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Florida Center for Reading Research

Florida Center for Reading Research
The Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) is a multidisciplinary research center at Florida State University. FCRR explores all aspects of reading research—basic research into literacy-related skills for typically developing readers and those who struggle, studies of effective prevention and intervention, and psychometric work on formative assessment. To conduct basic research on reading, reading growth, reading assessment, and reading instruction that will contribute to the scientific knowledge of reading and benefit students in Florida and throughout the nation. To disseminate information about research-based practices related to literacy instruction and assessment for children in pre-K through 12th grade. To conduct applied research that will have an immediate impact on policy and practices related to literacy instruction in Florida.

http://www.fcrr.org/

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Digital Literacy & Citizenship Classroom Curriculum NEW! Learn the fundamentals of digital citizenship through choose-your-own-adventure interactive experiences DIGITAL COMPASS - Where are you headed? The only educational game that gives kids the freedom to explore how decisions made in their digital lives can impact their relationships and future. Bring a blended-learning approach to teaching digital citizenship DIGITAL BYTES teaches teens digital citizenship through student-directed, media-rich activities that tackle real-world dilemmas. Teens learn from peers' experiences then create collaborative projects that voice their ideas for making smart choices online. Measure Student Learning with Interactive Assessments We offer THREE WAYS to assess student learning about digital literacy and citizenship.

Student Center Activities During 2004-2007, a team of teachers at FCRR collected ideas and created Student Center Activities for use in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms. Accompanying these Student Center Activities is a Teacher Resource Guide and Professional Development DVD that offers important insights on differentiated instruction and how to use the student center materials. Frequently Asked Questions about Student Center Activities Grades K-1 Student Center Activities (2005) Grades K-1 Student Center Activities (Revised, 2008) Grades 2-3 Student Center Activities (2006) Grades 4-5 Student Center Activities (2007) Student Center Activities and Instructional Routines Search Tool The K-5 Student Center Activities (SCA) and K-3 Instructional Routines search tool provides teacher's access to the 522 individual SCA and the instructional routines from Empowering Teachers.

Connecting Word Meanings Through Semantic Mapping Semantic maps (or graphic organizers) are maps or webs of words. The purpose of creating a map is to visually display the meaning-based connections between a word or phrase and a set of related words or concepts. Semantic maps help students, especially struggling students and those with disabilities, to identify, understand, and recall the meaning of words they read in the text. Learning to create these maps aligns with three of the ELA Common Core State Standards: Teaching students to use semantic maps

A nod to Dylan Thomas - The Science Show Robyn Williams: Let's end with a nod to Dylan Thomas, whose centenary was last year. Here's his alter ego in Australia. Guess who? Reading: One Christmas was so like another in those years around the sea town corner now, that I can never remember whether it was 106 degrees in 1953 or whether it was 103 degrees in 1956. BoomWriter - Schools BoomWriter lets you easily incorporate and experience the benefits of technology as your students are engaged in the following (or similar) standards-based learning activities: Grade 3 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative Program- Departmental Listings - The Ohio State University Administration Executive Director Faculty Board Art Department Senior Graphic Designer Business Office IDEC Director Director, Technology and Operations Help Desk IDEC Webmaster Office Associate Systems Manager Keep Books Literacy Collaborative Research Help Desk Literacy Collaborative Training Office Associate Primary Trainer Program Managers Training Coordinator MIS Systems Manager Reading Recovery

LSI The Life Space Interview (LSI)&Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) The Life Space Interview (LSI) was developed by Fritz Redl, a pioneer in psychoeducational interventions. A recent variation on the LSI is the "Life Space Crisis Intervention", developed by Nicholas Long, a student of Bill Morse, who was a student of Fritz Redl. Everything described in this section has since been incorporated into the more updated/modern " LSCI". Below, you will find a link to a web site that describes the LSCI and how to implement it.

Storybird Studio – literacy and writing tools for teachers, librarians, educators and classrooms Professional artwork jumpstarts student creativity, quickly drawing them into the writing process and scaffolding their progress. Simple tools keeps them on track; social feedback keeps them going. Onboard students with or without email, issue challenges, review and share work, and build a beautiful class library. Hattie effect size list - 195 Influences Related To Achievement  John Hattie developed a way of ranking various influences in different meta-analyses related to learning and achievement according to their effect sizes. In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked 138 influences that are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Therefore he decided to judge the success of influences relative to this ‘hinge point’, in order to find an answer to the question “What works best in education?” Hattie studied six areas that contribute to learning: the student, the home, the school, the curricula, the teacher, and teaching and learning approaches. But Hattie did not only provide a list of the relative effects of different influences on student achievement.

4 Free Web Tools for Student Portfolios I still have every single project I ever completed in preschool. My dad collected them and kept each one in a grocery bag that he tucked away in the back of his closet. Looking through his collection now, there's nothing incredibly prodigious about the work that I created as a four-year-old boy. Professor Gail Gillon - People - College of Education - University of Canterbury - New Zealand Position Pro Vice-Chancellor Qualifications PhD University of Queensland, Australia FRST Post Doctoral Fellowship, University of Canterbury BEd, University of Canterbury Dip Teaching and Speech Therapy (Dist) Christchurch Teachers' College Teacher's Dip LTCL Speech & Drama Trinity College of Music, London Office

Teachers toolbox - Professor John Hattie's Table of Effect Sizes Hattie says ‘effect sizes' are the best way of answering the question ‘what has the greatest influence on student learning?'. An effect-size of 1.0 is typically associated with: • advancing learners' achievement by one year, or improving the rate of learning by 50% • a correlation between some variable (e.g., amount of homework) and achievement of approximately .50 • A two grade leap in GCSE, e.g. from a C to an A grade An effect size of 1.0 is clearly enormous!

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