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Photos Of Mongolian Tribe Show Deep Bond With Animals

Photos Of Mongolian Tribe Show Deep Bond With Animals
The Dukha tribe from Mongolia are one of the few remaining “lost” tribes that have completely escaped the realities of the modern world. They are best known as reindeer herders, but their connection with the animal world goes beyond reindeer. The magical photographs were taken by Hamid Sardar Afkhami who travelled to Khovsgol, Mongolia to photograph one of the few Dukha families that remain. Matadornetwork.com reports: The children of the tribe are raised surrounded by reindeer, and they build a close connection. The Dukha do not typically eat the reindeer unless the animals are no longer capable of helping them hunt or travel.

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