background preloader

Women in Ancient Japan: From Matriarchal Antiquity to Acquiescent Confinement

Women in Ancient Japan: From Matriarchal Antiquity to Acquiescent Confinement
The role of women in ancient Japan elicits inconsistencies due to different influences that were integrated at various time periods. The primary influence that contributed to these inconsistencies was religion. Integration of the two major religions of Japan, Shintoism and Buddhism, created a paradox for the female identity; altering women’s place in Japan’s matriarchal antiquity to a state of acquiescent confinement by the dawn of the Meiji Restoration. Painting depicting women of ancient Japan. The Kojiki and Nihongi are the two original Japanese written records that illuminate the first documented Japanese attitude towards women. Chinese records dating back to the first century reveal that women were not only allowed to rule, but also encouraged to rule due to a confidence in women to bring peace and regulation to the country. This instance of historical record illustrates themes that parallel in the Shinto mythology during a time when Shinto was the primary religion. Lu, David J. Related:  People JapanDiversAncient cultures

Japan Will Be Harvesting Its Solar Energy from Floating Mega-Structures by Natalie Shoemaker The Paris climate talks set forth a global commitment toward supporting renewable energy. It would allow nations to become more self-sufficient, while slowing the coming climate change. Take Japan: It's a small, mountainous island nation — building on flat land comes at a premium. The project will be Kyocera's fourth floating installation. Here's a video of the floating solar power plant Kyocera completed in the Hyogo Prefecture of Japan: Together, the solar panels will generate 13.7 megawatts, which is enough electricity to power approximately 4,970 households. "Japan needs new, independent, renewable energy sources after the Fukushima disaster," says Eva Pauly, international business manager at Ciel et Terre. The future of renewable energy could help us create a greener future, and also, through these renewable resources, allow every country to become its own Saudi Arabia. Photo Credit: CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT / Getty Staff

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East Maps can be a powerful tool for understanding the world, particularly the Middle East, a place in many ways shaped by changing political borders and demographics. Here are 40 maps crucial for understanding the Middle East — its history, its present, and some of the most important stories in the region today. Middle East History The fertile crescent, the cradle of civilization The fertile crescent, the cradle of civilizationIf this area wasn't the birthplace of human civilization, it was at least a birthplace of human civilization. Called "the fertile crescent" because of its lush soil, the "crescent" of land mostly includes modern-day Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Israel-Palestine. The Middle East today The dialects of Arabic today The dialects of Arabic todayThis map shows the vast extent of the Arabic-speaking world and the linguistic diversity within it. Israel-Palestine Syria Iran Afghanistan Saudi Arabia and Oil Iraq and Libya Points of Light

Ancient Japan - The Ancient Japanese Empire The Geisha, the traditional Japanese ideal of beauty Where did the Japanese come from? Why did they settle the islands? Jomon Culture in Japan The Jomon people were some of the earliest people to establish villages in Japan Although the Japanese do not settle Japan until the third century B.C., humans had lived in Japan from about 30,000 B.C.. Then around 10,000 B.C., these original inhabitants developed a unique culture which lasted for several thousand years: the Jomon culture. We divide the Jomon into six separate eras—ten thousand years, after all, is a long time and even preliterate cultures change dramatically over time. The Kofun Cuirass, a well preserved example of early Japanese armor The Incipient Jomon, which is dated from about 10,500 B.C. to 8,000 B.C. has left us only pottery fragments. The Initial Jomon, which lasted from 8,000 B.C. to 5,000 B.C. is distinguished by the fact that we have pretty complete pots (isn't archaeology exciting?) The Samurai of Japan The Ainu

These GIFs Show How Hiroshima Has Emerged From Devastation Over 71 Years Discipline and Punish, Panopticism The following, according to an order published at the end of the seventeenth century, were the measures to be taken when the plague appeared in a town. First, a strict spatial partitioning: the closing of the town and its outlying districts, a prohibition to leave the town on pain of death, the killing of all stray animals; the division of the town into distinct quarters, each governed by an intendant. Each street is placed under the authority of a syndic, who keeps it under surveillance; if he leaves the street, he will be condemned to death. On the appointed day, everyone is ordered to stay indoors: it is forbidden to leave on pain of death. Inspection functions ceaselessly. Five or six days after the beginning of the quarantine, the process of purifying the houses one by one is begun. They are different projects, then, but not incompatible ones. Bentham's Panopticon is the architectural figure of this composition. A real subjection is born mechanically from a fictitious relation.

