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Piero Scaruffi's knowledge base

Piero Scaruffi's knowledge base

http://www.scaruffi.com/

Related:  Lundu, Fado e SambaDiscovery

Top 100: Greatest Songs (of All Time) It’s hard to come up with a list of the 100 greatest songs of all time and not leave people out, or be called a “son of a bitch” and other unflattering things by your readers. Nevertheless, inStash goes where not even Rolling Stone magazine has dared to tread. While the famed music publication needed a top 500 to feel comfortable even undertaking such a task, inStash honors the legends of rockers past, country’s greatest crooners, and the songs of today with 100 must-haves for your iPod or MP3 player. Don’t think of this as a top 100 greatest songs so much as a 100 essentials. Ratings themselves are always subjective. This is just inStash’s way of saying that if we could take only a century mark of songs with us through our remaining years, these are the ones we’d pick.

The Sacred Geometry Of Music The Sacred Geometry Of Music by Andrew Lorimer Music uses the laws of vibration to manifest aurally what exists at the center of everything. Into our reality springs a non-visual harmonic law that is universal. The notes and intervals of music speak directly to the chakra centers and causes them to vibrate in harmony to the vibration of a string or vocal chords, speakers moving through the air, or the sound of someone’s lips making a farting noise through a metal tube.

Lundu (dance) Lundu (also spelled landu or landum) is a style of Afro-Brazilian music and dance [1] with its origins in the African Bantu and Portuguese people. The interconnectedness of Lusophone countries dates back to the Atlantic Slave Trade, between Portugal, Brazil and regions of Africa.[2] In the 15th century, the Portuguese were the primary exporters of African slaves to the Americas, and with slaves came their musical traditions.[3] Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, there was a massive Brazilian presence in Angola, enabling a cultural exchange between the two Portuguese colonies.[4] This exchange enabled subtle amalgamations of musical styles between Angola, Brazil and other African slave trade countries.[5] The establishment of a creole population in Brazil led to further cultural developments in language, religion and art.[6] Jump up ^ Budasz, Rogério (February 2007). "Black guitar-players and early African-Iberian music in Portugal and Brazil".

10 Weird and Wonderful Women Musicians "There is nothing new under the sun," said King Solomon. He obviously hadn't met Nina Hagen. Or any of the other women on this list, all musicians with talent, originality, charisma and intelligence––not to mention a wicked sartorial style! These women are all their own persons, confident in their individuality, wherever it may take them. And, yes, they're all weird, but not in a contrived or derivative manner. 50 Greatest Guitar Solos Jimmy Page. Jack White. Jimi Hendrix: some of the music world's greatest ever axe-shredders (and that's only the Js). Fundamental to a band's sound, the guitarist can make or break a record and - if they're really something special - they can deliver a solo that elevates it to heights previously unimagined. Here, we celebrate those in the latter camp, who only needed six strings to change the world.

Multimedia Sixties 1968 Music - A retro nostalgia look at music 1968 Song of the year With an album behind them and an almost hit with Down on Me, Big Brother and the Holding Company with Janis Joplin made a big splash at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, and the next year came the hit album Cheap Thrills with the big hit single Piece of My Heart and of course the unforgettable album cover by Robert Crumb. Piece of my Heart was so big a hit that Joplin left Big Brother to go on her own before the year ended

10½ Favorite Albums of 2012 by Maria Popova By popular demand, here is a music equivalent to complement those favorite books of 2012 — a highly subjective and hopelessly non-exhaustive selection of the 10 or so albums on heaviest rotation this year, many of which you might recognize from past Literary Jukebox installments. My Head Is An Animal (iTunes; UK) by Of Monsters and Men The songs of summer Memorial Day Weekend fills us with restless anticipation of how we will spend the long, hot days ahead, but it also brings fond memories of summers past, each one marked by a ubiquitous song that still has the power to bring us back to that time. Travel through the last 100 years to discover which summer songs were either released or peaked in popularity during the summer of their respective years. Some are about the summer or the stuff of summer: parties, picnics, fleeting love, nostalgia or fun. Some have that summer feeling in sound alone. Many are relevant to their times.

World music World music is a musical category encompassing many different styles of music from around the world, including traditional music, neotraditional music, and music where more than one cultural tradition intermingle. World music's inclusive nature and elasticity as a musical category pose obstacles to a universal definition, but its ethic of interest in the culturally exotic is encapsulated in fRoots magazine's description of the genre as "local music from out there".[1] The term originated in the late 20th century[citation needed] as a marketing category and academic classification for non-Western traditional music. Globalization has facilitated the expansion of world music's audiences and scope.

Cambodian Surf Rockers Were Awesome, but the Khmer Rouge Killed Them Cambodian surf rock artist Ros Sereysothea When a friend invited me to a “Cambodian surf party” in his run-down apartment in Sheffield, England, I figured he was just being a pretentious idiot. It’s a retro novelty, I thought. The kind of thing people who collect surrealist-noise vinyl lose their minds over because it’s kitsch and obscure. Upon arrival in Sheffield—where there was a distinct lack of anything Cambodian—my drunk friend rushed straight over to his laptop and loaded a song up on YouTube. “Listen to this,” he said.

Psychedelic sixties The White Rabbit in Wonderland (East Totem West, 1967) Art By Joe McHugh Nick Mason David Gilmour

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