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Why are we a nation of tree-huggers?

Why are we a nation of tree-huggers?
3 February 2011Last updated at 15:44 By Jon Kelly BBC News Magazine Plans to transfer ownership of many public forests in England have provoked a huge row. But why are we so protective of our woodlands? It's about the rustling of the leaves and the crunch of twigs underfoot. Above all, it's a place where nature takes priority over humans. For the vast majority of us, living in towns and cities, visiting a forest is the easiest way to escape our mechanised, wipe-clean, ring-roaded civilisation and properly get back to nature. As the government is finding out, a forest unleashes something deeply primordial in otherwise domesticated, suburban Britons. Plans to radically change the ownership of some of England's forests have provoked a furious backlash. A YouGov poll suggested that 84% of people were opposed. to the government's plans, with one pressure group saying it had collected 400,000 signatures on a petition. Continue reading the main story Why trees are a force for good Related:  ForestsEco Issues

Greenpeace UK Conservation in Madagascar Madagascar has suffered environmental degradation over a significant part of its land mass. Forests that once blanketed the eastern third of the island have now been degraded, fragmented, and converted to scrub land. Spiny forests in the south are rapidly giving way to "cactus scrub" as indigenous vegetation is cut and burned for subsistence charcoal production. Viewed from above, Madagascar's rivers look as if they are bleeding the country to death as soil is eroded away from the central highlands. Each year as much as a third of the country burns and 1 percent of its remaining forests are leveled. This ecological decline has not been ignored. At present, more dollars are pouring into conservation efforts in Madagascar than any other part of Africa. Next >> Conservation index Parks in Madagascar | Madagascar's Parks Service Ecotourism hints | Being an ethical traveler Find a mistake?

Glacier Thermal Blanket Photos via MeteoLive In hopes of slowing the rate at which ice is melting in the mountains of northern Italy, officials have begun covering one their most threatened glaciers with insulating fabric, creating what is essentially a giant security blanket to help keep the ice from melting in the summer heat. It may sound a bit unusual, but tests have shown that the thermal blanket may be just the thing to save the region's glaciers from disappearing completely, for the time being, at least.Armed with nearly 970 thousand square feet of 4 millimeter thick thermal material, workers scramble to cover the highly threatened Presena glacier to protect it from the sun's ultraviolet rays. With any luck, the insulating material reduce the amount of ice that melts from the summer heat until it's removed at the end of the season. This isn't the first time Italy has used this material to help preserve its glaciers. And the culprit?

A bit of green :: Crafts :: Plastic Cup Lamp Now that my university is closed for winter holidays, I finally have more free time to do all the crafty things I’ve been wanting to. One of these is a lamp made from plastic cups I’ve seen at taf, the art foundation, in the Monastiraki region in the center of Athens. When I first saw it at taf, I was amazed; I looked closely and I couldn’t believe my eyes! Disclaimer: There have been some concerns about the safety of this construction (see the comment of user “when” below for example). I only needed a couple of things: 200-250 large plastic cups (recyclable, at least )600-700 staplesa staplera lamp socket, lamp cord and plug – mine came from a broken IKEA lamp! That’s all you will need. Start stapling the cups together as shown. Staple again and again and again… Until your lamp goes from this… …to this! Staple carefully the last cups to form the top of the sphere (if it’s a sphere, because it’s likely that it won’t be that round if some cups aren’t perfectly aligned). You might also like:

Rainforest - mongabay.com Global Environment - Biodiversity - Decidious Forest Biome This biome is found in three separate regions in the northern hemisphere. The types of trees you can find in these three regions are broad leafed deciduous trees and some of the evergreen species. The trees are more commonly known as ash, beech, birch and northern arrowwood. Also found in this biome are wild flowers such as oxlip, bluebells, painted trillium and primrose. The soil is very fertile. There are many types of animals in the deciduous forest ranging from mammals like deer to bugs like mosquitoes. A few common animals found in the deciduous forest are, deer, gray squirrels, mice raccoons, salamanders, snakes, robins, frogs and many types of insects. Most deciduous forests are found in Eastern North America somewhere around 35-48° N, and Europe and Asia around 45-60° N. The average temperature is around 50° F (about 10° C).

