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Are any of these the Web's next big thing?

Are any of these the Web's next big thing?
Internet start-up ventures ply their wares at LeWeb conference in ParisEntrepreneurs hope their innovations can match success of Twitter or FacebookInventions range from Wi-Fi bathroom scales to 3D instant messengers Paris, France (CNN) -- With more than 2,000 Internet movers and shakers, the LeWeb conference in Paris is an ideal spot for start-up ventures to hoping to attract the investment and attention that will propel them to Twitter or Facebook-style success. A series of stalls across the venue -- a giant arts complex converted from a disused morgue -- saw fresh-faced entrepreneurs demonstrating gadgets and applications they insisted will change the way we interface with the Internet. These might just be the inventions that everyone will be talking about next year or they could simply slip below the radar. Either way, all will face the same question still being leveled at today's household names -- can they make money? "Will it be successful? Netvibes

http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/ptech/12/10/internet.future/index.html

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The 101 Most Useful Websites on the Internet Here are some of the most useful websites on the internet that you may not know about. These web sites, well most of them, solve at least one problem really well and they all have simple web addresses (URLs) that you can memorize thus saving you a trip to Google. And if you find this list useful, also check out the expanded version – The Most Useful Websites – which now offers a collection of 150+ undiscovered and incredibly useful websites to enhance your productivity.

Basics of Cloud Computing Michael Wood Michael R. Wood is a Business Process Improvement & IT Strategist Independent Consultant. Michael is creator of the business process-improvement methodology called HELIX and founder of The Natural Intelligence Group, a strategy, process improvement, and technology consulting company. Pearltrees Visualizes How You Organize the Web This post is part of Mashable's Spark of Genius series, which highlights a unique feature of startups. If you would like to have your startup considered for inclusion, please see the details here. The series is made possible by Microsoft BizSpark. Name: Pearltrees

Pearltrees grabs another €1.3 million Chances are, you’ve already heard of Pearltrees - possibly because the company caught attention when it sponsored LeWeb in Paris or more recently the Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco. And if you haven’t, now is the right time to acquaint yourself with the service: the French start-up founded in 2008 has just scored another €1.3 million in funding to change the way you navigate the web. The social book-marking and navigation start-up – which allows users to organize and share their favorite websites via a system of digital “pearls” – has raised roughly €3.5 million to date. The inital €1 million raised was in June 2008 followed by €1.2 in June of the following year (in addition to some public funding from the French government).

Pearltrees launches Twitter sync and reveals its social system [France] Paris-based Pearltrees has been catching interest around the web the last few days not least because a gaggle influential Silicon Valley bloggers have descended on Paris for Le Web, but mainly because of its interesting model for visually mapping how people collect and share information on the Web. But today the startup opens the kimono on its full system. They will announce two new things today: Twitter synchronization (enabling a user to create a pearl automatically from Twitter and to tweet automatically from their new Pearltrees), Pearltrees search, Real time discussion and connection. The other new aspect announced today on stage at Le Web is the Pearltrees Social System. But to explain first, here’s a new video they just released:

Trans-Atlantic Bandwidth Crunch coming During the dot-com boom, so many undersea cable delivering the Internet traversed the bottom of the ocean between the U.S. and Europe that bandwidth prices plummeted and providers of submarine cables filed for bankruptcy. But those cables may soon no longer be enough to satisfy the global demand for bandwidth between the two continents, according to research out today from TeleGeography. The research firm estimates that bandwidth requirements will grow 33 percent between 2008 and 2015, and trans-Atlantic capacity will be exhausted by 2014.

OpenDocument The Open Document Format for Office Applications (ODF), also known as OpenDocument, is an XML-based file format for spreadsheets, charts, presentations and word processing documents. It was developed with the aim of providing an open, XML-based file format specification for office applications.[2] In addition to being an OASIS standard, version 1.1 is published as an ISO/IEC international standard, ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1.[5][6] The Curation Buzz... And PearlTrees Posted by Tom Foremski - April 12, 2010 My buddy Dave Galbraith is the first person I remember to first start talking about curation and the Internet, several years ago. He even named his company Curations, and created a tool/site for curation: Wists. And his site SmashingTelly - is great example of curation, a hand-picked collection of great videos. Today, much is written about curation and the Internet but it all seems mostly talk because we don't really have the tools we need.

Pearltrees Visualizes TechCrunch Disrupt Did TechCrunch Disrupt blow right past you? I’m pretty sure I’m going to have to watch that video of Eric Schmidt’s keynote about five times before I actually understand what was going on, and don’t even get me started on “Dancing Erick.” For those that are likewise, um disrupted, data curation tool Pearltrees has created the above tree visualization, which allows you to relive the three day info hurricane on your own terms by clicking through any of the available “pearls” or data nodes. For the uninitiated, Pearltrees is a free visual curation tool that allows you to organize the web into subscribable clusters, either by pulling in data from your browser or by crawling what you follow on Twitter. You can embed a Pearltree (like we have) on any website and it will update automatically as you add more content (like “Dancing Erick.” Hint.

Le Web Gears Up Paris-based entrepreneur Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry is covering the Le Web conference for us this year. Here's what to look for. Le Web is the brainchild of Seesmic founder Loic Le Meur, and takes part each year in Paris. (This year, it's this Wednesday and Thursday.) It includes both a roster of international/Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, investors and execs as well as French web stars.

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