Early History and Culture One of the most recognizable remnants of Japan's so-called "Tomb period" is the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, who is said to have reigned during the 4th century. With all the technological innovations coming from modern Japan, it's easy to forget that even they had a Stone Age. From around the middle of the 11th century B.C.E. to 300 B.C.E., Japan was populated by a Neolithic civilization called the Jômon (rope pattern) culture. This group of hunters and gatherers decorated their pottery by twisting rope around the wet clay, to produce a distinctive pattern. But it wasn't until the Yayoi period (300 B.C.E. to 250 C.E.) that Japan became a rice-loving culture. The entrance gate to a Shinto shrine is called a torii. The Tomb period (250 C.E.-552 C.E.) gets its name from the massive tombs that dot the landscape to this day. The Land of Wa The first written records about and by the Japanese date from this time. Ten Thousand Leaves Vying for Power High Art

ukiyo-e woodblock prints in animated gifs click 2x wait for it aug 18, 2015 japanese artist brings ukiyo-e woodblock prints to life through animated gifs japanese artist brings ukiyo-e woodblock prints to life through animated gifs(above) katsushika hokusai’s ‘yoshida at tokaido’ animated all gifs courtesy of segawa thirty-seven from the 17th through 19th centuries, ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings populated the japanese art and cultural movement. artist katsushika hokusai popularized the trend with his series of ’36 views of mount fuji’, depicting scenes of the renowned mountain captured in different seasons and weather conditions, from a variety of different places and perspectives. these compositions were created through a cooperative effort of craftsman, who each adopted traditional techniques to sketch, carve and colorize the works. a spaceship shocks figures in ‘azai hall – 500 rakan temples’ an animated version of ‘tea house at koishikawa. the morning after a snowfall’ wind sweeps away papers in the image ‘ejiri in the suruga province’

L'opinion publique n'existe pas Je voudrais préciser d’abord que mon propos n’est pas de dénoncer de façon mécanique et facile les sondages d’opinion, mais de procéder à une analyse rigoureuse de leur fonctionnement et de leurs fonctions. Ce qui suppose que l’on mette en question les trois postulats qu’ils engagent implicitement. Toute enquête d’opinion suppose que tout le monde peut avoir une opinion ; ou, autrement dit, que la production d’une opinion est à la portée de tous. Quitte à heurter un sentiment naïvement démocratique, je contesterai ce premier postulat. Deuxième postulat : on suppose que toutes les opinions se valent. Troisième postulat implicite : dans le simple fait de poser la même question à tout le monde se trouve impliquée l’hypothèse qu’il y a un consensus sur les problèmes, autrement dit qu’il y a un accord sur les questions qui méritent d’être posées. On fait très souvent aux sondages d’opinion des reproches techniques. Des problématiques imposées Des instruments d’action politique Étude d’un cas

Japan's Mysterious Pyramids 9 Principles of Japanese Art and Culture There are 9 basic principles that underlie Japanese art and culture. They're called aesthetics — concepts that answer the question: what is art? There are 9 Japanese aesthetics. They are the basis for Japanese art, fashion, pop culture, music and movies. 1. Can you imagine if all the characters in movies were perfect? 2. Miyabi is often translated "heartbreaker". 3. Shibui means simple, subtle or unobtrusive. 4. Iki is uniqueness. Iki is the movie character who's a bad-ass with style and grace. 5. Jo-ha-kyu is a tempo that can be translated as — start slowly, accelerate and end suddenly. Modern uses include movies, music and advertising. 6. Yugen states that life is boring when all the facts are known. Where does the smoke come from? 7.Geido (discipline and ethics) Have you ever noticed that Japanese martial arts (and traditional arts) are all about discipline? 8. Ensou is a zen concept. 9. Kawaii is cute.

