids' education and we are thrilled to partner with TED to provide inspiring educational tools for teachers and students around the world" TED-Ed seeks to inspire curiosity by harnessing the talent of the world's best teachers and visualizers – and by providing educators with new tools that spark and facilitate learning. The TED-Ed site was built with a $1.25 million commitment from Kohl's Department Stores, and optimizes TED content for use in educational settings.

What a Non-Partisan Plan for U.S. Entrepeneurship Would Look Like - Derek Thompson The Republican National Convention praised small businesses and the Democratic response will praise the administration's role in helping job creators. But what would a non-partisan plan for entrepreneurs look like? The theme of the first day of the Republican National Convention was "We Built It," a rallying-cry from entrepreneurs who insisted that they didn't need government to start their businesses. This week, we can expect the Democratic response to highlight the ways Obama's administration has empowered job creators. But what would an entrepreneur-first platform, stripped of party politics, really look like? Here are your ideas... It all starts with consumers... Address the housing/household debt crisis. How health care costs pushed an entrepreneur into government work Six years into my law enforcement career, I was hospitalized with a major illness. 'Universal single payer would cause an explosion of entrepreneurship' 'The "pay raise" goes to [health] benefits' 'Abolish the payroll tax'

10 talks on making schools great With just over a month to go before the 2012 presidential election in the US, eyes around the world are on the contest between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. The election may well come down to a few key issues. So what matters most to Americans? Among the most important questions in the upcoming election is, “How can we improve the nation’s public schools?” To get you thinking, talking and voting, here are 10 talks from speakers with some very big ideas about how to reshape our school environments. Sir Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution! Emily Pilloton: Teaching design for change Education challenges can be met with design solutions, says Emily Pilloton. Stephen Ritz: A teacher growing green in the South Bronx Inveterate educator Stephen Ritz saw his students getting more unhealthy by the year, so sprang into action and created The Green Bronx Machine. Dan Meyer: Math class needs a makeover No problem worth solving comes in a simple formula, says math teacher Dan Meyer.

‘This Is Water’: Complete Audio of David Foster Wallace’s Kenyon Graduation Speech (2005) Last month, on the occasion of the author’s 50th birthday, we posted a large collection of free essays and stories by David Foster Wallace. But we missed a rare item: the complete audio recording of the commencement address Wallace gave at Kenyon College, in Ohio, on May 21, 2005–three years before he took his own life. The text of the speech has been published on the Internet and as a book called This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life, but the complete audio version has been hard to find. In the speech, Wallace talks about the challenge of moving beyond the superficial kind of freedom that can be acquired through power and wealth, toward a truer liberation that arises only when we become more fully conscious of the world outside our “tiny skull-sized kingdoms.” You can listen to the first half of the speech above.

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