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NATO

NATO
Coordinates: The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO; /ˈneɪtoʊ/ NAY-toh; French: Organisation du traité de l'Atlantique Nord (OTAN)), also called the (North) Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance based on the North Atlantic Treaty which was signed on 4 April 1949. The organization constitutes a system of collective defence whereby its member states agree to mutual defense in response to an attack by any external party. NATO's headquarters are in Brussels, Belgium, one of the 28 member states across North America and Europe, the newest of which, Albania and Croatia, joined in April 2009. An additional 22 countries participate in NATO's Partnership for Peace program, with 15 other countries involved in institutionalized dialogue programmes. The combined military spending of all NATO members constitutes over 70% of the global total.[4] Members' defense spending is supposed to amount to 2% of GDP.[5] History Beginnings Cold War French withdrawal Détente and escalation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO

Related:  Post-War BelgiumOne World Government

Benelux Benelux (sometimes also written as Bénélux in French) is a union[3] of states comprising three neighbouring countries in midwestern Europe: Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The union's name is a portmanteau formed from joining the first two or three letters of each country's name – Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg – and was first used to name the customs agreement that initiated the union (signed in 1944).[4] It is now used in a more general way to refer to the geographic, economic and cultural grouping of the three countries. In 1951, these countries joined West Germany, France, and Italy to form the European Coal and Steel Community, the predecessor of the European Economic Community (EEC) and today's European Union (EU).

1921 Council on Foreign Relations The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an American nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization, publisher, and think tank specializing in U.S. foreign policy and international affairs. The CFR is considered to be the nation's "most influential foreign-policy think tank".[1] Its membership has included senior politicians, more than a dozen Secretaries of State, CIA directors, bankers, lawyers, professors, and senior media figures. The CFR regularly convenes meetings at which government officials, global business leaders and prominent members of the intelligence/foreign-policy community discuss major international issues. The CFR was founded in 1921 and is headquartered in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C.. History[edit] Origins[edit]

International Security Assistance Force ISAF was initially charged with securing Kabul and surrounding areas from the Taliban, al Qaeda and factional warlords, so as to allow for the establishment of the Afghan Transitional Administration headed by Hamid Karzai.[3] In October 2003, the UN Security Council authorized the expansion of the ISAF mission throughout Afghanistan,[4] and ISAF subsequently expanded the mission in four main stages over the whole of the country.[5] From 2006 to 2011, ISAF had been involved in increasingly more intensive combat operations in southern and eastern Afghanistan. Troop contributors include from the United States, United Kingdom, NATO member states and a number of other countries. The intensity of the combat faced by contributing nations varies greatly, with the United States sustaining the largest numbers of casualties in intensive combat operations, but with other contributors, especially the United Kingdom, Canada, and Denmark, sustaining relatively higher rates of casualties. History[edit]

Combined Federated Battle Laboratories Network The Combined Federated Battle Laboratories Network (CFBLNet) is a laboratory environment which utilizes a distributed Wide Area Network (WAN) as the vehicle to experiment with new capabilities by conducting Research and Development, Trials and Assessment (RDT&A) on command, control, communication, computer, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) initiatives. Since 2010, CFBLNet has 13 full members: The United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand (the 'Five Eyes'), France, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain and Italy (all NATO members), the NATO organization and Sweden.[1] Network structure[edit] The CFBLNet consists of a distributed and integrated network architecture of Combined, Joint, and Military Service infrastructure components (networks, database servers, application servers, client workstations, etc.). The U.S. CFBLNet infrastructure is extensive and reaches to international demarcation points for the Southern Hemisphere and Europe.

European Coal and Steel Community The ECSC was first proposed by French foreign minister Robert Schuman on 9 May 1950 as a way to prevent further war between France and Germany. He declared his aim was to "make war not only unthinkable but materially impossible" which was to be achieved by regional integration, of which the ECSC was the first step. The Treaty would create a common market for coal and steel among its member states which served to neutralise competition between European nations over natural resources, particularly in the Ruhr. 1973 Trilateral Commission The Trilateral Commission is a non-governmental, non-partisan discussion group founded by David Rockefeller[1] in July 1973, to foster closer cooperation among North America, Western Europe, and Japan. History[edit] Founding[edit] Sensing a profound discord among the nations of North America, Europe and Japan, the Trilateral Commission was founded to foster substantive political and economic dialogue across the world.

Pulling the Teeth of the Tiger Extracting information on military operations in Afghanistan from the New Zealand Defence Force is difficult at the best of times. The Christmas Eve NZSAS raid on the business premises of the Afghan Tiger Group in Kabul last year was not one of NZDF’s best times... The so-called “combined forces” Christmas raid on the head quarters of the Kabul company that supplies vehicles to the U.S. military seems to have been a messy operation from start to finish. It went something like this. International Security Assistance Force headquarters received credible intelligence that a bomb attack on the U.S. Embassy was imminent.

NATO CRONOS Crisis Response Operations in NATO Operating Systems (CRONOS) is a system of interconnected computer networks used by NATO to transmit classified information. It provides NATO Secret level operations, with access to NATO intelligence applications and databases. As of 1999, a wide area network of NT computers used in NATO in Europe.[1] CRONOS provides e-mail, the Microsoft Office Suite, etc.[2] It provides informal messaging (e-mail) and information sharing within the NATO community.[3] There is no connectivity between CRONOS and any US network or with the coalition wide area network.[4] See also[edit] SIPRNet - U.S.

European Economic Community The European Economic Community (EEC) was an international organization created by the Treaty of Rome of 1957.[1] Its aim was to bring about economic integration, including a common market, among its six founding members: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany. The EEC was also known as the Common Market in the English-speaking world and sometimes referred to as the European Community even before it was officially renamed as such in 1993. It gained a common set of institutions along with the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) as one of the European Communities under the 1965 Merger Treaty (Treaty of Brussels).

Education Sabotauge During the Reagan administration, Department of Education Senior Policy Advisor was school board director Charlotte Iserbyt. Iserbyt has long been an appreciated voice of opposition to outcome-based education and Skinnerian methodology. She recently compiled a mammoth, informative expose on the devolution of American education called “The iberate Dumbing Down of America.”

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