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Constructionism (learning theory)

Constructionism (learning theory)
Seymour Papert Seymour Papert defined constructionism in a proposal to the National Science Foundation entitled Constructionism: A New Opportunity for Elementary Science Education as follows: "The word constructionism is a mnemonic for two aspects of the theory of science education underlying this project. From constructivist theories of psychology we take a view of learning as a reconstruction rather than as a transmission of knowledge. Then we extend the idea of manipulative materials to the idea that learning is most effective when part of an activity the learner experiences as constructing is a meaningful product.".[2] As Papert and Idit Harel say at the start of Situating Constructionism, "It is easy enough to formulate simple catchy versions of the idea of constructionism; for example, thinking of it as 'learning-by-making'. Here is one type of theory that constructivist learning theory can be applied in a classroom setting. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Jump up ^ Cakir, M. (2008).

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INTENSE STUDY TIPS Boy oh boy.... I'm going to attempt to get all of my study tips from the past and present into this post. I've been getting emails/tweets/questions asking for my secrets. What if We Really Cared About Teacher Preparation? Abstract Efforts to reform teacher education in recent years have focused on demands for higher quality candidates and indicators of rigorous preparation without careful consideration of the total policy environment in which such preparation must take place. In the era of test based accountability, efforts to recruit, prepare and induct qualified and passionate new teachers are severely hampered by contradictory and high stakes priorities enacted by state level policy makers. In this article, I locate the different policy pressures that make thoughtful and effective teacher preparation less likely and explain what teacher preparation would look like if we took a systemic and developmental approach to teacher education that recognized how teachers learn. It is, of course, easy to criticize the reform plans for teacher education that are in various stages of implementation in New Jersey. Recruitment

Constructivism Jean Piaget: founder of Constructivism In past centuries, constructivist ideas were not widely valued due to the perception that children's play was seen as aimless and of little importance. Jean Piaget did not agree with these traditional views, however. He saw play as an important and necessary part of the student's cognitive development and provided scientific evidence for his views. Social constructivism Social constructivism is a sociological theory of knowledge that applies the general philosophical constructivism into social settings, wherein groups construct knowledge for one another, collaboratively creating a small culture of shared artifacts with shared meanings. When one is immersed within a culture of this sort, one is learning all the time about how to be a part of that culture on many levels. It is emphasised that culture plays a large role in the cognitive development of a person. Its origins are largely attributed to Lev Vygotsky.

How To Learn More Outside Of Class Than You Ever Could Inside It I’m going to give you a list of seemingly random things, and I want to you try and guess how they’re related. Ready? Here we go: Automatic Reference Counting (ARC) is a feature in iOS 5 that allows the compiler to do memory management automatically, so you don’t have to.Out of all high school students that graduate in the bottom 40 percent of their class, 76 percent will not will not have a college degree within eight years.しんぶんでしたか? いいえ、しんぶんじゃりません。

Imagine This: Creative Play and 21st-Century Learning I bought my six-year-old daughter a Black & Decker LI3100 Compact Lithium-Ion Rechargeable Screwdriver. I tell her it's critical for defending our Tampa, Florida neighborhood against the coming zombie apocalypse. Credit Rob van Nood and his design-thinking-heavy Tinker Camp in Portland, Oregon for the zombie angle. It's a brilliant mechanism for adding urgency and creative play to a curriculum straight out of the maker movement. My kids (ages six, four, and one) can't seem to get enough. They contemplate our house's vulnerabilities and imagine tactics that zombies might use to break the perimeter. Project-based learning Project-based learning (PBL) is considered an alternative to paper-based, rote memorization, teacher-led classrooms. Proponents of project-based learning cite numerous benefits to the implementation of these strategies in the classroom including a greater depth of understanding of concepts, broader knowledge base, improved communication and interpersonal/social skills, enhanced leadership skills, increased creativity, and improved writing skills. John Dewey initially promoted the idea of "learning by doing." John Dewey, 1902

Connectivism Connectivism is a hypothesis of learning which emphasizes the role of social and cultural context. Connectivism is often associated with and proposes a perspective similar to Vygotsky's 'zone of proximal development' (ZPD), an idea later transposed into Engeström's (2001) Activity theory.[1] The relationship between work experience, learning, and knowledge, as expressed in the concept of ‘connectivity, is central to connectivism, motivating the theory's name.[2] It is somewhat similar to Bandura's Social Learning Theory that proposes that people learn through contact. The phrase "a learning theory for the digital age"[3] indicates the emphasis that connectivism gives to technology's effect on how people live, communicate and learn. Nodes and links[edit] The central aspect of connectivism is the metaphor of a network with nodes and connections.[4] In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node such as an organization, information, data, feelings, and images.

The lesson you never got taught in school: How to learn! A paper published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest evaluated ten techniques for improving learning, ranging from mnemonics to highlighting and came to some surprising conclusions. The report is quite a heavy document so I’ve summarised the techniques below based on the conclusions of the report regarding effectiveness of each technique. Be aware that everyone thinks they have their own style of learning (they don't, according to the latest research), and the evidence suggests that just because a technique works or does not work for other people does not necessarily mean it will or won’t work well for you. If you want to know how to revise or learn most effectively you will still want to experiment on yourself a little with each technique before writing any of them off.

What Is A Personal Learning Network? What Is A Personal Learning Network? by TeachThought Staff What is a personal learning network, or rather a Personal Learning Network? How about a Professional Learning Network? In the video below, Marc-André Lalande offers a concise, useful definition that simplifies the idea from hashtags and movements and social engagement and badges and, well, all the buzzwords you hear, into a clear explanation that works not just within education, but any field. Hybrid Course Blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path or pace.[1] While still attending a “brick-and-mortar” school structure, face-to-face classroom methods are combined with computer-mediated activities.[2] Proponents of blending learning cite the opportunity for data collection and customization of instruction and assessment as two major benefits of this approach.[3] Schools with blended learning models may also choose to reallocate resources to boost student achievement outcomes.[4] Terminology[edit] History of the term[edit] The concept of blended learning has been around for a long time, but its terminology was not firmly established until around the beginning of the 21st century. Word usage and context[edit]

Social network service A social networking service (also social networking site or SNS) is a platform to build social networks or social relations among people who share interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. A social network service consists of a representation of each user (often a profile), his or her social links, and a variety of additional services. Social network sites are web-based services that allow individuals to create a public profile, to create a list of users with whom to share connections, and view and cross the connections within the system.[1] Most social network services are web-based and provide means for users to interact over the Internet, such as e-mail and instant messaging.

Books.Blog – Skip Graduate School, Save $32,000, Do This Instead Three years ago, I invested $32,000 and the better part of two years at the University of Washington for a master's degree in International Studies. The verdict? It wasn't a complete waste of time and money. Once I accepted that 80% of the course requirements were designed to keep people busy, I enjoyed the other 20% of the work. If you're strictly interested in learning, however, you may want to get a better return-on-investment than I did.

8 Steps To Teacher-Led, Digital PD 8 Steps To Teacher-Led, Digital PD by TeachThought Staff Professional development for teachers is a beautiful thing. While many professionals work either in isolation or total stagnation, educators are constantly given new tools to become better at their craft. National-level conferences like ISTE and ASCD, district PD, school PD, professional learning communities, data teams, “PD-style staff meetings,” books, blogs—there are so many incredible resources being updated literally as you read this, that the challenge is more about knowing where to start than finding suitable content. But beyond any isolated parcel of teacher improvement lies social media.