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'Stargazin'

'Stargazin'
Our own Angelica completed a DIY project over the holidays that's positively brilliant. She writes: After a series of failed baking adventures I realized it was time for me to transfer my love for YumSugar and food magazines to CasaSugar and design magazines. In the spirit of the holidays I picked a Light Bright project from this month's Blueprint magazine. I must admit, I'm a much better painter and craftswoman than I am a baker so the project was definitely a confidence booster. The Blueprint picture is on the left, my replica is on the right. To find out how to make your own replica, just read more What You'll Need stretched canvaspaintbrushesgroundcloth or newspapers to protect your floorpencilawlwhite twinkly tree lightscraft glue You can find the complete Blueprint directions here.

Bubble Chandelier At long last we are excited to share the process of how we created the Champagne Bubbles "Frou Frou Chandelier" for our boutique (aka Bubble Chandelier for those of you who want a simpler name for it)! Instead of paying $3,000-$7,000 for a chandelier, we thought it would be much more rewarding to create our own for just a few hundred dollars. This is a step-by-step guide for how we made the chandelier you see at Faire Frou Frou. Our chandelier measures 2'x4' which we needed to make large enough to make a statement in our boutique. Of course you can create any size or shape that you wish. Supplies: 2'x4' white wire grid panel (though you can do any shape or size) (about $15-$23)CB2 Bubble Balls (50 small & 40 large) ($1.95 ea small, $3.95 ea large)Silver Christmas ball ornaments (80 small, 80 medium)Fishing line (we bought high knot strength /30 lb.) $3One spool of sterling silver wire (20-22 gauge). See the little silver toggles on the table? Fastening the fishing line to the wire grid.

Mason Jar Light Pendant Pottery Barn mason jar light pendants Have ya’ll snagged a recent catalogue from Pottery Barn this season? Looks like everything that was out in the barn is now coming inside the home! Lots of rich textures, rusty fixtures and rustic lighting. Pottery Barn mason jar light fixture I spotted these awesome mason jar light pendants on the Pottery Barn website and then started spotting them on other sites like Ebay and Etsy. Lonely little mason jar My husband was convinced that he could save me the $65-$100 that these mason jar light pendants can cost, so we started plotting on how we could create one of these adorable light fixtures ourselves. The Right Tools Light pendant kit, mason jar and light bulb Here’s the list of supplies we used for our light: 1 large antique mason jar ($8.00)1 Edison light bulb ($5.00)1 single light pendant light fixture kit (by Westinghouse, in Oil Rubbed Bronze, available at Home Depot) ($15.00)1 Hole SawWire StrippersPower DrillHammerScrewdriver Get your glow on!

Crayon Art they are all over pinterest....(i still am not signed up for pinterest because i don't have time for one more thing but browsing is fun!) so we made one. i took a box of 64 crayons and took out the blacks and browns.i used another small box and doubled up on the good colors i liked and hot glued them to the top of our canvas. then we turned our blow dryer to hot on high. not long after you set the hair dryer by the crayons they get shiny and then the wax starts to melt! and it dries really quickly too. seriously. what could be happier than this?? GREAT project. loved it today is the first FULL day with ALL my kids in ALL day school.yeah...i am smiling as i type that. it's good. it's quiet. i am rockin' it. removing wallpaper.....making code for craft weekend stuff.....doing my hair....going to lunch..... it's all good. hooray for school!

DIY Glow Jars Tutorial Posted on October 19, 2011 by Christina Aren’t these glow jars sublime? They take about two minutes to make and cost only 20 cents a piece. These would look amazing at an evening outdoor wedding. If you like this project, check out my DIY ‘glitterarium‘. DIY Glow Jars Tutorial For each glow jar you will need: a jartwo Glow Sticksscissorsrubber glovessafety glasses Disclaimer: This is a project meant to be done by an adult – not a child! Purchase Glow Sticks (I got a pack of 15 for $1.50) and dig a jar out of your cupboard. Grab two glow sticks and cut at one end.

inspired ideas Making Memory Candles {A project from the Inspired Ideas Archives} This is such a fun way to display photographs! The technique uses black and white photocopies and transparent contact paper to transfer images to glass votive candleholders. What happens is that the black ink sticks to the contact paper. It's a lot of fun to do. I recommend using the small votive cylinder candleholders found commonly at craft stores. Cut a piece of the transparent contact paper (usually found with the shelf-liner papers at discount stores) to fit over your photo layout. Peel the backing from the contact paper and place the photocopied image ink-side to the sticky side of the contact paper. Burnish or rub the contact paper to the inked parts of the photocopy. Trim the contact-paper-covered print out to size. Next, soak the paper-covered plastic in a sink of warm water for at least 7 minutes. Some of the paper may begin to fall off on its own. Don't rub too hard or the ink will start to come off.

wednes-diy UPDATE: This post originally ran on March 23 2011, but with summer winding down we wanted to bring it back up for some late summer inspiration! a fellow fp girl sent this to me a couple weeks back and i’ve been thinking about it ever since! i can think of a million reasons why these would be awesome… as apartment décor, as outdoor party décor, and – wouldn’t they be the best thing EVER for camping in general or at a festival? you can buy a sun jar here, but you can make your own for much cheaper! what you need: a mason jar with a clear glass lid like this one from ikea, a solar garden light like the ones pictured above, which i found here, adhesive and glass frosting spray. start by spraying the inside of the jar with the frosting spray – this will help diffuse the light and give it a warm glow. don’t spray the lid though! glue the solar cell, or the parts you’ve harvested from the garden lamp, to the underside of the jar’s lid, and you’re done! last image. Trending on FP.com:

Newspaper Nails A few weeks ago I shared in this post that I learned how to do this amazing thing called "newspaper nails." Since I love words, and reading, and books, it has inevitably become my favorite manicure. Want to learn the how-to? First, gather your supplies. You will need white nail polish, newspaper, rubbing alcohol, and clear shiny polish for the top coat. Step one: Grab some newspaper and cut it into pieces big enough to cover your nails. Step two: Paint your nails white. Step three: Dip a piece of newspaper into the rubbing alcohol and saturate them well. Step four: Press the bit of newspaper on your fingernail hard for about three seconds and peel it off. Step five: Top coat time! Now admire your creation; and try not to chip your nails the first day like I all-too-often do.

The Hipster Home » Blog Archive » How to Make a Tiny Terrarium in a Light Bulb Ahoy there Hipster Homers! I’m Julie and I’m the very first guest blogger on this fine site. Today’s project involves breaking stuff, plants, found objects, and miniatures. Let’s get started! Dos and Don’ts: Do use sand or small pebbles; these are good because water drains through them easily. How To: You’ll need a few tools to make a tiny terrarium but nothing complicated to get started. Needle-nose pliersScissorsLong tweezers or chopsticksFlathead screwdriverGlasses or goggles Let’s start with the light bulb. We will be removing the inside parts of the lightbulb. First, remove the metal tip from the bottom of the bulb. Then, when enough of the sides are raised to get a good grip on them, hold one of the sides with your pliers and yank out the metal tip. Next remove the black glass. Now you will be able to see the interior parts of the light bulb. Using the flathead screwdriver as a sort of lever, snap the interior tube from the side. Pull out any remaining wires with the pliers.

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