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Ancient Japan - The Ancient Japanese Empire

Ancient Japan - The Ancient Japanese Empire
The Geisha, the traditional Japanese ideal of beauty Where did the Japanese come from? Why did they settle the islands? What did life look like before history was written down? In order to get a handle on ancient Japanese history, it helps to consider that it is driven by outside influences. Jomon Culture in Japan The Jomon people were some of the earliest people to establish villages in Japan Although the Japanese do not settle Japan until the third century B.C., humans had lived in Japan from about 30,000 B.C.. Then around 10,000 B.C., these original inhabitants developed a unique culture which lasted for several thousand years: the Jomon culture. We divide the Jomon into six separate eras—ten thousand years, after all, is a long time and even preliterate cultures change dramatically over time. The Kofun Cuirass, a well preserved example of early Japanese armor The Incipient Jomon, which is dated from about 10,500 B.C. to 8,000 B.C. has left us only pottery fragments. The Ainu Related:  Ancient cultures

Ancient China - The Ancient Chinese Civilization Chinese Historical Accounts the Forbidden City, the home of the Chinese emperors until the last dynasty was overthrown in the 20th century Chinese history, until the twentieth century, was written mostly by members of the ruling scholar-official class and was meant to provide the ruler with precedents to guide or justify his policies. These accounts focused on dynastic politics and colorful court histories and included developments among the commoners only as backdrops. The historians described a Chinese political pattern of dynasties, one following another in a cycle of ascent, achievement, decay, and rebirth under a new family. Of the consistent traits identified by independent historians, a salient one has been the capacity of the Chinese to absorb the people of surrounding areas into their own civilization. Sun-Tzu, the realist writer of the the influential "Art of War" The first prehistoric dynasty is said to be Xia , from about the twenty-first to the sixteenth century B.C.

History of Latvia The History of Latvia began when the area that is today Latvia was settled following the end of the last glacial period, around 9000 BC. Ancient Baltic peoples appeared during the second millennium BC, and four distinct tribal realms in Latvia's territories were identifiable towards the end of the first millennium AD. Latvia's principal river, the Daugava River, was at the head of an important mainland route from the Baltic region through Russia into southern Europe and the Middle East, used by the Vikings and later Nordic and German traders. In the early medieval period, the region's peoples resisted Christianisation and became subject to attack in the Northern Crusades. Today's capital, Riga, founded in 1201 by Teutonic colonists at the mouth of the Daugava, became a strategic base in a papally-sanctioned conquest of the area by the Livonian Brothers of the Sword. From the mid-1940s, the country was subject to Soviet economic control and saw considerable Russification of its peoples.

Women in Ancient Japan: From Matriarchal Antiquity to Acquiescent Confinement The role of women in ancient Japan elicits inconsistencies due to different influences that were integrated at various time periods. The primary influence that contributed to these inconsistencies was religion. Integration of the two major religions of Japan, Shintoism and Buddhism, created a paradox for the female identity; altering women’s place in Japan’s matriarchal antiquity to a state of acquiescent confinement by the dawn of the Meiji Restoration. Different conjectures of ancient Japanese women were formed in direct correlation to the spiritual beliefs of the time. Evaluating the feminine identities educed by these beliefs illustrates the drastic changes that occurred for women. Painting depicting women of ancient Japan. The Kojiki and Nihongi are the two original Japanese written records that illuminate the first documented Japanese attitude towards women. In 552 A.D the introduction of Buddhism from China would interfere with the Shinto dominated perception of women. i.) iii.)

