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How to Listen to Music: A Vintage Guide to the 7 Essential Skills

How to Listen to Music: A Vintage Guide to the 7 Essential Skills
by Maria Popova “Respond esthetically to all sounds, from the hum of the refrigerator motor or the paddling of oars on a lake, to the tones of a cello or muted trumpet.” Music has a powerful grip on our emotional brain. It can breathe new life into seemingly lifeless minds. But if there is indeed no music instinct, music — not just its creation, but also its consumption — must be an acquired skill. How, then, do we “learn” music beyond merely understanding how it works? From the wonderful vintage book Music: Ways of Listening, originally published in 1982, comes this outline of the seven essential skills of perceptive listening, which author and composer Elliott Schwartz argues have been “dulled by our built-in twentieth-century habit of tuning out” and thus need to be actively developed. Develop your sensitivity to music. Donating = Loving Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes hundreds of hours each month. You can also become a one-time patron with a single donation in any amount:

http://www.brainpickings.org/2012/04/12/elliott-schwartz-music-ways-of-listening/

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HARD BOP, a jazz music subgenre Sean Trane I believe this is Yusef’s last album for the Impulse label, and he’s in a quartet formation with Lawson on piano, Wright on bass and Brooks on drums. The album features a bunch of covers of standards, which IMHO don’t exactly fit with the Impulse “New Thing” image – so allow me to take the “!” away from this review. Opening with Road Runner (written by Yusef about life on the road), Lawson’s piano and Lateef’s sax bounce over each other to make it vibrant. The following Straighten up is a reprise of Nat Cole, and it will be joined a little later by Lester Young’s slow ballad Ghost Of A Chance and a bit later Exactly Like You (with a rare oboe).

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THE MOZART EFFECT … AND BEYOND BABBITT EFFECT: Child gibbers nonsense all the time. Eventually, people stop listening to him. Child doesn't care because all his playmates think he's cool. BARTÓK EFFECT: Child becomes more and more dissonant. Has trouble maintaining harmony with his peers. The Banality of Hannah Arendt Ride of her life: Hannah Arendt (Barbara Sukowa) rides the Egged bus to Jerusalem to cover the Eichmann trial "So," the motherly brunette asks conspiratorially, a billiard cue slung below her arm, "Was he the greatest love of your life?" No, it's not a scene from the latest chick flick; it's from Hannah Arendt, Margarethe von Trotta's new biopic about the German-Jewish political theorist. The questioner is the American critic and novelist Mary McCarthy, and she is referring to none other than Martin Heidegger, the controversial Nazi-aligned philosopher.

7 Habits of Highly Ineffective People With a twist to the common list of habits that are useful to establish, here are 7 habits that you do best to avoid. Just like finding habits that can be useful for you it’s important to find habits that are holding you back. Most of these 7 habits can easily become such a normal, everyday part of life that you hardly notice it (or how it’s affecting you). I’ve dabbled with all of them quite a bit. Not surprisingly I didn’t get much of the important stuff done. This Is Your Brain On Music Neurological Effects of Music on the Brain Author: Quotes taken from Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain; by Oliver Sacks Music can help recover damaged brain function by activating parts of the brain that are nearby. Music demands focus… it is the innate organization of music which is the great bastion against chaos. There is not one musical part of the brain. In fact, there’s sort of a dozen different parts of the brain which respond to pitch, rhythm, timbre, melodic contour…

Neuroscience of free will Neuroscience of free will is the part of neurophilosophy that studies the interconnections between free will and neuroscience. As it has become possible to study the living brain, researchers have begun to watch decision making processes at work. Findings could carry implications for our sense of agency and for moral responsibility and the role of consciousness in general.[1][2][3] Relevant findings include the pioneering study by Benjamin Libet and its subsequent redesigns; these studies were able to detect activity related to a decision to move, and the activity appears to begin briefly before people become conscious of it.[4] Other studies try to predict activity before overt action occurs.[5] Taken together, these various findings show that at least some actions - like moving a finger - are initiated unconsciously at first, and enter consciousness afterward.[6] A monk meditates. Overview[edit]

Developing a vivid aural imagination The extent to which your aural imagination is developed, largely determines: the quality of lines you play, how you play those lines (articulation, swing feel, inflection), and the sound you play with. Nothing has such an impact on your playing than your aural imagination. If there were a secret to improvising, developing your aural imagination would be it. Ok, ok. I didn’t say oral imagination. Top five regrets of the dying There was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'. Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives.

Cognitive neuroscience of music The cognitive neuroscience of music is the scientific study of brain-based mechanisms involved in the cognitive processes underlying music. These behaviours include music listening, performing, composing, reading, writing, and ancillary activities. It also is increasingly concerned with the brain basis for musical aesthetics and musical emotion. Grieving "It was at that time that that I relearnt a valuable lesson about the kindness of strangers." Photo: Getty My twin brother died, unexpectedly, five months ago. Jazz Ear Training - Master Your Intervals in 28 Days Being able to quickly hear, sing, and accurately identify intervals is essential to developing your improvisational ear. In this article, I’ve put together a plan for you to master your intervals in 28 days. For beginners, this will give you a much needed foundation. And for more advanced players, it will give you a chance to brush up on your intervals and fill in any gaps that might be there. The goal is to be so familiar with these sounds, that it requires very little effort to process them.

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