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Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning
If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. BE FLEXIBLE. The less educators try to control what kids learn, the more students’ voices will be heard and, eventually, their ability to drive their own learning. Laufenberg recalled a group of tenacious students who continued to ask permission to focus their video project on the subject of drugs, despite her repeated objections. 2. Laufenberg’s answer: Get them curious enough in the subject to do research on their own. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/03/11/creating-classrooms-we-need-8-ways-into-inquiry-learning/

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Information Fluency Information Fluency According to Danny Callison, information fluency is the ability to apply the skills associated with information literacy, computer literacy and critical thinking to address and solve information problems across disciplines, across academic levels, and across information format structures. According to The Associated Colleges of the South ( using critical thinking skills and appropriate technologies, information fluency integrates the abilities to: collect the information necessary to consider a problem or issue employ critical thinking skills in the evaluation and analysis of the information and its sources formulate logical conclusions and present those conclusions in an appropriate and effective way Read the article Key Word: Information Fluency (Word document) by Daniel Callison (SLMAM, in press, 2004). View Information Fluency (Real Media - 3:26).

Silvia Tolisano- Langwitches Blog There are, no doubt, many technophobes (among educators and in general) out there. Technophobia is defined by The Free Dictionary as: Related Redefining My Learning Silvana Meneghini and I work as Academic Technology Coordinators at Graded, the American School of São Paulo. " A flashlight in the fog of technology integration", initially the title of a conference workshop proposal, quickly developed into the desire of creating a framework to guide and coach teachers based on… Infographics for Educators We live in a world of quick consumption, bite-size morsels of information, and visualizations of just about everything. All of this has become boiled down into the uber-popular infographic. They pop up from time to time on Edudemic and I often have a tough time determining if I should actually run versus another. I’ve been saving up all of my favorite infographics for a post just like this one.

8 Steps to Create an Infographic 1. Pick a Topic / Collect Data There are many data sources available, such as Google public data, which is a great starting point for data collection. Advertising-Agriculture-Antiques-Architecture-Arts & Crafts-Automotive-Aviation-Books-Chemicals-Collectibles- Communications & Media-Computers-Consulting-Design-Disabilities-Education-Electronics-Employment-Entertainment- Fashion-Financing-Food-Gambling-Games-Government-Health-Hobbies-Home & Garden-Hospitality-Information-Jewelry- Jewelry-Law-Music-Parenting-Retail-Real Estate-Religion RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Retail Management-Science-Security-Software-Sports-Telecommunication-Transportation-Travel-Video-Weather. 2. Find References for Your Material Over 80% of visual is related to color, which conveys information and provides the user with other operational benefits such as a unique identity. 3.

Integrating Technology and Literacy When teaching with digital natives in a digital world, one question facing many educators revolves around integrating technology to help facilitate learning: How do you work technology into the pedagogy, instead of just using something cool? That task can be especially daunting in language arts literacy classrooms where reading and writing skill development is the crux of daily lessons. However, as 1:1 technology initiatives roll out, integrating technology into the classroom is our reality. With hundreds of sites, apps, Chrome extensions, and platforms available, choosing the right ones can seem overwhelming. As an eighth-grade language arts teacher, I've experienced this myself. Following are four tools that can help provide immediate formative assessment data as well as top-of-the-rotation feedback to help students develop personal learning goals.

The Best K-12 Education Technology Blogs If it takes a village to raise a child, how many people does it take to train an educator? It’s hard to say, but 50 helping hands seems like a good place to start. In the spirit of community, collaboration and information sharing, EdTech: Focus on K–12 has rounded up 50 ed-tech blogs that we deem must-reads for the K–12 community. We launched our first Must-Read IT list last year to great response so we hope that you all enjoy this year's batch of blogs as well. These blogs are a mix of voices and include blogs authored by teachers, administrators and technology vendors.

Focusing on the ‘Word Gap’ Is Harmful to Poor Students Why do rich kids end up doing better than poor kids in school? Of late, one common explanation for this has been the “word gap,” or the idea that poor children are exposed to significantly fewer words by age three than their wealthier peers. As a former elementary school teacher and now educational psychologist, I understand the appeal of the “word gap” argument. But, focusing on the “word gap” as an explanation for the achievement gap between poor students and wealthier students is both distracting and potentially harmful. Such an explanation could allow educators at all levels to both deny and widen this real gap that exists between the rich and the poor kids. What is the ‘word gap’?

Great Teaching Means Letting Go Great Teaching Means Letting Go by Grant Wiggins, Ed.D, Authentic Education My greatest learning as a teacher came on the soccer field. We had been working for a few weeks on the same key ‘moves’ on the field related to creating ‘space’. After a few practices, the team looked good in the drills – they’ve got it! Silent majority: A crisis is brewing in basic education In the background of the student protests stand the silent majority – young, mainly black, South Africans deprived of a decent basic education in a democratic South Africa. Many don’t finish school, let alone university. If the student movement is a fuse, this silent majority may well be the powder keg. Many people warned the government about an impending student fees crisis, including a ministerial committee chaired by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa. Yet the government was caught flatfooted by the conflagration that engulfed universities, Parliament and the very seat of its power at the Union Buildings over the last fortnight.

Steve Hargadon - The Future of Education Steve Hargadon is director of the Web 2.0 Labs, host of the Future of Education interview series, chair of the Learning 2.0 Conference and the Social Learning Summit, and co-chair the annual Global Education and Library 2.0 worldwide conferences. He has pioneered both the use of social networking in education (creating the now 70,000 member Classroom 2.0 social network in 2007) and the massive peer-to-peer professional development of his virtual conferences. He has supported and encouraged the development of thousands of other education networks and events, particularly for professional development.

How One School Creatively Boosted Student Achievement Mr. DeMaio and other teachers star in a video about times tables. It’s not only at Halloween time that the Memorial School students in Union Beach, New Jersey, see their teachers in costumes. This faculty gets dressed up year-round to perform in instructional videos for kids to access online. Chris Lehmann - Inquiry: The Very First Step In the Process of Learning Chris Lehmann is the founding principal of the Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In November of 2012, Chris was named one of Dell's #Inspire100 - one of the 100 people changing the world using Social Media. In April of 2012, Chris won the Lindback Award for Excellence in Principal Leadership in the School District of Philadelphia. In September of 2011, Chris was honored by the White House as a Champion of Change for his work in education reform. SLA is built on the notion that inquiry is the very first step in the process of learning.

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