À la découverte des mosos, cette tribu où les femmes décident de tout Aux confins du sud-ouest de la Chine, non loin de la frontière Tibétaine, réside un peuple qui intrigue le reste du monde pour ses coutumes, mais surtout pour sa vision de l'amour et de la relation intime. Les Mosos sont le dernier peuple matriarcal et ont gagné le titre de communauté-modèle à l'occasion du cinquantième anniversaire de l'ONU. Les femmes, au centre de la communauté Les Mosos vivent autour du lac Lugu, sur les rives des régions du Yunnan et Sichuan. Ce lac serait né des larmes de la déesse Gemu, que tous vénèrent. L'harmonie comme principe de vie Chez ce peuple matriarcal, le mariage n'existe pas. Aucune promesse, aucune trahison Les principes économiques d'une famille reposent sur tous les membres qui la composent. Cela ne signifie pas qu'un homme et une femme, tous deux amoureux, aillent coucher dans le lit d'autres partenaires. L'amour sans tabou Dès l'âge de 13 ans, les enfants atteignent leur majorité. Transmettre les traditions L'art de s'aimer

Japanese Feudalism and European Feudalism Although Japan and Europe did not have any direct contact with one another during the medieval and early modern periods, they independently developed very similar socio-political systems. Often, these systems are labeled as feudal. What is feudalism? The great French historian Marc Bloch defined it this way: "A subject peasantry; widespread use of the service tenement (i.e. the fief) instead of a salary...; supremacy of a class of specialized warriors; ties of obedience and protection which bind man to man...; [and] fragmentation of authority - leading inevitably to disorder." In other words, there are peasants who are tied to the farm land and work for protection plus a portion of the harvest, rather than for money. Similarities between Japanese and European Feudalism Feudal Japanese and European societies were built on a system of hereditary classes. In both feudal Japan and Europe, constant warfare made warriors the most important class.

This Summer's Magical Photos of Japan's Annual Flurry of Fireflies in Forests Summer has arrived, which means longer days and warmer evenings to be spent exploring the great outdoors. In Japan, this season is marked by a magical, natural phenomenon as fireflies spread through the forests around the country, lighting up the night sky. Resembling tiny paper lanterns, these little winged beetles communicate with one another through their steady glows, creating a breathtaking view in the process, if you are lucky enough to stumble upon them. These little creatures typically breed for short periods of time and are difficult to detect when light pollution drowns out their brilliance, so photographers around the country have to be quick and savvy in order to capture their displays of bioluminescence. Further, the little bugs are extremely sensitive, reacting to lights and pollution and typically only live about 10 days, making images that portray their mystical glow that much more special. Above image via 365March (Yu Hashimoto) Image via fumial Image via Yasushi Kikuchi

10 Lessons From Real-Life Revolutions That Fictional Dystopias Ignore Recommended by Esther Inglis-Arkell Here's The Gruesome Way A Doctor First Proved The Heart Pumps Blood 10 Lessons From Real-Life Revolutions That Fictional Dystopias Ignore The Potato That Killed! This Rube Goldberg Machine Runs On Light Here's the Hallucination You (and Everyone Else) Have Experienced One Bad Piece of Press Made Black Widow Spiders Legendary The Mothman Who Created An Evolutionary Controversy An Architect's Guide to Famous Villain's Lairs The Einstellung Effect Proves That a Good Idea Can Be A Very Bad Idea The Secret Twist In the Bobo Doll Experiments That Turned Kids Mean A Black Hole Doesn't Die -- It Does Something A Lot Weirder The Doctor Who Sterilized U.S. Here's Why You See Those Flickering Clouds Around the Tavurvur Volcano This May Be The Longest Con In Pseudoscience This Test Proves That Language Forces Your Brain To Create Simulations This Chemist's Story Should Become a Movie Artist Draws Whimsical Illustrations Over The Shapes He Sees In Clouds

Related: