background preloader

Money

Money
A sample picture of a fictional ATM card. The largest part of the world's money exists only as accounting numbers which are transferred between financial computers. Various plastic cards and other devices give individual consumers the power to electronically transfer such money to and from their bank accounts, without the use of currency. Money is any object or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts in a particular country or socio-economic context.[1][2][3] The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange; a unit of account; a store of value; and, occasionally in the past, a standard of deferred payment.[4][5] Any kind of object or verifiable record that fulfills these functions can be considered money. The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and usually includes bank money (the balance held in checking accounts and savings accounts). Etymology History Functions Types Related:  Common connotations of GREEN

Saint Patrick's Day Saint Patrick's Day, or the Feast of Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, "the Day of the Festival of Patrick"), is a cultural and religious holiday celebrated annually on 17 March, the death date of the most commonly-recognised patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461). Saint Patrick's Day was made an official Christian feast day in the early seventeenth century and is observed by the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion (especially the Church of Ireland),[4] the Eastern Orthodox Church and Lutheran Church. Saint Patrick's Day is a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland,[10] Northern Ireland,[11] Newfoundland and Labrador and Montserrat. Saint Patrick[edit] Much of what is known about St Patrick comes from the Declaration, which was allegedly written by Patrick himself. According to legend, Saint Patrick used the three-leaved shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity to Irish pagans. Celebration and traditions[edit] Wearing of the green[edit] Celebrations by region[edit]

Road Roads consist of one or two roadways (British English: carriageways), each with one or more lanes and any associated sidewalks (British English: pavement) and road verges. Roads that are available for use by the public may be referred to as public roads or as highways. Definitions[edit] The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) defines a road as "a line of communication (travelled way) using a stabilized base other than rails or air strips open to public traffic, primarily for the use of road motor vehicles running on their own wheels," which includes "bridges, tunnels, supporting structures, junctions, crossings, interchanges, and toll roads, but not cycle paths. United States[edit] In the United States, laws distinguish between public roads, which are open to public use, and private roads, which are privately controlled.[5] United Kingdom[edit] In the United Kingdom there is some ambiguity between the terms highway and road. History[edit] Design[edit]

Credit / Debt Management - Credit Repair Improve Credit Score and Pay Off Debt Spring (season) Colorful spring garden flowers Meteorologists generally define four seasons in many climatic areas: spring, summer, autumn (fall) and winter. These are demarcated by the values of their average temperatures on a monthly basis, with each season lasting three months. The three warmest months are by definition summer, the three coldest months are winter and the intervening gaps are spring and autumn. Spring, when defined in this manner, can start on different dates in different regions. In some regions in the Northern Hemisphere, the astronomical March equinox (varying between 19 and 21 March) is taken to mark the first day of spring, and the Northern solstice (around 21 June) is taken as the first day of summer. In East Asian Solar term, spring begins on 4 February and ends on 5 May. According to another tradition in the United States, 2 February, Candlemas, can be regarded as the start of spring if it is mild (see Groundhog Day). In India, Nowrouz is called Navreh or Navrojh.

Made In (Country of Origin) "Swiss Made" label on a TAG Heuer chronograph. Country of origin (COO), is the country of manufacture, production, or growth where an article or product comes from. There are differing rules of origin under various national laws and international treaties. Effects on consumers[edit] The effects of country of origin labeling on consumer purchasing have been extensively studied[1] The country of origin effect is also known as the "made-in image" and the "nationality bias. Several studies have shown that consumers tend to have a relative preference to products from their own country[7] or may have a relative preference for or aversion against products that originate from certain countries (so-called affinity[8] and animosity[9] countries). Labelling requirements[edit] The requirements for Country of Origin markings are complicated by the various designations which may be required such as "Made in X", "Product of X", "Manufactured in X" etc. COO marketing[edit] Use of the phrase "Made in..."

Envy Portrait of a Woman Suffering from Obsessive Envy; Jean Louis Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) Envy (from Latin invidia) is an emotion which "occurs when a person lacks another's superior quality, achievement, or possession and either desires it or wishes that the other lacked it"[1] Bertrand Russell said that envy was one of the most potent causes of unhappiness.[2] Not only is the envious person rendered unhappy by his envy, but they also wish to inflict misfortune on others. Although envy is generally seen as something negative, Russell also believed that envy was a driving force behind the movement towards democracy and must be endured to achieve a more just social system.[3] However, psychologists have recently suggested that there may be two types of envy: malicious envy and benign envy—benign envy being proposed as a type of positive motivational force.[4][5] Socioevolutionary view[edit] Comparison with jealousy[edit] Schadenfreude[edit] Regarding possessions or status[edit] "Father!

