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Message to My Freshman Students 

Message to My Freshman Students 
For the first time in many years I am teaching a freshman course, Introduction to Philosophy. The experience has been mostly good. I had been told that my freshman students would be apathetic, incurious, inattentive, unresponsive and frequently absent, and that they would exude an insufferable sense of entitlement. I am happy to say that this characterization was not true of most students. Still, some students are often absent, and others, even when present, are distracted or disengaged. Some have had to be cautioned that class is not their social hour and others reminded not to send text messages in class. Welcome to higher education! First, I am your professor, not your teacher. Your teachers were held responsible if you failed, and expected to show that they had tried hard to avoid that dreaded result. Secondly, universities are ancient and tend to do things the old-fashioned way. Lecture has come under attack recently. Hogwash. Take the issue of documentation.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/keith-m-parsons/message-to-my-freshman-st_b_7275016.html

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How to Properly Research Online (and Not Embarrass Yourself with the Results) Warning: if you are going to argue a point about politics, medicine, animal care, or gun control, then you better take the time to make your argument legit. Spending 10 seconds with Google and copy-pasting wikipedia links doesn't cut it. The standard for an intelligent argument is Legitimate research is called RE-search for a reason: patient repetition and careful filtering is what will win the day. There are over 86 billion web pages published, and most of those pages are not worth quoting. To successfully sift it all, you must use consistent and reliable filtering methods.

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Guidelines for writing a literature review "How to" Guideline series is coordinated by Helen Mongan-Rallis of the Education Department at the University of Minnesota Duluth. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions to improve these guidelines please me at e-mail hrallis@d.umn.edu. by Helen Mongan-Rallis. How Robots & Algorithms Are Taking Over by Sue Halpern The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr Norton, 276 pp., $26.95 Feeding English Majors in the 21st Century What if, rather than offer platitudes about the value of the liberal arts to students who are justifiably anxious about their economic future, we actually taught them to market themselves and their degrees with integrity? What if, alongside teaching our disciplines, we taught students to identify and articulate the usefulness of their educational choices? Those questions led me to offer a new course this past fall called "Novel English Majors."

Sixth form colleges left on starvation rations by government cuts, says report Sixth form colleges are on “starvation rations” as a result of government funding cuts that have put their survival at risk, according to a report. Almost four out of every 10 sixth form principals say it is likely their college will cease to be a going concern within five years, according to Tuesday’s report, while seven out of 10 say they cannot provide students with a quality education with the money they are set to receive next year. Research by the Sixth Form Colleges Association (SFCA), which represents England’s 93 sixth form colleges, reveals an alarming picture of a beleaguered sector “under serious threat”, with almost all college leaders worried about the financial health of their institutions.

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Letter to a young learner After a lifetime of being a student of my mother‘s — she was a gifted teacher who stoutly defended my right to color outside the lines — and ten years of teaching students at UC Berkeley and Stanford — I was rewarded by being able to recognize an important student when she came along. She is twelve. While she is bright in school, her interests are not those of her schoolmates or teachers. I work closely with her mother on planning some work with her during the summer and after school once a week. We’re starting with “A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe,” because it offers a more compelling and interdisciplinary narrative about the magic of numbers and geometric shapes than her seventh grade math books, and because it takes an active approach — the diligent learner can construct the important geometric figures with compass and straightedge. When she comes for a lesson, I use the passages she has underlined as jumping-off places for conversations.

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