background preloader

Liste de voies romaines

Liste de voies romaines

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_de_voies_romaines

Related:  Empire romainCartes Romaines et voies de communicationVoies romainesold mapsOld Names

Catégorie: Cartes de l'Empire romain Cancel Edit Delete Preview revert Text of the note (may include Wiki markup) Could not save your note (edit conflict or other problem). Please copy the text in the edit box below and insert it manually by editing this page. Upon submitting the note will be published multi-licensed under the terms of the CC-BY-SA-3.0 license and of the GFDL, versions 1.2, 1.3, or any later version. See our terms of use for more details.

Ancient World Mapping Center The center supports a variety of ongoing projects including: Current Projects: Antiquity À-la-carte The Antiquity À-la-carte application is an interactive digital map of the ancient world built using open source software and data derived from The Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World and Pleiades. The project seeks to make an interactive, manipulable map of the ancient Mediterranean world intended primarily for students and their instructors. The application allows for an extensive range of custom criteria that can tailor the map to meet almost any needs from the archaic to the late Roman periods.

Roman roads in Britain Roman roads in Britain are highways - mainly designed for military use - created by the Roman Army during the four centuries (43 – 410 AD) that Britain was a province of the Roman Empire. It is estimated that the Romans constructed and maintained about 2,000 mi (3,200 km) of paved trunk roads (i.e. surfaced highways) throughout the country,[1] although most of the known network was complete by 180 AD. The primary function of the network was to allow rapid movement of troops and military supplies, but it also provided vital infrastructure for commerce, trade and the transportation of goods.

herodotus timemap Book 1, Ch. 1 This is the display of the inquiry of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, so that things done by man not be forgotten in time, and that great and marvelous deeds, some displayed by the Hellenes, some by the barbarians, not lose their glory, including among others what was the cause of their waging war on each other.The Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute. These (they say) came to our seas from the sea which is called Red, and having settled in the country which they still occupy, at once began to make long voyages. Among other places to which they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise, they came to Argos,which was at that time preeminent in every way among the people of what is now called Hellas.

tabula peutingeriana Tabula Peutingeriana (section)—top to bottom: Dalmatian coast, Adriatic Sea, southern Italy, Sicily, African Mediterranean coast The Tabula Peutingeriana (Peutinger table, Peutinger Map) is an illustrated itinerarium (in effect, a road map) showing the cursus publicus, the road network in the Roman Empire. The original map (of which this is a unique copy) was last revised in the fourth or early fifth century.[1] It covers Europe, North Africa and parts of Asia (the Middle East, Persia, India). The map is named after Konrad Peutinger, a German 15–16th-century humanist and antiquarian. The tabula is thought to date from the fifth century.[2] It shows the city of Constantinople, founded in 328, yet it still shows Pompeii, not rebuilt after the eruption of Vesuvius in 79.

AWMC: Strabo Map x The Strabo Application is a georeferenced, interactive digital map of the Ancient Mediterranean World to accompany the text of the Geography translated by Duane W. Roller and published by Cambridge University Press (2014). The application is produced by the Ancient World Mapping Center (AWMC) at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and marks all locatable settlements, features, and peoples mentioned by Strabo, as determined by the translator and presented according to his specifications. The application works best with Firefox, Chrome, or Safari.

Viae Romanae Trajanic Milestone from Kalambaki, near Philippi in Macedonia Adams (1993) 33-37. Miller, Konrad, Itineraria Romana: Römische Reisewege an der Hand der Tabula Peutingeriana (Stuttgart 1916 [Roma: Bretschneider 1964] ). Tabula Peutingeriana (Bibliotheca Augustana) Cuntz, O., Itineraria Romana, Vol.1: Itineraria Antonini Augusti et Burdigalense (Leipzig: Teubner 1929). Geyer, P. (ed.), Itinera Hierosolymitana, Saeculi IIII-VIII (Itinerarium Burdigalense) (Prague-Vienna-Leipzig 1898) [CSEL, 39] Bordeaux Pilgrim - Map I: Europe Parthey, G. and M. Pinder, Itinerarium Antonini (Berlin 1848).

awmc - ancient world mapping center Keeping abreast of the ever-expanding set of resources relevant to the geography and mapping of the ancient world is a Herculean task and this page does not attempt to do that, rather it aims to provide a basic set of initial references for the community. AWMC is always happy to consult with scholars and community members seeking to find certain, specialized resources. Print Resources Compendia W. Smith. 1854. history and geography of europe: euratlas.net Historical Maps Euratlas Periodis Historical Atlas of Europe History of Europe A sequence of 21 maps showing the European states as they were at the end of each century from 1 to 2000. Aegean Area History Detailed maps, created with Euratlas Periodis Expert, showing the history of the Aegean area. 40 maps that explain the Roman Empire by Timothy B. Lee on August 19, 2014 Two thousand years ago, on August 19, 14 AD, Caesar Augustus died. He was Rome's first emperor, having won a civil war more than 40 years earlier that transformed the dysfunctional Roman Republic into an empire.

Roman roads - Wikipedia Roman roads (Latin: viae; singular: via meaning way) were physical infrastructure vital to the maintenance and development of the Roman state, and were built from about 300 BC through the expansion and consolidation of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire.[1] They provided efficient means for the overland movement of armies, officials, and civilians, and the inland carriage of official communications and trade goods.[2] Roman roads were of several kinds, ranging from small local roads to broad, long-distance highways built to connect cities, major towns and military bases. These major roads were often stone-paved and metaled, cambered for drainage, and were flanked by footpaths, bridleways and drainage ditches. They were laid along accurately surveyed courses, and some were cut through hills, or conducted over rivers and ravines on bridgework. Sections could be supported over marshy ground on rafted or piled foundations.[3][4]

Medieval Demographics Made Easy Fantasy worlds come in many varieties, from the "hard core" medieval-simulation school to the more fanciful realms of high fantasy, with alabaster castles and jeweled gardens in the place of the more traditional muddy squalor. Despite their differences, these share a vital common element: ordinary people. Most realms of fantasy, no matter how baroque or magical, can not get by without a supply of ordinary farmers, merchants, quarreling princes and palace guards.

Related: