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7 Books That Will Change How You See The World

7 Books That Will Change How You See The World
If you’re a human and you have a brain, then you probably like using your brain. And if you like using your brain, then you love having those epiphany moments where your hair blows back and you go “Whoa” like Keanu Reeves in The Matrix when he learns Kung Fu from a USB drive in his neck. I know it’s not what the cool kids like to do, but I like to read non-fiction. Lots of non-fiction. And my favorite moments reading non-fiction are when a book bitchslaps my brain and reconfigures my entire understanding of reality and my place within it. I love that. I get a lot of emails asking me for book recommendations. So instead of divulging what my favorite books are, I’ll leave you with something better: seven of the most mind-fucking, reality-reshaping, Keanu Reeves “Whoa” inspiring books that I’ve ever read. In no particular order… Stumbling on Happiness by Daniel Gilbert What It’s About: Stumbling on Happiness is like the red-headed stepchild of happiness books. Notable Quotes: by Nassim Taleb

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No, You Can't Have It All I saw a story on Facebook the other day. Like most stories that get passed around Facebook, it’s probably only 38% true and written by a 16-year-old. But regardless, I found it cool, and at the very least, thought-provoking. It was about a man named Mohammed El-Erian. Mohammed was the CEO of an uber $2 trillion bond fund called PIMCO and earned upwards of $100 million per year. In January, he unexpectedly resigned in order to spend more time with his 10-year-old daughter. johnnylists 1. How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff – A mind opening look at how statistics can be manipulated to dazzle and deceive you. 2. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks – Take a look at neurological diseases and how one man could mistake his wife for a hat and not even realize it. 3.

The Four Stages of Life Life is a bitch. Then you die. So while staring at my navel the other day, I decided that that bitch happens in four stages. 5 Life Lessons from 5 Years of Traveling the World Almost five years ago today, my apartment lease expired, I shipped a few boxes to my mom’s house, packed a suitcase to (hopefully) last me a few months, and took off across the Atlantic. I had less than $1,000 in my bank account. The first stop was Paris, where, still reeling from breaking up with my girlfriend, selling all of my possessions, and maintaining an online business that was hardly making any money, I proceeded to sulk and gripe my way through the streets of La Ville-Lumiére totally not appreciating what was around me. Eventually, things got better though. And I moved on.

The Red and the Black Le Rouge et le Noir (French pronunciation: ​[lə ʁuʒ e lə nwaʁ]; French for The Red and the Black) is a historical psychological novel in two volumes by Stendhal, published in 1830.[1] It chronicles the attempts of a provincial young man to rise socially beyond his modest upbringing through a combination of talent, hard work, deception, and hypocrisy—yet who ultimately allows his passions to betray him. The novel’s full title, Le Rouge et le Noir: Chronique du XIXe siècle (The Red and the Black: A Chronicle of the 19th Century),[2] indicates its two-fold literary purpose as both a psychological portrait of the romantic protagonist, Julien Sorel, and an analytic, sociological satire of the French social order under the Bourbon Restoration (1814–30). In English, Le Rouge et le Noir is variously translated as Red and Black, Scarlet and Black, and The Red and the Black, without the sub-title.[3] §Background[edit] §Plot[edit]

Well, At Least There Was Good Stuff to Read: The Books of the Decade Anybody remember how anxious and thrilled we were in those last months of the 20th century? When we weren't at war and we had a budget surplus and it looked like Al Gore would be president? The prospect of a 21st century filled with new technologies, new art and literature loomed large and bright. But now, as we look back at what was decidedly a shitty decade for an incredible variety of people in an equally incredible variety of ways (evictions/invasions/bombings/etc), it's surprisingly hard to be pessimistic about the books that assessed, satirized, dramatized and distracted us from the events of the past 10 years. Goethe said that the decline of a nation's literature is the precursor to that nation's fall, and with this look back at the books that defined the decade, we'd like to tell Goethe to suck it. Almost in spite of ourselves, we're still writing, translating, publishing and even occasionally buying good books in this country.

Are You An Emotional Vampire? Here’s a quick quiz for you to take. Answer the following questions. Be as honest as possible: Do you feel that people often don’t (or can’t) understand you or your problems? 12 Greatest Apocalyptic Novels Of All Time After scouring book reviews and Wikipedia, a list of the Top 12 Best Apocalyptic Novels was born. The books on this list take you down the darkest paths in uncivilized worlds, from cannibalistic gangs to vampire infected corpses. If this list doesn't get you thinking on the quickest way stock your basement full of water, canned goods and rifles, I don't know what will! Enjoy!

The Most Important Question of Your Life Everybody wants what feels good. Everyone wants to live a carefree, happy and easy life, to fall in love and have amazing sex and relationships, to look perfect and make money and be popular and well-respected and admired and a total baller to the point that people part like the Red Sea when you walk into the room. Everyone would like that — it’s easy to like that. If I ask you, “What do you want out of life?” and you say something like, “I want to be happy and have a great family and a job I like,” it’s so ubiquitous that it doesn’t even mean anything.

Math 101: A reading list for lifelong learners Ready to level up your working knowledge of math? Here’s what to read now — and next. Math 101, with Jennifer Ouellette First, start with these 5 books… Math 101: A reading list for lifelong learners Ready to level up your working knowledge of math? Here’s what to read now — and next. Math 101, with Jennifer Ouellette 1book140: Vote for a Nonfiction Book to Read in March After spending two evenings compiling and researching our many #1book140 nominations for March, I'd like to share a note I made to myself: “Nonfiction” might be an overly broad category for a typical month. Maybe next time, we should limit voting to no more than eight options (and not the fifteen below)? That said, the occasional free-for-all voting period can be fun, too.

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