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Avoiding "Learned Helplessness"

Avoiding "Learned Helplessness"
We all have students that just want to "get it right." We all have students that constantly seek the attention of the teacher. "Did I get this right?" "Is this what you want?" Now while it's certainly a good thing to affirm students in their learning, many times we want students to be creative with their learning. We allow them to own their learning and create assessment products where they can show us what they know in new and inventive ways. Similarly, we want students to be reflective, to ask themselves, "How do I know if I'm on the right track?" Curate and Create Learning Resources If we want to have students seek out other information from sources other than the teacher, then we must make sure those resources are available. Questions "For" (Not "About") Learning What do I mean by this? What else could you try? Questions are powerful tools for helping students own the process of learning. Stop Giving Answers Allow for Failure

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/avoiding-learned-helplessness-andrew-miller

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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed Arten Popov Teaching students that intelligence can grow and blossom with effort – rather than being a fixed trait they’re just born with – is gaining traction in progressive education circles. And new research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a “growth mindset” can help many kids understand their true potential. The new research involves larger, more rigorous field trials that provide some of the first evidence that the social psychology strategy can be effective when implemented in schools on a wide scale. Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that.

10 Commandments of Innovative Teaching 10 Commandments of Innovative Teaching As a new teacher I remember getting into my classroom for the first time. I set up the space like classrooms I had seen before and enjoyed; I got my lesson plans in order; packed the filing cabinets with resources; started to make copies of overhead slides; put together an area for reading and stacked the shelves with books I had picked up in college or from my parents house. Then the students arrived, and all my plans went out the window.

School-as-Studio Immerses Students in Creative Problem Solving What might students accomplish if they could spend part of their K-12 education on challenges that took them outside the regular classroom? How might teaching and learning change if school became the place to interact with experts, use professional-grade tools, and immerse yourself in collaborative problem solving and prototyping? Some interesting answers are emerging from NuVu Studio, a break-the-mold school that occupies an inconspicuous spot on a busy street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Launched in 2010 by a trio of bold thinkers from MIT, the school initially attracted students from independent schools and from families that could afford enriching experiences for their children.

Research vs. Searching Google’s official blog post outlining the new Google, plus Search Your World service explains some of the benefits of integrating crowd-sourced, social-inputs to your search queries: Say you’re looking for a vacation destination. You can of course search the web, but what if you want to learn from the experiences your friends have had on their vacations?

The concept of different “learning styles” is one of the greatest neuroscience myths Are you a visual learner who writes notes in a rainbow of different colors, or do you have to read something aloud before it will sink it? Chances are, you’ve been asked a similar question at some point in your life, and believe the concept of different “learning styles” is perfectly valid. But, as Quartz reported in December, we all learn in fundamentally similar ways. And, as New York magazine reports, the idea that students learn differently depending on their personal preference for visual, auditory or kinesthetic cues is just a myth. In fact, it’s considered a “neuromyth,” which, as Paul Howard-Jones, professor of neuroscience and education at Bristol University, writes in a 2014 paper on the subject, is characterized by a misunderstanding, misreading, or misquoting of scientifically established facts. Other examples of neuromyths include that we only use 10% of our brain, and that drinking less than six to eight glasses of water a day will cause the brain to shrink.

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Research Tools - Springfield Township H.S. Virtual Library - Spartan Guides f... Rules for Using In-Text Documentation 1. Use the author's last name and give the page number in parentheses. Do not use "page" or abbreviations for page, just write the number.

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