background preloader

"If" Rudyard Kipling

"If" Rudyard Kipling
Related:  figurative artPoesia

Some Moral Dilemmas The Trolley Problem, not in Grassian. Suggested by Philippa Foot (1920-2010), daughter of Esther, the daughter of President Grover Cleveland, but of British birth because of her father, William Sidney Bence Bosanquet. A trolley is running out of control down a track. In its path are five people who have been tied to the track by a mad philosopher. Fortunately, you could flip a switch, which will lead the trolley down a different track to safety. Unfortunately, there is a single person tied to that track. This is a classic "right vs. good" dilemma. The Costly Underwater Tunnel Compare: 112 men were killed during the construction of Hoover Dam on the Nevada-Arizona border (the "official" number was 98, but others had died from causes more difficult to identify -- or easier to ignore -- like by carbon monoxide poisoning): The first to die was a surveyor, J.G.

The most beautiful death Brave New World novelist Aldous Huxley was diagnosed with cancer in 1960, at which point his health slowly began to deteriorate. On his deathbed in November of 1963, just as he was passing away, Aldous — a man who for many years had been fascinated with the effects of psychedelic drugs since being introduced to mescaline in 1953 — asked his wife Laura to administer him with LSD. She agreed. The following letter — an incredibly moving, detailed account of Aldous's last days — was written by Laura just days after her husband's death and sent to his older brother Julian. Transcript follows. 6233 Mulholland Highway Los Angeles 28, California December 8, 1963Dearest Julian and Juliette:There is so much I want to tell you about the last week of Aldous' life and particularly the last day.

Rime - Dictionnaire des rimes discussing How To Cite Smarthistory We recommend that you cite Smarthistory.org content like other online sources. In the discipline of art history, we generally use Chicago or Turabian as style guidelines.If you are citing text from Smarthistory.org, include the following in your foot or endnote:1) The author’s name, for example: Dr. Joseph Dauben Please note: In many cases, no author is listed and you only need to include 2-5 below 2) The title of the page, for example: “Applications of Linear Perspective in the Renaissance”3) The name of the website, for example: Smarthistory.org4) Date accessed, for example: Accessed October 25, 20115) The URL for the object or subject page, for example: Example citation: Dr. Example citation: “Expressionism & Kirchner’s Street, Dresden” (Video), Smarthistory.org, Speakers: Dr.

Fiction Truer Than Fact: A Haunting Autobiographical Novel Sarah Manguso's latest book is called The Guardians. I like autobiographies that approach their subjects insidiously. My favorite ones begin as a study of someone or something else. Then, partway through, the author realizes he's the subject. And my very favorite autobiographies are the ones, in all their particularity, that might as well be about me — or you, or anyone. Sylvia grew from an autobiographical essay into a novella subtitled A Fictional Memoir. "The brush swept down and ripped free until, abruptly, she quit brushing, stepped into the living room, dropped onto the couch, leaned back against the brick wall, and went totally limp. The woman is Sylvia Bloch, indeed the name of the author's first wife, described in the book as "abnormally bright" but prone to violent rages, "like a madwoman imitating a college student." Leonard presents the compulsive love affair alongside his own compulsive record of it. hide captionSarah Manguso is also the author of The Two Kinds of Decay.

Alchimie poétique : la boue et l'or Document A À Paul Demeny À Douai. Charleville, le 15 mai 1871. [...] Je dis qu'il faut être voyant, se faire voyant. Le Poète se fait voyant par un long, immense et raisonné dérèglement de tous les sens. A. Document B À moi. Depuis longtemps je me vantais de posséder tous les paysages possibles, et trouvais dérisoires les célébrités de la peinture et de la poésie moderne. J'aimais les peintures idiotes, dessus de portes, décors, toiles de saltimbanques, enseignes, enluminures populaires ; la littérature démodée, latin d'église, livres érotiques sans orthographe, romans de nos aïeules, contes de fées, petits livres de l'enfance, opéras vieux, refrains niais, rythmes naïfs. Je rêvais croisades, voyages de découvertes dont on n'a pas de relations, républiques sans histoires, guerres de religion étouffées, révolutions de mœurs, déplacements de races et de continents : je croyais à tous les enchantements. J'inventai la couleur des voyelles ! Ce fut d'abord une étude. Ma santé fut menacée. A.

Cabala mineralis manuscript The Alchemy web site on Levity.com The mine of our mercury is our saltpetre not that of the vulgar. Our sharp bitter vitriol is not that of the vulgar Our ammoniac is not that of the vulgar The sprout of Mercury. Our mercury. Two to more than three parts of our mercury dissolve one part of the common moon or sun, and they become inseparably one spongeous porous body, which is called our moon or sun, not the common. The sophic calcination of the sun. The sophic putrefaction. The Germination of vegetation. The white sulphur. Volatilisation through liquid. Volatilisation through dryness. The red sulphur. Another fermenation, the Imbibition of the stone. The stone of the wise. Let the eternal God be praised and may his grace be unceasing. The Second Book The 100 Most Influential Books Ever Written (book) The 100 Most Influential Books Ever Written: The History of Thought from Ancient Times to Today (1998) is a book of intellectual history written by Martin Seymour-Smith, a British poet, critic, and biographer.[1] The list included the books such as, Upanishads, Hebrew Bible, I Ching, Kabbalah, Candide, The World as Will and Idea, among others. See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Seymour-Smith, Martin (1998). The 100 most influential books ever written : the history of thought from ancient times to today. External links[edit] The list