Telephone A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are not in the same vicinity of each other to be heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals suitable for transmission via cables or other transmission media over long distances, and replays such signals simultaneously in audible form to its user. The word telephone has been adapted into the vocabulary of many languages. It is derived from the Greek: τῆλε, tēle, "far" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice", together meaning "distant voice". First patented in 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell and further developed by many others, the telephone was the first device in history that enabled people to talk directly with each other across large distances. Although originally designed for simple voice communications, most modern telephones have many additional capabilities. History Basic principles Details of operation

Islam Islam (/ˈɪslɑːm/;[note 1] Arabic: الإسلام‎, al-ʾIslām IPA: [ælʔɪsˈlæːm] ( )[note 2]) is a monotheistic and Abrahamic religion articulated by the Qur'an, an Islamic holy book considered by its adherents to be the verbatim word of God (Allāh), and for the vast majority of adherents, also by the teachings and normative example (called the Sunnah and composed of hadith) of Muhammad (c. 570–8 June 632 CE), considered by most of them to be the last prophet of God. An adherent of Islam is called a Muslim. Most Muslims are of two denominations: Sunni (75–90%)[8] or Shia (10–20%).[9] About 13% of Muslims live in Indonesia,[10] the largest Muslim-majority country, 25% in South Asia,[10] 20% in the Middle East,[11] and 15% in Sub-Saharan Africa.[12] Sizable minorities are also found in Europe, China, Russia, and the Americas. Converts and immigrant communities are found in almost every part of the world (see Islam by country). Etymology and meaning Articles of faith God Angels Revelations Prophets

Sport Sport (or sports) is all forms of usually competitive physical activity which,[1] through casual or organised participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing entertainment to participants, and in some cases, spectators.[2] Hundreds of sports exist, from those requiring only two participants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals. Sport is generally recognised as activities which are based in physical athleticism or physical dexterity, with the largest major competitions such as the Olympic Games admitting only sports meeting this definition,[3] and other organisations such as the Council of Europe using definitions precluding activities without a physical element from classification as sports.[2] However, a number of competitive, but non-physical, activities claim recognition as mind sports. According to A.T. Meaning and usage Etymology Nomenclature Definition Competition History

Health Health is the level of functional or metabolic efficiency of a living organism. In humans, it is the general condition of a person's mind and body, usually meaning to be free from illness, injury or pain (as in "good health" or "healthy").[1] The World Health Organization (WHO) defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Systematic activities to prevent or cure health problems and promote good health in humans are undertaken by health care providers. Determinants[edit] More specifically, key factors that have been found to influence whether people are healthy or unhealthy include the following:[9][10][11] The concept of the "health field," as distinct from medical care, emerged from the Lalonde report from Canada. The environment is often cited as an important factor influencing the health status of individuals. Overview of potential issues[edit] Mental health[edit] Diet[edit]

Music This article is about music as a form of art. For history see articles for History of music and Music history. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of music vary according to culture and social context. Music ranges from strictly organized compositions (and their recreation in performance), through improvisational music to aleatoric forms. Music can be divided into genres and subgenres, although the dividing lines and relationships between music genres are often subtle, sometimes open to personal interpretation, and occasionally controversial. Within the arts, music may be classified as a performing art, a fine art, and auditory art. To many people in many cultures, music is an important part of their way of life. Etymology The word derives from Greek μουσική (mousike; "art of the Muses").[4] Music as form of art Jean-Gabriel Ferlan performing at a 2008 concert at the collège-lycée Saint-François Xavier Composition Notation Play Improvisation Theory History

Illness Death due to disease is called death by natural causes. There are four main types of disease: pathogenic disease, deficiency disease, hereditary disease, and physiological disease. Diseases can also be classified as communicable and non-communicable. The deadliest disease in humans is ischemic heart disease (blood flow obstruction),[2] followed by cerebrovascular disease and lower respiratory infections respectively.[3] Terminology[edit] Concepts[edit] In many cases, the terms disease, disorder, morbidity and illness are used interchangeably.[4] In some situations, specific terms are considered preferable. Disease Illness Illness and sickness are generally used as synonyms for disease.[6] However, this term is occasionally used to refer specifically to the patient's personal experience of his or her disease.[7][8] Disorder In medicine, a disorder is a functional abnormality or disturbance. Medical condition A medical condition is a broad term that includes all diseases and disorders. Morbidity

Related: