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Why Talking About the Brain Can Empower Learners

Why Talking About the Brain Can Empower Learners
Knowledge about how the brain works can make a big difference when confronting difficult learning situations. If you have a growth mindset and are aware of the ability to improve oneself, a challenge can be welcome (versus those with a fixed mindset who are averse to the failures a challenge may bring). Stanford University professor of psychology Carol Dweck, who has been leading the research in this field, discusses “The power of believing that you can improve” in this TED talk. In one example, she talks about students who made vast improvements on test scores once they learned about the growth mindset: “This happened because the meaning of effort and difficulty were transformed. Before, effort and difficulty made them feel dumb, made them feel like giving up, but now, effort and difficulty, that’s when their neurons are making new connections, stronger connections.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/12/23/why-talking-about-the-brain-can-empower-learners/

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Teaching students that intelligence can grow and blossom with effort – rather than being a fixed trait they’re just born with – is gaining traction in progressive education circles. And new research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a “growth mindset” can help many kids understand their true potential. The new research involves larger, more rigorous field trials that provide some of the first evidence that the social psychology strategy can be effective when implemented in schools on a wide scale. Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that.

Carol Dweck: 'The whole idea of growth mindset is to say yes they can' Carol Dweck is education’s guru of the moment. The US academic’s “growth mindset” theory has taken schools on both sides of the Atlantic by storm. When TES met the Stanford University psychology professor at the Festival of Education at Wellington College last week, the mere mention of her name was sending teachers into shivers of excitement. Growth Mindsets: Creating Motivation and Productivity The key to success and achieving our goals is not necessarily persistence, hard work and focus. These behaviours are the by-product of something else. What is actually critical to our success is our mindset. Mindsets are beliefs about ourselves and our most basic qualities, such as intelligence, talents and personality. We all have innate talents and skills, things that we are naturally good at or that set us apart from other people. The trap that we can fall into is believing that we are special, that we are smarter than other people and do not have to work hard to be successful.

leading and learning: Education Readings John Hattie / literacy/ Finland/ Inquiry learning/ and more Sir Ken Robinson By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz This week’s homework! Hattie’s research: Is wrong Part 4 – a kind of Svengali Establishing A Growth Mindset As A Teacher: 9 Affirming Statements Establishing A Growth Mindset As A Teacher: 9 Statements Of Affirmation by Terry Heick The ability to change is among the least-appreciated professional characteristics of a teacher. This is especially true as education systems react to both external pressure, and internal instinct to change into something closer to truly progressive learning environments. As I was reading through Jackie Gerstein’s Education 3.0: Altering Round Peg in Round Hole Education, several slides stood out to me (one was the focus of a post earlier this week) including the image above, which offers statements teachers can use to both affirm the need for change, and “coach” themselves into a mindset for both change, and hopefully growth.

5 Strategies For Creating A Genius Mindset In Students How Can We Help Every Student Tap Their Inner Genius? by Zacc Dukowitz, Learnbop.com When we hear the word genius, certain people come immediately to mind—Albert Einstein in mathematics, or Warren Buffett in investing—but what exactly sets these people apart? It’s easy to simply shrug and say to ourselves, “Those people are just different. They have something most people don’t, and it’s as simple as that.” But the steps taken to arrive at a place of genius are actually more concrete, and have less to do with innate talent, than you might think.

Evolution and Imagination: Teaching Growth vs Fixed Mindsets Showed these videos to my Year 11's today - Nearly every student had a set idea on what their own mindsets were. What was becoming increasingly clear was the amount of students who had a fixed mindset - compared with those who have a growth mindset - also had some negative thoughts about themselves and their own learning - or ability/inability to learn. What I found was that most students correlated their growth/fixed mindsets to how they saw themselves achieving in particular subjects. Students said that in specific classes they had a growth mindset because they enjoyed the subject. While others knew inherently the reason they had a fixed mindset was because they did not think they were 'good' at that subject for reason x.

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies In his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.” That’s a disconcerting message, and hard to believe at first. But it’s also unexpectedly liberating, because Carey further explains that many things we think of as detractors from learning — like forgetting, distractions, interruptions or sleeping rather than hitting the books — aren’t necessarily bad after all. They can actually work in your favor, according to a body of research that offers surprising insights and simple, doable strategies for learning more effectively. Society has ingrained in us “a monkish conception of what learning is, of you sitting with your books in your cell,” Carey told MindShift.

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