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The World as Your Campus: Designing a General Ed Curriculum for Life

The World as Your Campus: Designing a General Ed Curriculum for Life
One of the biggest hurdles people face when embarking on a journey of self-education is deciding what to learn. There are so many possibilities that it’s difficult to narrow down the options. If you still don’t know what you want to focus your self-studies on, may I suggest you take a bit of time for “general education.” In college, we think of general education as the series of courses one must take to get a broad understanding of academics. Classes like English, math, and history, help students of all disciplines share a common base of knowledge. In the “world campus,” a general education is anything that helps you explore your own interests and share a common understanding with humanity. An inspiring essay from William Upski Wimsatt, published in Utne Reader, explores one self-educator’s personal curriculum: “I…enrolled as a student at the University of Planet Earth, the world’s oldest and largest educational institution. Here’s my curriculum: Live in a different city every year. Related:  osensei2001

Deschooling Yourself – How to Recover from Traditional Schooling Shred your textbooks! Burn your report cards! Before you embark on an independent learning journey, you’re going to need to take some time to un-learn the negative lessons you picked up in traditional schools. Perhaps your school years taught you how to read, how to solve mathematical equations, and how to come up with good excuses when you forget an assignment. School can be a valuable experience and expose you to a lot of new people. What is “Deschooling”? Some of us never recover from school. But, others are able to overcome the negative lessons taught in school. Deschooling is taking the time to un-learn the poor lessons you’ve picked up over the years. Dispelling Misconceptions Many former students have a hard time separating learning from the act of sitting at a school desk or doing busywork. Don’t Think: “Students can only learn with a qualified teacher” Think: “I am the most qualified person to be in charge of my learning.” Don’t Think: “Education happens in schools.”

The Lifelong Learner Infographic Continuing Education Infographics Lifelong learning is the ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons. The Lifelong Learner Infographic explores why you should never stop learning, the perceived barriers of lifelong learning as well as its benefits and provides tips on how to become a lifelong learner. Via: www.professionalacademy.com Embed This Education Infographic on your Site or Blog! Copy and Paste the following code!

Introduction to Self-Education Welcome to SelfMadeScholar.com. This blog is all about self-education – people learning what they want to know without formal schools or classrooms. Let’s start with the basics: What is self-education? Self-education is learning in its purest form. You can start at any age, whether you’re one or one-hundred. Why self-education? Take a look at almost any great historical figure and you’ll find that he is a product of self-education. Consider these examples: Abigail Adams received no formal education. Renowned mythologist Joseph Campbell decided not to follow his plans to earn a doctorate degree. and The Hero With a Thousand Faces – works that are still studied on college campuses today. Early American patriot Benjamin Franklin ended his formal education when he was just ten years old. , invented products such as the lighting rod and bifocal glasses, and assisted in the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Too old-fashioned you say? and Fahrenheit 451 What should I learn? Happy studying.

The Joy of Practical Learning…What Can You DO? An unfortunate number of people graduate from high school or college with a lot of knowledge and no practical ability. I’m a firm believer that practical learning (i.e. the ability to do something) is just as important as academic learning (i.e. knowledge about something). Practical learning encompasses anything that helps someone master a skill or ability. It includes skills that are sometimes considered drudge work…cooking, painting, fixing a car. As well as talents that are more recreational…skiing, drawing, dancing. Why Practical Learning? While skill-based learning comes naturally to some, many people are more comfortable with academic learning. When I graduated college, I loved reading and thinking. Over the next few years, I set aside time to escape from the written word and focus my energy developing skills. If you’re more of a thinker than a do-er, it may be difficult to focus on practical learning. There is great satisfaction in being able to accomplish something. Can you:

How to Learn on Your Own: Creating an Independent Scholar Resource Plan One of the most challenging and gratifying parts of learning alone is the opportunity to search for and select your own learning material. Students in traditional classrooms usually don’t get to decide how they are going to master course content. Instructors decide for them in the form of textbook selection, quizzes, tests, group projects, etc. As an independent learner, you can make your study time more effective by using only the learning methods that work for you. A resource plan is a document used to brainstorm the learning material you can use when you begin your studies. This article will show you how to create a resource plan to use in your independent studies. Step 1: Set a Goal The first step to creating a resource plan is to decide on a single goal. Ineffective Goal – Learn HTMLEffective Goal – Create several websites using HTML, referring only minimally to a coding book. Step 2: Collect Materials Books – The written word is still one of the best ways to learn a subject.

How To Learn On Your Own: Make A Personal Scholar Resource Plan One of the most challenging and gratifying parts of learning alone is the opportunity to search for and select your own learning material. Students in traditional classrooms usually don’t get to decide how they are going to master course content. Instructors decide for them in the form of textbook selection, quizzes, tests, group projects, etc. As an independent learner, you can make your study time more effective by using only the learning methods that work for you. A resource plan is a document used to brainstorm the learning material you can use when you begin your studies. Before you write a step-by-step schedule, think of every resource that is available to you (such as books, websites, knowledgeable people, etc). This article will show you how to create a resource plan to use in your independent studies. Step 1: Set a Goal The first step to creating a resource plan is to decide on a single goal. Step 2: Collect Materials Step 3: Make Connections Step 4: Take Action

The 27 Principles to Teaching Yourself Anything (aka The Self-Guided Education Manifesto + PDF download “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” —Mark Twain Note: This post is intentionally long. It’s meant to be our compass for learning the skills that matter in the world and throwing theory out the window. At the end of this post I’ve even provided two free PDF downloads to further guide you towards learning what matters (one is a list of over 30 of the best online resources for creating your own passion-filled curriculum). Enter the Unofficial Self-Guided Education Manifesto… Last week’s article on The Birth of Self-Guided Education caught like wildfire. When that happens, I know a topic deserves some respect. Many of last week’s comments blew my mind. Living Legends create their own education. The truth of the matter is every Living Legend (whether they dropped out of high school or got a couple PhD’s) took their education and their learning into their own hands. So without further ado… 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. “90% of my education was outside of the classroom.” 7. 8. 9. 10.

