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Psychosis

Psychosis
Psychosis (from the Greek ψυχή psyche, "mind/soul", and -ωσις -osis, "abnormal condition or derangement") refers to an abnormal condition of the mind, and is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a "loss of contact with reality". People suffering from psychosis are described as psychotic. Psychosis (as a sign of a psychiatric disorder) is a diagnosis of exclusion. Signs and symptoms[edit] People with psychosis may have one or more of the following: hallucinations, delusions, catatonia, or a thought disorder, as described below. Impairments in social cognition also occur.[3][4] Hallucinations[edit] A hallucination is defined as sensory perception in the absence of external stimuli. Delusions[edit] Psychosis may involve delusional beliefs, some of which are paranoid in nature. Catatonia[edit] Catatonia describes a profoundly agitated state in which the experience of reality is generally considered impaired. Thought disorders[edit] Psychiatric disorder[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis

Related:  Reading Listmental disordersPsicología

Schizophrenia Schizophrenia (/ˌskɪtsɵˈfrɛniə/ or /ˌskɪtsɵˈfriːniə/) is a mental disorder often characterized by abnormal social behavior and failure to recognize what is real. Common symptoms include false beliefs, unclear or confused thinking, auditory hallucinations, reduced social engagement and emotional expression, and lack of motivation. Diagnosis is based on observed behavior and the person's reported experiences. Genetics and early environment, as well as psychological and social processes, appear to be important contributory factors. Some recreational and prescription drugs appear to cause or worsen symptoms.

Cognitive behavioral therapy CBT has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including mood, anxiety, personality, eating, substance abuse, tic, and psychotic disorders. Many CBT treatment programs for specific disorders have been evaluated for efficacy; the health-care trend of evidence-based treatment, where specific treatments for symptom-based diagnoses are recommended, has favored CBT over other approaches such as psychodynamic treatments.[3] However, other researchers have questioned the validity of such claims to superiority over other treatments.[4][5] History[edit] Philosophical roots[edit] Precursors of certain fundamental aspects of CBT have been identified in various ancient philosophical traditions, particularly Stoicism.[6] For example, Aaron T. Behavior therapy roots[edit]

Psychopathology Psychopathology[a] is the scientific study of mental disorders, including efforts to understand their genetic, biological, psychological, and social causes; effective classification schemes (nosology); course across all stages of development; manifestations; and treatment. As the study of psychiatric disorders[edit] The scientific discipline of psychopathology was founded by Karl Jaspers in 1913, whose object of study were "mental phenomena".

Substance abuse Substance abuse, also known as drug abuse, is a patterned use of a substance (drug) in which the user consumes the substance in amounts or with methods which are harmful to themselves or others. The term "drug abuse" does not exclude dependency, but is otherwise used in a similar manner in nonmedical contexts. The terms have a huge range of definitions related to taking a psychoactive drug or performance enhancing drug for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. This Meditation Exercise Builds Mental Muscle and Cures Procrastination The Awareness-Focus Loop The reason this meditation exercise will work for many of you is because it trains a really specific mental skill, the Awareness-Focus Loop. There are tons of feelings that sit right below your conscious mind. Unaddressed, these feelings actually guide the majority of your decision making. Maybe you’ve heard this as the rider (rational brain) and the elephant (emotional brain).

Asperger syndrome Asperger syndrome (AS), an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is a relatively new diagnosis in the field of autism.[1] It was named in honor of Hans Asperger (1906–80), an Austrian psychiatrist and pediatrician. An English psychiatrist, Lorna Wing, popularized the term "Asperger's syndrome" in a 1981 publication; the first book in English on Asperger syndrome was written by Uta Frith in 1991 and the condition was subsequently recognized in formal diagnostic manuals later in the 1990s.[1] Discovery of autistic psychopathy[edit] Mood disorder English psychiatrist Henry Maudsley proposed an overarching category of affective disorder.[2] The term was then replaced by mood disorder, as the latter term refers to the underlying or longitudinal emotional state,[3] whereas the former refers to the external expression observed by others.[1] Mood disorders fall into the basic groups of elevated mood, such as mania or hypomania; depressed mood, of which the best-known and most researched is major depressive disorder (MDD) (commonly called clinical depression, unipolar depression, or major depression); and moods which cycle between mania and depression, known as bipolar disorder (BD) (formerly known as manic depression). Classification[edit] Depressive disorders[edit] Major depressive disorder (MDD), commonly called major depression, unipolar depression, or clinical depression, wherein a person has one or more major depressive episodes. After a single episode, Major Depressive Disorder (single episode) would be diagnosed.

Psychopathy Hervey M. Cleckley, a US-American psychiatrist, probably influenced the initial diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality reaction/disturbance in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), as did American psychologist George E. Partridge.

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