THE PHOENICIANS Mediterranean trade: from the 11th century BC The Phoenicians inhabit the region of modern Lebanon and Syria from about 3000 BC (see Palestine and Phoenicia). They become the greatest traders and the best sailors and navigators of the pre-classical world. They are also the first people to establish a large colonial network based on seafaring. In all these skills they build on the example of their maritime predecessors, the Minoans of Crete. An Egyptian narrative of about 1080 BC, the Story of Wen-Amen, provides an insight into the scale of this activity. The most prosperous period for Phoenicia is the 10th century BC, when the surrounding region is stable. For Solomon's great Temple in Jerusalem Hiram provides skilled craftsmen and materials - particularly timber, including cedar from the forests of Lebanon. Phoenicia is famous for its luxury goods. These are only the products which the Phoenicians export. The phonetic alphabet: from the 2nd millennium BC Dido's city: 814 BC

Save Koalas from Deforestation Target: Greg Hunt, Australian Minister for the Environment Goal: Save koalas from deforestation The koala is considered a threatened species in three parts of Australia, but their habitat is being destroyed by removing irreplaceable foliage that they depend on. The destruction of native habitat creates major holes in the koalas’ landscape. A recent study from the University of Queensland revealed the importance of maintaining at least 30% of forest land to ensure the koala’s survival. Results point to the importance of the species’ access to wide landscapes, because habitat isolation can threaten genetic diversity which is necessary to conservation. Demand that action be taken before any more irreversible damage is done to these wonderful creatures’ habitat and future generations. Dear Minister Greg Hunt, I am writing this letter to express my somber concern for Australia’s current environmental offset system. Sincerely, [Your Name Here]

Early History and Culture One of the most recognizable remnants of Japan's so-called "Tomb period" is the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, who is said to have reigned during the 4th century. With all the technological innovations coming from modern Japan, it's easy to forget that even they had a Stone Age. From around the middle of the 11th century B.C.E. to 300 B.C.E., Japan was populated by a Neolithic civilization called the Jômon (rope pattern) culture. This group of hunters and gatherers decorated their pottery by twisting rope around the wet clay, to produce a distinctive pattern. Remnants of their pit-dwellings and enormous mounds of discarded shells mark the locations of their settlements, which were scattered throughout the islands. But it wasn't until the Yayoi period (300 B.C.E. to 250 C.E.) that Japan became a rice-loving culture. The entrance gate to a Shinto shrine is called a torii. The Tomb period (250 C.E.-552 C.E.) gets its name from the massive tombs that dot the landscape to this day. The Land of Wa

Wikijunior:Ancient Civilizations/Hebrews Map of Israel before it was divided Who are Hebrews?[edit] Hebrews were ancestors of Samaritans and Jews. They claim to be the descendants of the biblical Patriarch Abraham. What country did they live in? Hebrews were nomadic people. What did their buildings look like? In the warm climate of the Middle East the house was not so important. When Hebrews were nomadic people, they lived in tents. Another option was living in a cave. Wealthier people lived in the houses built of sun-dried mud bricks. But what made Hebrews really proud was the Jerusalem Temple. After Jews returned from Captivity in 536 BC, they started building the Second Temple. What did they eat? Second century Hebrew manuscript of Ten Commandments Hebrew food was similar to the food of other Mediterranean people: they ate homemade bread that the lady of the house would bake in the big clay ovens in the yard, lentils, goat cheese, olives, and fresh fruits. What did they wear? Jewish noblemen in ancient Judah What did they believe?

Disbelieve it or Not, Ancient History Suggests That Atheism is as Natural to Humans as Religion People in the ancient world did not always believe in the gods, a new study suggests – casting doubt on the idea that religious belief is a “default setting” for humans. “Early societies were far more capable than many since of containing atheism within the spectrum of what they considered normal – Tim Whitmarsh” Despite being written out of large parts of history, atheists thrived in the polytheistic societies of the ancient world – raising considerable doubts about whether humans really are “wired” for religion – a new study suggests. The claim is the central proposition of a new book by Tim Whitmarsh, Professor of Greek Culture and a Fellow of St John’s College, University of Cambridge. As a result, the study challenges two assumptions that prop up current debates between atheists and believers: Firstly, the idea that atheism is a modern point of view, and second, the idea of “religious universalism” – that humans are naturally predisposed, or “wired”, to believe in gods.

Japan's Mysterious Pyramids

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