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Standards and Curriculum - Library Services

Standards and Curriculum - Library Services
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Guided Inquiry - CISSL Kim, Sun Un & Todd, R. J. The Information Search Process of English Language Learner (ELL) Students in a Guided Inquiry Project: An In-depth Case Study of Two Korean High School Students in the United States. Paper presented at the Annual Conference and Research Forum of the International Association of School Librarianship, Berkeley, California August 2008. CD Publication. Empire State Information Fluency Continuum A new resource, called the Empire State Information Fluency Continuum, is now available thanks to the NYC School Library System. This resource emphasizes the importance of inquiry in learning and establishes information fluency standards for grades K-12, which are aligned with Common Core Learning Standards. The fusion of the two sets of standards aims to create students who are capable of absorbing and applying appropriate information to any situation. The document identifies three information literacy standards which encourage students to be thinkers, explorers, and citizens and outlines the essential steps of inquiry: connect, wonder, investigate, construct, express, and reflect. The continuum also includes grade-specific benchmarks for information skill development and sample diagrams and worksheets which may be used to assess students’ progress.

Plagiarism Quiz 9-10: Master You're a plagiarism expert! Continue writing originally and bolstering ideas with properly cited sources. Tweet how awesome you are and share it with your classmates, friends, or instructors! 7-9: Pro You're a citation pro! 5-7: In-Training You’re still learning the ins and outs of plagiarism. 1-5: Newbie According to your score, you may be in danger of plagiarizing.

Student Learning Objectives Webinar Series II (Fall 2012) Skip to main content Search form Student Learning Objectives Webinar Series II (2012-13) You are here Home » Student Learning Objectives Webinar Series II (2012-13) You may also be interested in these Student Learning Objectives Pages The New York State Education Department (NYSED) is committed to providing district leaders, teachers, and principals support as they develop and implement Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). 1. Student Learning Objectives for Librarians Using the NYSAA in the Development of SLOs Student Learning Objectives 101 for Teachers Student Learning Objectives 102 for Teachers Student Learning Objectives 103 for Teachers Student Learning Objectives: The 50% Rule for Teachers School-wide Student Learning Objectives Student Learning Objectives 101 for Principals Student Learning Objectives 102 for Principals Created on: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 Tags: student learning objectives Resource Type: General Supporting Materials Video Topic: Teacher/Leader Effectiveness EngageNY Terms of Use

AASL Advocacy Brochures Advocacy Brochure Series Helps School Librarians Speak to Stakeholders Developed and distributed through a grant from the Bound to Stay Bound Books Foundation, the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) presents a new advocacy tool to help school librarians generate and guide discussion with stakeholders about quality school library programs. School Library Programs Improve Student Learning is a series of advocacy brochures each designed to speak to a specific stakeholder audience within the school library community, including administrators, policymakers, parents, and teachers. The School Library Programs Improve Student Learning brochure series unfolds AASL’s Standards for the 21st-Century Learner and Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Programs in a way that allows each stakeholder group to visualize a model school library program from their perspective. Downloading and Ordering Interested in customizing your brochure?

Badges for Higher Education This group is focused on finding ways badges work well in higher education. Higher learning institutions have the potential to accept badges in the admissions evaluation process as well as as issuers credentialing course content and informal learning experiences. This group explores these and a range of related issues, such as supporting disciplinary research into badges (more details). Higher Education Resources Survey Data: (2014 cycle preliminary report)Examples of digital badges in higher education: The Higher Ed working group completed its first cycle at the end of 2014, and is being reconvened under the leadership of Dan Hickey, James Willis and Carla Casilli for a second cycle as of July 2015. In addition, join the Google Group to stay up-to-date on the Higher Education Working Group.

12 Ways to Be More Search Savvy Google has made it possible for us to have instant information gratification. Just start typing the first letters of your search word and the site intuits your question and offers you the smartest choice of answers. Seems simple enough. But as quick and facile as the process is, there are ways to be even more efficient, more search-savvy. CONTROL F. To those who wonder if Google is making us stupid, Russell has a pithy response: “Plato said that about books.” I better go search that. NCHS Research Rubric.pdf School Research Rubric Template Research Standard: Students will engage in research by locating, critically selecting, interpreting, organizing, and synthesizing information from print, non-print, and electronic sources to increase knowledge, solve problems, and construct meaning. Descriptor Locating/Critically Selecting Synthesizing/Constructing Meaning/ Solving Problems Presenting/Applying Increased Knowledge Advanced Students:  demonstrate facility with a variety of media (eg. print, non-print, electronic)  use varied sources that represent several different perspectives  use the most valid, timely and reliable sources  select content that progressively depends and refines initial purpose  consistently keep main question in mind  consistently make an organized, logical argument  consistently integrate relevant information into a coherent whole  consistently interpret information to draw valid conclusions  present an original, clear and provocative arguments proper citation Exceeds Goal of view Basic

The Top 8 Free/Open Source LMSs Update 10/26/16: Back by popular demand! We saw your comments and decided to incorporate the free LMSs you told us about. We’ve also upgraded our honorable mentions into full entries in order to give you better information about each one. I have a friend who once wrapped his entire body, head to toe, in tin foil. He also wrote “steak + guacamole” on himself in permanent marker, and then sauntered (in public, on public sidewalks with normal people all around) to his local burrito joint. He endured the stares, embarrassment, and giggles all for one, glorious thing: a free burrito. People will do a lot just to get something for free. I’ve collected a list of the very best freemium, totally free, and/or open source LMSs out there, and it’s all below, no enduring of awkward stares on the sidewalk required. 1. This is the gorilla in the room of open source LMSs. Moodle’s welcome screen Differentiating features Pros/cons Review it here! 2. An example of creating a lesson plan in CourseSites 3. 4. 5.

Punctuation, symbols & operators in search - Search Help You can use symbols or words in your search to make your search results more precise. Google Search usually ignores punctuation that isn’t part of a search operator. Don’t put spaces between the symbol or word and your search term. A search for site:nytimes.com will work, but site: nytimes.com won’t. Search social media Put @ in front of a word to search social media. Search for a price Put $ in front of a number. Search hashtags Put # in front of a word. Exclude words from your search Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. Search for an exact match Put a word or phrase inside quotes. Search within a range of numbers Put .. between two numbers. Combine searches Put "OR" between each search query. Search for a specific site Put "site:" in front of a site or domain. Search for related sites Put "related:" in front of a web address you already know. See Google’s cached version of a site Put "cache:" in front of the site address.

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