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Talkning about the weather

Talkning about the weather

http://www.theenglishstudent.com/blog/talking-about-different-types-of-weather

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Intermediate Adjective Antonyms Sorry, this is a flash-based game that requires Adobe Flash Player. Many of these games will run on mobile devices with VocabularySpellingCity apps. For Apple devices Available for Android Learn More about www.VocabularySpellingCity.com! Teaching spelling and vocabulary is easy with VocabularySpellingCity! Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words Linking & Connecting Words It is essential to understand how Linking Words, as a part of speech, can be used to combine ideas in writing - and thus ensure that ideas within sentences and paragraphs are elegantly connected - for the benefit of the reader. This will help to improve your writing (e.g. essay, comment, summary (scientific) review, (research) paper, letter, abstract, report, thesis, etc.). It is also fundamental to be aware of the sometimes subtle meaning of these "small" words within the English language. "Linking Words" is used as a term to denote a class of English words which are employed to link or connect parts of speech or even whole sentences. They are also called connecting words.

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' A posthaven user upvoted this post. — habebaakiar 3 years ago — barcahaters 3 years ago — Jan Arzooman 3 years ago — Y.Babadogan 3 years ago Tools for Educators.com - Board Game Maker, printable board games, 100% customizable Tools for Educators offers to use as resources for lessons, lesson plans and printable materials for English classes .

British Accents and Dialects Wikimedia The United Kingdom is probably the most dialect-obsessed nation in the world. With countless accents shaped by thousands of years of history, there are few English-speaking nations with as many varieties of language in such a small space. Feeling Words Emotional Intelligence | Emotional Literacy Feeling Words / Emotion WordsWords Describing Feelings and Emotions * = Newly created words Thanks to all the people who have contributed new words. I am sorry but it has proven impractical for me to name them all.

How Much Is It: A Shopping Lesson Plan by Chris Gunn Time: Up to 4 hours depending on how much the teacher wishes to use. Materials: To give to the students. Introductory Vocabulary Exercises. Information Gap WORD GAMES Ammon Shea, a 37-year-old former furniture remover in New York, spent 12 months conquering what he describes as the Everest of dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), by ploughing through 20 volumes, 21,730 pages and 59 million words (read more here). We can only guess how much of what he read has stayed between his ears, which is, at times, quite a challenge for our students. Luckily for the latter, though, their word lists are much shorter. We can use some magic formulae for helping words stick in the head trying to come up with clever associations, getting students to use definitions, determining a rate at which words should be learnt without falling out of their heads, creating some “brain surprises” (see more here), or resort to some oldies but goldies – word games. These are some pen and paper games that require next to no time to prepare and might be used to get students to look through their word lists again and again, and help them retain new vocabulary.

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask- question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful- dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Cleaning supplies, household cleaning and Laundry - Dictionary for Kids Rating: 4.6/5 (10 votes cast) Picture Dictionary – People – Cleaning supplies, household cleaning and Laundry Housework

Origins of English: "Our Language is at Present in a State of Anarchy" In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, England’s population grew rapidly: between 1550 and 1650, it doubled, reaching 5 million. Reflecting this growth a number of new words entered into English: ghetto (1611), suburban (1625), and dialect (1570s). Concerned about the apparent anarchy of the language and the lack of any standards regarding grammar, spelling, and pronunciation, the Royal Society set up a committee for improving the English language in 1664. The model for the committee was the Academy which had been founded in France some 30 years earlier. Those who promoted this idea included the poet and critic John Dryden and polymath John Evelyn. With regard to the possible goals of this special committee, linguist David Crystal, in his delightful little book The Fight for English: How Language Pundits Ate, Shot, and Left, writes:

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen.

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