Ecology Drives the Worldwide Distribution of Human Diseases Identifying the factors underlying the origin and maintenance of the latitudinal diversity gradient is a central problem in ecology, but no consensus has emerged on which processes might generate this broad pattern. Interestingly, the vast majority of studies exploring the gradient have focused on free-living organisms, ignoring parasitic and infectious disease (PID) species. Here, we address the influence of environmental factors on the biological diversity of human pathogens and their global spatial organization. Using generalized linear multivariate models and Monte Carlo simulations, we conducted a series of comparative analyses to test the hypothesis that human PIDs exhibit the same global patterns of distribution as other taxonomic groups. We found a significant negative relationship between latitude and PID species richness, and a nested spatial organization, i.e., the accumulation of PID species with latitude, over large spatial scales. Figures Copyright: © 2004 Guernier et al.

CleanTechnica: Cleantech innovation news and views Wildlife Webcams - Live from the Rainforest Enjoying this page? If everyone watching World Land Trust's webcams made a donation of £1, it would cover the cost of keeping the cameras running and enable us to add more to the network! For example, text WEBC13 £3 ($5) to 70070 to donate £3 ($5) to World Land Trust's webcam fund. Donate with Live webcams by the World Land Trust (WLT) stream rainforest life from across South America Discover tropical birds and charismatic animals that you have never seen before - from greedy families of coatis to vibrant fluttering hummingbirds. Share your passion for the natural world with people from across the globe with the Webcam Chat and get your wildlife questions answered by an expert. Our three webcams show live footage from the breath-taking and remote tropical forests of Ecuador, Brazil and Argentina, where WLT is supporting conservation projects to protect some of the most threatened habitats and wildlife on Earth. Find out more about WLT's conservation projects » Sir David Attenborough, WLT Patron

BBC - Natural History Museum surveys New Forest biodiversity A snapshot of biodiversity in the New Forest is being taken by experts from the Natural History Museum. As part of a large-scale study project, they will revisit the area in 10 years' time to map any changes in the landscape. Forty plots within six habitats across the forest are being used to sample lichens, algae, insects and soil. A parallel project is taking place in Paraguay later this year. Ongoing study It is hoped this data will provide a baseline from which comparisons can be made when the study is repeated in 10 years time. Ian Barker, New Forest National Park Authority ecologist said: "The New Forest continues to be a magnificent landscape with an abundance of really special wildlife. "Insects, lichen and soils - which are the building blocks of biodiversity are often overlooked because people are generally more interested in the bigger species such as birds. The New Forest is the most densely populated national park in the UK and has over 13 million visitors each year.

Addressing the nuclear waste issue Public release date: 4-Apr-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Megan Fellmanfellman@northwestern.edu 847-491-3115Northwestern University Researchers from Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory have an enhanced understanding of a common freshwater alga and its remarkable ability to remove strontium from water. Insight into this mechanism ultimately could help scientists design methods to remove radioactive strontium from existing nuclear waste. Strontium 90, a major waste component, is one of the more dangerous radioactive fission materials created within a nuclear reactor. The researchers are the first to show quantitatively how Closterium moniliferum, one of the bright green algae often seen in ponds, sequesters strontium (in the form of barium-strontium-sulfate crystals). The results are published by the journal ChemSusChem, a sister journal of Angewandte Chemie. Joester is the Morris E. [ Print | E-mail AAAS and EurekAlert!

10 World’s Greenest Countries The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) is a method of measuring the performance of national governments related to environmental policies. Yale University and Columbia University release the EPI every year during the World Economic Forum, ranking 163 countries according to 25 indicators. The final mark shows how close the country is to accomplish the environmental goals. 1. www.metrolic.com Iceland is considered to be one of the world’s most beautiful countries because of the breathtaking nature, but they can still enjoy that due to the high level of accomplishing the environmental policy goals. 2. Switzerland was leading the EPI list years ago, but now has fallen to the second place just due to incredible Iceland performance. 3. www.thundafunda.com Costa Rica government is strongly committed to following the Icelandic example for use of renewable energy sources. 4. www.sputcom3.co.uk 5. www.boxturtlebulletin.com 6. www.wallcoo.net 7. www.ontfin.com 8. www.globalissuesat-cz.blogspot.com

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Natural lovers., All natural beauties to be experienced by each individual., by mdspatsy Apr 7

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