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Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition

Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition
As a teacher, you put a lot of thought into how to make your class and the material as accessible and engaging as possible. You think about what you know, and how you first learned it. You think about what your students already know, and how to use that knowledge as the foundation for what you're about to teach. And, as if that's not enough, you think about how to make your content so engaging that no matter what else is happening (lunch next period, upcoming prom, or the latest social media scandal among the sophomores), your lesson will hold your students' attention. All that thought goes into a lesson, and still there are students spacing out during class or seeming to fall behind. Working so hard and still not reaching every student can be frustrating. Thinking About Learning In 2005, the National Academy of Sciences reviewed everything we know about learning in a paper called How Students Learn. That's exactly what Eric Mazur decided to do. Shifting the Responsibility

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/hands-off-teaching-cultivates-metacognition-hunter-maats-katie-obrien

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Apple TV Settings for the Classroom While Apple TV’s default screen saver photographs are beautiful, you can use your own images for the screen saver. It’s like using the display connected to your Apple TV as a digital bulletin board! I suggest adding an iCloud Photos album on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad titled Apple TV. After adding images to this album, go into Apple TV’s Settings app and choose Screen Saver. Choose iCloud Photos and your album that you titled Apple TV. How do you get tech-resistant teachers to embrace change? By Peter West July 14th, 2015 The secret may be in organization-wide changes and lots of support Many millions of dollars have been wasted over the years by the well-intentioned, but ad hoc, introduction of technology into education. Eager tech savvy teachers or administrators may jump in feet first, but a significant portion of their colleagues are left struggling along or resisting the change. The results of well-planned, long-term implementations, however, can produce momentum. When even reluctant adopters are given support, training, and time, positive changes can occur.

Resources for Assessment in Project-Based Learning Project-based learning (PBL) demands excellent assessment practices to ensure that all learners are supported in the learning process. With good assessment practices, PBL can create a culture of excellence for all students and ensure deeper learning for all. We’ve compiled some of the best resources from Edutopia and the web to support your use of assessment in PBL, including information about strategies, advice on how to address the demands of standardized tests, and summaries of the research. PBL Assessment Foundations

Want to improve your problem-solving skills? Try metacognition Today’s post is by Anne-Lise Prigent the editor in charge of education publications at OECD Publishing French poet Paul Valéry once expressed his love for mathematics: “I worship this most beautiful subject of all and I don’t care that my love remains unrequited.” Unrequited love, or, all too often, a big stumbling block that inspires fear and defiance, mathematics are usually not seen as an excuse to have fun.

Is Your District Missing the Digital Literacy Boat? - Reinventing K-12 Learning In many ways, today represents an unprecedented opportunity to advance student literacy. With tablets, e-readers, and mobile phones, you can literally carry endless shelves of excellent books in your pocket. In addition, education technology offers breakthrough tools to help teachers raise the literacy bar. The Best Posts On Metacognition Helping students strengthen their understanding of metacognition — thinking about their thinking — is an important goal of my teaching. And I’ve written a lot about it. I thought it would be helpful to gather all of those posts in one “The Best…” list. Here are My Best Posts On Metacognition:

For Cash-Strapped Schools, Smart Ways to Spend Limited Tech Dollars For schools looking to spend limited dollars allocated for technology in smart and efficient ways, lessons learned over years of making tough decisions can be helpful. Mark Samberg, who has worked in education for 13 years, first as a K-12 tech director and later as a district level technology director, has some sage advice. Samberg is a research associate for the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation, a center at North Carolina State University dedicated to helping figure out what tech solutions work in classrooms and to sharing what its researchers learn with educators. Engaging Brains: How to Enhance Learning by Teaching Kids About Neuroplasticity Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. Enhancing Student Commitment

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: Flipping for New Chromebook for Today’s Classrooms After using the ASUS Chromebook Flip C100 I’m left with just two questions: 1) Why doesn’t every school provide one for every student? The Chromebook Flip would save schools money and provide a more effective learning tool then 20th century alternatives. Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. Students who succeed academically often rely on being able to think effectively and independently in order to take charge of their learning. These students have mastered fundamental but crucial skills such as keeping their workspace organized, completing tasks on schedule, making a plan for learning, monitoring their learning path, and recognizing when it might be useful to change course.

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