Memorizing Dates - How To Remember Dates For A Test Dates are often difficult to remember because they seem so random and obscure unless we can relate them to something specific. For instance, the American Civil War started in 1861, but unless you have a strong interest in the specific timeline of the war, there is nothing special about the starting date that separates that date from any other. What makes 1861 stand apart from 1863 or 1851? When trying to memorize a date, students can really benefit from a mnemonic system (memory technique) to help them recall the right numbers in the right order. For memorizing dates it might be helpful to borrow a practice from the London Cockneys. A Cockney is an inhabitant of the East End of London, England. In Cockney slang: Can you believe it? More examples: Whistle and flute = suit White mice = ice Tom Hanks = thanks Trouble and strife = wife Remembering Dates We can use the same method to remember dates. You can leave off the century, so that 1861, the starting date for the Civil War, becomes 61.

Blake Boles: 12 Ways to Educate Yourself Without College It's popular to criticize college today. No matter which way you look, somebody is writing about a student loan horror story, declining academic standards, disruptive technological change, or the narrow work options available to graduates. Criticizing is easy, of course. Offering solutions is hard. The reality is that college fills many valuable roles today. But in an era of skyrocketing tuition fees combined with widespread economic austerity, millions of students will find themselves unable or unwilling to finance the college package deal. Luckily, higher education doesn't have to be delivered by a college institution. Self-directed learning is one solution to the college debate, and certainly not the only one. Here are 12 ways to begin pursuing your own self-directed higher education, right now, without college: Kickstart something. These are just a few ways to start giving yourself a well-rounded higher education without college.

How I Study In An Organized Way I'm super crazy about organization. I'm no where near OCD, but anyone who knows me knows that I'm all about things being in order. Perfect example: my closet is organized by type of clothing and then organized by color. I like to know where something is when I go looking for it, but I'll put that in another post. Today I'm going to explain how I study and get homework done in an organized way. I'll go through this step by step. Syllabi Let's start with the syllabi. Once an assignment, test, or reading has been finished, I highlight it so I know that it's done and I don't need to worry about it anymore. Planner My planner is my sidekick during the semester. My planner, much like everything else in my life, is color coordinated. Moving On...... Here's how I get my weekly assignments organized so I can do them: I like lists. I pick a color for each subject, and make a list on a piece of notebook paper, the Stickies on my laptop, and organize my syllabi with the corresponding color flag tags.

DIY Education: Teach Yourself Education is touted as the greatest way to get ahead in this world. And, in general, it’s a great strategy. Maybe you have the perfect idea for an invention and you need a little engineering know-how, or maybe you just need to get ahead of the guy in the next cubicle over. No matter what plan you have for getting ahead, odds are a little learning will help. The problem, as I see it, is that education is also an industry. While you may need a certificate in order to be a licensed professional of some sort, however, you don’t need to attend an expensive class for many of your other learning needs. Resources — Getting Started The Independent Scholar’s Handbook — PDF: The Canadian Academy of Independent Scholars has made The Independent Scholar’s Handbook available as a free download. Resources — Learning Materials The LifeHack How-To Wiki: Consider starting your self-education right here with LifeHack. Staying on Track Anyone can read a book. Lastly… Read full content

How To Memorize Things Quickly People like to joke that the only thing you really “learn” in school is how to memorize. As it turns out, that’s not even the case for most of us. If you go around the room and ask a handful of people how to memorize things quickly, most of them will probably tell you repetition. That is so far from the truth, it’s running for office. Before we start, you need to establish something: are you an auditory, visual, or experiential learner? Step 1: Preparation To optimize your memorization session, pay close attention to which environment you choose. Next, start drinking some tea. As we get older, toxic chemicals will damage our neurons and synapses, leading to memory loss and even Alzheimer’s. Step 2: Record What You’re Memorizing This is especially useful if you’re trying to memorize information from a lecture. Step 3: Write Everything Down Before you start trying to recall everything from memory, write and re-write the information. Step 4: Section your notes. Step 9: Take a break

Merit Badges for Adults? You Can Do It! | Home.Spice.Life I found this book at a local bookstore that was going out of business. I am a sucker for “self-help” books with actual tangible to-dos. I was a total badge whore as a Girl Scout, so it truly speaks to me. Plus it comes with ACTUAL BADGES! The book was written by a victim of the 9/11 attacks and completed by her sisters after her death. I know I have a 27 before 28 list I need to get on, but I also want to take on the Merit Badges list. The “You Can Do It: The Merit Badge Handbook For Grownup Girls” List Modified Dare to Dream – Write Down Your GoalsBust a Move – Take a Dance ClassRoam Where You Want To – Travel Somewhere Exotic and UnexpectedTake the Stage – Perform on StageSpeak Up – Master Public SpeakingChampion a Cause – Get Involved in ActivismBe Your Own Boss – Draft a Business PlanFly Solo – Fly a PlaneSing Your Heart Out – Sing in Public Exercise Your Options – Complete P90XStretch Yourself – Become a Psuedo-YogiHang Ten – Go SurfingHead for the Hills – Rock ClimbingJump!

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