Alchimie du verbe d'Une saison en enfer de Rimbaud expliqué A moi. L'histoire d'une de mes folies. Depuis longtemps je me vantais de posséder tous les paysages possibles, et trouvais dérisoires les célébrités de la peinture et de la poésie moderne. J'aimais les peintures idiotes, dessus de portes, décors, toiles de saltimbanques, enseignes, enluminures populaires ; la littérature démodée, latin d'église, livres érotiques sans orthographe, romans de nos aïeules, contes de fées, petits livres de l'enfance, opéras vieux, refrains niais, rythmes naïfs. Je rêvais croisades, voyages de découvertes dont on n'a pas de relations, républiques sans histoires, guerres de religion étouffées, révolutions de mœurs, déplacements de races et de continents : je croyais à tous les enchantements. J'inventai la couleur des voyelles ! Ce fut d'abord une étude. Que pouvais-je boire dans cette jeune Oise, - Ormeaux sans voix, gazon sans fleurs, ciel couvert ! Je faisais une louche enseigne d'auberge Pleurant, je voyais de l'or - et ne pus boire Oh ! Mes faims, tournez.

Time management for artists I think a lot of us, especially if we are doing this full time, have difficulties in managing our time properly. Its difficult to organize a day when there are 20 things you'd like to paint, emails to respond too, late night deadlines that screw up the next days plans, people knocking on your door thinking that because you are a self employed artist and don;t punch a "normal" clock, you don't have any proper responsibilities and can drop anything you are doing because someone needs a favour. We have commissions to handle, money to manage, shows to submit to. Some of us (me ) actually live in the studio so the line between what is work and rest gets blurred easily resulting in nothing really getting done. Some have rolodexes, some have schedules, "to do" lists that they make before they go to bed, big charts, or keep everything in their head. What are some of your tips, and what have you learned to avoid throughout your career? I am probably the last person to speak on time management.

Famous Last Words: Our 20 Favorite Final Lines in Literature Endings, as we all know, are important. An entire novel can be ruined by a disappointing ending, but by the same token, an entire novel can be made by a wonderful one. We’ve already given you a rundown of our favorite opening lines in literature, but since every beginning needs an ending (and you’d be surprised at how many works with awesome first lines also have awesome last lines – or perhaps you wouldn’t be surprised), we feel compelled to treat you to a list of our favorite last lines as well. Click through for 20 of our favorite endings from our bookshelf of classic and contemporary greats, and let us know your own picks for best last lines in the comments. 1. Best pessimistic diagnosis of a resigned and wistful generation: “Yes,” I said. 2. Most delicate ending to a delicate, harrowing story about the different kinds of humanity and grace: “Shut up, Bobby Lee,” The Misfit said. 3. Best reason to go adventuring in Wonderland: 4. Don’t ever tell anybody anything. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10. 11.

Les blasons Ayant avecque lui toujours fait bon ménage, J'eusse aimé célébrer, sans être inconvenant, Tendre corps féminin, ton plus bel apanage, Que tous ceux qui l'ont vu disent hallucinant. Ç'eût été mon ultime chant, mon chant du cygne Mon dernier billet doux, mon message d'adieu. Or, malheureusement, les mots qui le désignent Le disputent à l'exécrable, à l'odieux. C'est la grande pitié de la langue française, C'est son talon d'Achille et c'est son déshonneur, De n'offrir que des mots entachés de bassesse À cet incomparable instrument de bonheur. Alors que tant de fleurs ont des noms poétiques, Tendre corps féminin, c'est fort malencontreux Que ta fleur la plus douce et la plus érotique Et la plus enivrante en ait un si scabreux. Mais le pire de tous est un petit vocable De trois lettres, pas plus, familier, coutumier, Il est inexplicable, il est irrévocable, Honte à celui-là qui l'employa le premier. La malepeste soit de cette homonymie! Et que je les connais.

25 Ways To Fuck With Your Characters - StumbleUpon As storyteller, you are god. And to be frank, you’re not a particularly nice god — at least, not if you want your story to resonate with readers. A good storyteller is a crass and callous deity who treats the characters under his watchful eye like a series of troubled butt-puppets. From this essential conflict — storyteller versus character — a story is born. (After all, that’s what a plot truly is: a character who strives to get above all the shit the storyteller dumps on his fool head.) Put differently, as a storyteller it’s your job to be a dick. It’s your job to fuck endlessly with the characters twisting beneath your thumb. And here’s 25 ways for you to do just that. 1. Gods have avatars, mortal or semi-mortal beings that exist on earth to embody the deity’s agenda. 2. The audience and the character must know the stakes on the table — “If you don’t win this poker game, your grandmother will lose her beloved pet orangutan, Orange Julius.” 3. 4. 5. 6. This one? 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach. Most of us really try to teach the kids to think, rather than becoming nice little automatons.

Related: