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What are you revealing online? Much more than you think

What are you revealing online? Much more than you think
What can be guessed about you from your online behavior? Two computer privacy experts — economist Alessandro Acquisti and computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck — on how little we know about how much others know. The best indicator of high intelligence on Facebook is apparently liking a page for curly fries. At least, that’s according to computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck (TED Talk: The curly fry conundrum), whose job is to figure out what we reveal about ourselves through what we say — and don’t say — online. Of course, the lines between online and “real” are increasingly blurred, but as Golbeck and privacy economist Alessandro Acquisti (TED Talk: Why privacy matters) both agree, that’s no reason to stop paying attention. TED got the two together to discuss what the web knows about you, and what we can do about the things we’d rather it forgot. I hear so much conflicting information about what I should and shouldn’t be posting online. Jennifer Golbeck: I agree with that. AA: Indeed.

http://ideas.ted.com/do-you-know-what-youre-revealing-online-much-more-than-you-think/

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"Manners Matter" Digital Citizenship Tips [Infographic] Enjoy this useful infographic produced by Knowthenet called Manners Matter. And they do, especially when it comes to teaching students proper digital citizenship skills. Resources such as this are a terrific way to share what’s important about technology with today’s digital learners!

7 lessons about finding the work you were meant to do Emily Pidgeon Whether it was during a career aptitude test or in a heart-to-heart chat after getting laid off, chances are someone has talked to you about how to “find your calling.” It’s one of those phrases people toss about. But StoryCorps founder Dave Isay takes issue with it … specifically, the verb. “Finding your calling — it’s not passive,” he says. The acronyms teens really use on social media The reason for the apology stems from a story I wrote last year, "28 Internet acronyms every parent should know." "Wouldn't it be interesting to do a piece on the acronyms that teens are using across the Internet, especially on social media and apps, to help parents understand what, in fact, their kids are talking about?" I thought.

This is your brain on communication Imagine that a device was invented which could record all of my memories, dreams and ideas, and then transmit the entire contents to your brain. Sounds like a game-changing invention, right? In fact, we already possess such a technology — it’s called effective storytelling. Human lives revolve around our ability to share information and experiences, and as a scientist, I’m fascinated by how our brains process interpersonal communication. Since 2008, my lab in Princeton has been focused on the question: How exactly do the neuron patterns in one person’s brain that are associated with their particular stories, memories and ideas get transmitted to another person’s brain?

#Being13: Teens and social media "When I get my phone taken away, I feel kind of naked," said Kyla, another 13-year-old. "I do feel kind of empty without my phone." More than 200 eighth graders from across the country allowed their social media feeds to be studied by child development experts who partnered with CNN. This is the first large scale study to analyze what kids actually say to each other on social media and why it matters so deeply to them. "I think they're addicted to the peer connection and affirmation they're able to get via social media," said child clinical psychologist Marion Underwood, the study's co-author. "To know what each other are doing, where they stand, to know how many people like what they posted, to know how many people followed them today and unfollowed them ... that I think is highly addictive."

Will automation take away all our jobs? iStock Here’s a startling fact: in the 45 years since the introduction of the automated teller machine, those vending machines that dispense cash, the number of human bank tellers employed in the United States has roughly doubled, from about a quarter of a million in 1970 to a half a million today, with 100,000 added since the year 2000. These facts, revealed in Boston University economist James Bessen’s recent book Learning by Doing, raise an intriguing question: What are all those tellers doing, and why hasn’t automation eliminated their employment by now?

Digital Natives, Yet Strangers to the Web When Reuben Loewy took up his first teaching gig in 2012, he had a major revelation: The digital revolution has dramatically transformed the way that kids perceive reality. Perhaps that makes the 55-year-old teacher sound like a dinosaur. What he discovered is, after all, one of the most obvious realities shaping education policy and parenting guides today. But, as Loewy will clarify, his revelation wasn’t simply that technology is overhauling America’s classrooms and redefining childhood and adolescence.

What are the ethics of using young blood to halt aging? In June, Stanford biologist Tony Wyss-Coray took the TED stage to describe no less than “an absolutely amazing development in aging research” (How young blood might help reverse aging. Yes, really). His research has shown that proteins found in the blood of younger mice can dramatically reverse the effects of aging when given to older mice. Master Your Online Presence with Alex Katzen (CLAS '12) - U.Va. Alumni, Parents & Friends Imagine if your future employers could see everything that you bring to the table. Okay, maybe not everything (thank you college), but all of the positive, constructive things you do on a daily basis; all of the news articles you read, the contacts you have, and any random interests. A resume is great and all, but for millennials, we need to showcase our talents in a whole new way. Creating a presence online brings you so many opportunities. If I’m looking for a freelance writer or a coder in the area to work with, I turn to Google. Optimizing your presence online is like showing up to a career fair, ready to greet each booth.

How a TED Talk inspired me to leave work to go live on a remote island Winston Chen left his job at a software company in Boston and moved his family to the island of Rødøy, population 108, for a year. Here, Chen’s son walks across a deserted beach on a stormy day. Photo: Winston Chen

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