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Maker Space In Education Series… 10 Sites To Start Making In The Classroom

Maker Space In Education Series… 10 Sites To Start Making In The Classroom
Welcome back and I sure hope you enjoyed the last article of 20 Reasons for Maker Space in Education. I hope you enjoy this post as I highlight 10 sites to possible help you to get Making in the classroom… even if in the smallest way! I encourage you to send me information and resources you think help with this idea, as I am also Making time to learn. First, to ensure you do not miss one of these valuable posts or other resources covering PBL, Digital Curriculum, Web 2.0, STEM, 21st century learning, and technology integration please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS. As always, I invite you to follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Please give this post a retweet and pass it on. Booking Info – Time to think about your new school year needs. Makers Space Series Part 1: Maker Space In Education Series… 20 Reasons Your Students Should Be Making Part 2: Maker Space In Education Series… 10 Sites To Start Making In The Classroom Makezine – This might be a great place to start. Like this:

https://21centuryedtech.wordpress.com/2014/08/03/maker-space-in-education-series-10-sites-to-start-making-in-the-classroom/

Related:  Maker Space IdeasMakerspace Ideas/SitesWeb Pages and other Resources on Makerspaces

Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started As the Maker Movement starts to gain momentum, schools that are trying to find ways to foster the do-it-yourself environment can learn a few lessons from another nexus in the universe: public libraries. Dale Dougherty, founding editor and publisher of Make Magazine — and the de facto leader of the Maker Movement — has a vision to create a network of libraries, museums, and schools with what he calls “makerspaces” that draw on common resources and experts in each community. Libraries and museums, he said, are easier places to incorporate makerspaces than schools, because they have more space flexibility and they’re trying to attract teens with their programs. “Schools have already got the kids,” Dougherty noted wryly, at the recent American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Seattle. One day during the conference, dubbed Maker Monday, focused on the Maker Movement, which emphasizes learning by engaging in tech-related projects.

The Maker Educator Workshop I am doing full day workshops on The Maker Educator both at ISTE 2016 and EduTECH in Australia. What follows is both the description-goals and an overview of the workshop’s learning activities. Workshop Description, Goals, and Outline Description Capture the Learning: Crafting the Maker Mindset You've heard some good stuff about the maker movement such as how making helps students learn through embodied cognition, creates a mindset that's empowering, and builds creative confidence. You're interested in crafting some maker lessons but don't know where to start or how to do something that works in your classroom. Or perhaps you're worried that you don't have time to do a long, involved project. How do you still teach the Common Core or cover the required curriculum? These simple steps will get you started. Teaching Creativity?

Launching a Makerspace: Lessons Learned From a Transformed School Library Excitement about school makerspaces has been in the air, but many educators eager to create hands-on learning spaces in their schools still aren’t sure how to get started or why it’s worth the effort. New Canaan High School librarian Michelle Luhtala recently jumped headfirst into creating a makerspace in her library and documented what she learned, how her space changed and how it affected students along the way. Her experience was very different from elementary school librarian Andy Plemmons, whose makerspace started with a 3-D printer obtained through a grant and blossomed into a core teaching resource at his school. Luhtala is blessed with a big library, but for most of her career it has been dominated by large bookshelves. Over time, Luhtala has pared down her collection as she increased the digital reading material the library offers, but in order to make room for a makerspace she cleared out 7,000 books.

Makerspaces- Symbaloo Gallery About this webmix : No description Makerspace.com MAKE | Makerspaces Manufacturing Makerspaces Thinkery Austin What is a Makerspace? Libraries Embracing Makerspa.. Makerspaces Meetup Groups Librarian's Guide-Makerspaces IMLS Talking Points Makerspace LiveBinder Space Adventure | Maker Faire Maker Spaces in the Library Illuminating Learning Library Makerspaces The Maker Education Initiati.. Austin Tinkering School Makerspace at School Library MakerSpaces UNIS Colaboratory Austin Mini Maker Faire Alt Ed Austin - Blog Maker Space - Stowe Elementa.. A Librarian's Guide to Makerspaces: 16 Resources "There were more than 135 million adult makers, more than half of the total adult population in America, in 2015." What is a makerspace? You’ve no doubt been hearing that word more than a few times over the past several years. Makerspaces, also called hackerspaces, hackspaces, and fablabs, are collaborative spaces where people gather to get creative with DIY projects, invent new ones, and share ideas. Since the first official makerspace convened six years ago in a library in upstate New York, libraries have remained an ideal setting for makerspace events across the country. Many offer community resources like 3D printers, software, electronics, craft and hardware supplies, and more.

Coding with Ozobots Calibrate Your Ozobot What does this mean? Ozobot’s “eyes” (the sensors) are very sensitive to the surrounding light. So much so that, if the paper changes or if you go closer to the window, it affects how Ozobot sees what’s underneath. To let Ozobot know what its surroundings are, you need to calibrate: Turn on the ozobot, place the ozobot on the black dot, and wait for it to turn green. Creating an Authentic Maker Education Rubric While many teachers are excited about the maker movement and may even be creating projects for their classrooms, assessment can be puzzling even to veteran classroom teachers. How can teachers prove that deep, rich learning is occurring through making? How do we justify a grade to students and parents alike, especially to the student who "just isn’t good at art"? By crafting a three-part rubric that assesses process, understanding, and product, teachers can rest assured that they are covering all the bases. Part 1: Process

Maker & DIY Programs Maker enthusiasts: anyone can edit this page. Please share your resources here! You may also be interested in our STEM Resources page and our Teen Programming Guidelines from YALSA (.pdf) Robotic story about UTA Research As we walked down to the University of Texas at Arlington theater from Julienne Greer’s office, the assistant professor of theatre arts: social robotics and performance, had to cradle her robot, NAO, like a sleeping toddler. The robot’s arms slumped against her body, making it difficult for her to pull her keys out of her pocket. She dropped them, joking about its toddler qualities. Once inside, we situated NAO onstage for photos, as curious students asked questions, fascinated about why a robot belongs in the theater.

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