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12 Rules Of Great Teaching -

12 Rules Of Great Teaching -
12 Rules Of Great Teaching by Terry Heick Recently, I’ve been thinking of the universal truths in teaching. Students should be first. Don’t always start planning with a standard. Questions matter more than answers. So I thought I’d gather twelve of them to start with. 1. This is how great things are built. 2. Learning models, for example, are the new teaching strategy. Traditionally, teachers focus on “strategies” to “teach.” But the modern approach should have as much to do with what students access, when, how, and why as it does with “what students do in the lesson.” 3. Your students, first and foremost. 4. If you can’t make them curious, teach something else. Taskmasters seek compliance. 5. Teaching is a craft. Not only does this keep things fresh for students, but it keeps you sharp and relevant as an educator as this big world keeps on turning. 6. Know that it’s okay to think technology-first. 7. Technology. 8. When explaining, less is more. 9. Between standards and curriculum. 10.

http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/12-rules-of-great-teaching/

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Failing Forward: 21 Ideas To Use It In Your Classroom Failing Forward: 21 Ideas To Help Students Keep Their Momentum by Terry Heick “Failing Forward” is a relatively recent entry into our cultural lexicon–at least as far has headlines go anyway–that has utility for students and teachers. Popularized from the book of the same name, the idea behind failing forward is to see failing as a part of success rather than its opposite. Provided we keep moving and pushing and trying and reflecting, failure should, assuming we’re thinking clearly, lead to progress, So rather than failing and falling back, we fail forward. Tidy little metaphor.

iPad students learn the most important skill There’s something in the air and like the best of things, it’s exciting and scary at the same time. More and more articles like this one and this one and even this one proclaim the death of so many jobs over the next 20 years and magazines like this one explain why people not learning to adapt will be disastrous for everyone, especially current school kids. The major problem for school children is that traditionally, the classroom doesn’t demand they practice adapting to a situation or problem solve open-ended enough scenarios. 44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work 44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work by TeachThought Staff Educators are often admonished to design work that “leaves the classroom.” This is partly a push for authenticity. Work that is “real world” will naturally be more engaging to students because it has more chance to have credibility in their eyes, and usefulness in their daily lives.

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers Part of rethinking learning means rethinking the bits and pieces of the learning process–teaching strategies, writing pieces, etc. Which is what makes the following chart from Kathleen Cushman’s Fires in the Mind compelling. Rather than simply a list of alternatives to homework, it instead contextualizes the need for work at home (or, “homework”). It does this by taking typical classroom situations–the introduction of new material, demonstrating a procedure, etc.), and offering alternatives to traditional homework assignments. In fact, most of them are alternatives to homework altogether, including group brainstorming, modeling/think-alouds, or even the iconic pop-quiz.

Teaching Students to Reflect in Steps Self-assessment and reflection is key to the forward movement of a student’s learning and potential achievement. The more able a student is to talk about his/her learning in a cognizant way, the better chance he/she has in achieving his/her goals. This is why it is imperative for us to teach students how to do this effectively. We can’t merely assume that by saying to a student, “go reflect on this last assignment,” that he/she will know what we mean. It’s likely, they won’t. When we say reflection, students hear, “what did you like about this assignment?”

Literary Elements Map An updated version of the Story Map, this interactive best suits secondary students in literary study. The tool includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities, focusing on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development (shown at left). As with the Story Map, this interactive can be used in multiple contexts, whether they be author studies, genre studies, or thematic units, among others. Students can map out the key literary elements for a variety purposes, including response to literature or as a prewriting activity when composing their own fiction. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. Grades 5 – 9 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson

10 Online Tools to Engage Students in Studying Process - Fedena Blog When a teacher manages to engage his students in the learning process through interactive techniques, they are able to increase their focus and improve their critical thinking skills. Active participation is important for students to gain meaningful learning experiences in the classroom. How do you motivate your students to get engaged, when most of them don’t give you a chance to show how fun learning can be? The following online tools will support you on that mission! How-To-Study.com

Free Graphic Organizers for Teaching Literature and Reading Introduction As you probably already know, free graphic organizers are readily available on the Internet. However, access to quality organizers often requires either a monthly or an annual fee. Here you will find, what I think, are quality organizers WITHOUT monthly or annual fees. I dug into my own archives that I've accumulated over my 33 year career in search of organizers that focus on reading. Students want better digital credentials by Ron Bethke, eCampus News Assistant Editor, @eCN_RonBRead more by Ronald Bethke April 23rd, 2015 Innovation in online credentialing can help students better display learning outcomes and the value of their education to employers on social sites. According to a new whitepaper revealed by ed-tech company Parchment at Baltimore’s AACRAO conference on April 13th, a majority of students believe it would be useful to display official credentials on a social site. However, the report suggests their is a lot of room for innovation on the part of institutions.

ALL ABOUT ME WRITING PROMPTS These Writing Prompts are perfect anytime to make kids feel special and to sharpen up those writing skills. * The prompts are written with a range of writing skills in mind from those pre-writers who need to dictate to the story-tellers who need extra pages. I think it's important for print to be meaningful. That's why even a preschooler looks at a list for a camping trip and "reads" it back to anyone who will listen. Included in this unit are 16 writing prompts with really cute photographs or clip art.

Dangerous advice for young people A friend shared this on Facebook a few days ago: My comment was "harsh" and I found myself in the minority for thinking so... A number of years ago, there was a popular graduation address that had a whole string of these "grow up" realities and I carefully took the time to respond to each one. I'll be damned if I can find that, what I am sure was brilliant, bit of prose. But while looking for the exchange, I did run across this response to one of cartoonist Jessica Hagey's articles in Forbes: View topic - ESL for 3 yr olds in an english speaking preschool program Hello! I am a prek teacher in a childcare center. Our center just enrolled two new students in our 3's preschool classroom who are non-english speaking. If you can Google it, why teach it? With Google in the classroom, teachers should reimagine lessons Are any of us better than Google as an instructor? Is there anything value-added vis-à-vis your classroom teaching? Might one contribute a unique understanding, or presentation, of content?

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