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Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Government Surveillance (HBO) - Edward Snowden

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Government Surveillance (HBO) - Edward Snowden

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEVlyP4_11M

Related:  Privacy & Security 2Privacy & IdentityUnraveling the Veil

Apple boss Tim Cook hits out at Facebook and Google - BBC News Apple chief Tim Cook has made a thinly veiled attack on Facebook and Google for "gobbling up" users' personal data. In a speech, he said people should not have to "make trade-offs between privacy and security". While not naming Facebook and Google explicitly, he attacked companies that "built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency". Rights activists Privacy International told the BBC it had some scepticism about Mr Cook's comments. "It is encouraging to see Apple making the claim that they collect less information on us than their competitors," Privacy International's technologist Dr Richard Tynan said. After Senate vote, NSA prepares to shut down phone tracking program Hours after the Senate balked at reauthorizing the bulk collection of U.S. telephone records, the National Security Agency began shutting down a controversial program Saturday that senior intelligence and law enforcement officials say is vital to track terrorists in the United States. The Senate had debated into early predawn hours Saturday but failed to reach a deal to reform the program or extend its life beyond May 31, when the law used to authorize it is set to expire. Lawmakers then left on a weeklong recess, vowing to return at the end of it to try again in a rare Sunday session. Administration officials said later that they had to start the lengthy procedure of winding down the counter-terrorism program in anticipation of Congress failing to act. “That process has begun,” an administration official said Saturday. The data include the number dialed, duration, date and time for most telephone calls made by Americans.

Your Lifestyle Has Already Been Designed (The Real Reason For The Forty-Hour Workweek) By David Cain / raptitude.com Well I’m in the working world again. I’ve found myself a well-paying gig in the engineering industry, and life finally feels like it’s returning to normal after my nine months of traveling. Edward Snowden: The World Says No to Surveillance Photo MOSCOW — TWO years ago today, three journalists and I worked nervously in a Hong Kong hotel room, waiting to see how the world would react to the revelation that the National Security Agency had been making records of nearly every phone call in the United States. In the days that followed, those journalists and others published documents revealing that democratic governments had been monitoring the private activities of ordinary citizens who had done nothing wrong.

You Can Be Prosecuted for Clearing Your Browser History Khairullozhori Matanov, a friend of the Boston bomber, is being sentenced under a law whose purview is growing disturbingly wide. Matanov and his lawyer Paul Glickman stand before Judge Marianne B. Bowler on Friday, May 30, 2014 in Boston. Welcome to Forbes Target has got you in its aim Every time you go shopping, you share intimate details about your consumption patterns with retailers. And many of those retailers are studying those details to figure out what you like, what you need, and which coupons are most likely to make you happy. Target, for example, has figured out how to data-mine its way into your womb, to figure out whether you have a baby on the way long before you need to start buying diapers. Charles Duhigg outlines in the New York Times how Target tries to hook parents-to-be at that crucial moment before they turn into rampant — and loyal — buyers of all things pastel, plastic, and miniature. He talked to Target statistician Andrew Pole — before Target freaked out and cut off all communications — about the clues to a customer’s impending bundle of joy.

House committee approves bill to end NSA phone records program A U.S. Congress committee has overwhelmingly approved legislation designed to stop the bulk collection of U.S. phone records by the National Security Agency. The 25-2 vote in the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee sends the USA Freedom Act to the House floor for a vote. The two votes against the bill came from lawmakers who had argued for stronger protections for civil liberties. The legislation is a stronger version of a similar bill that passed the House last May but stalled in the Senate, sponsors said. New police radars can 'see' inside homes Radar devices allowing officers to detect movement through walls have been secretly used by at least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies over the last two years. VPC WASHINGTON — At least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies have secretly equipped their officers with radar devices that allow them to effectively peer through the walls of houses to see whether anyone is inside, a practice raising new concerns about the extent of government surveillance. Those agencies, including the FBI and the U.S. Marshals Service, began deploying the radar systems more than two years ago with little notice to the courts and no public disclosure of when or how they would be used. The technology raises legal and privacy issues because the U.S.

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