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Eportfolios for Meaningful Student Learning

Eportfolios for Meaningful Student Learning
Related:  Digital Research

How to Build Your E-Learning Portfolio – Part 2 This post is one in a four-part series for How to Build Your E-learning Portfolio. You can read Part 1 here. Common Challenges I understand that building your portfolio can be challenging. Maybe you aren’t legally allowed to share your work samples because they’re controlled goods or you’ve signed an air-tight Non-Disclosure Agreement;Maybe you don’t have time…we’re not all Beyonce; orMaybe you don’t know where to begin. My goal here is to become your portfolio-building sensei and hold your hand through this entire process. Challenging Yourself Now, you may already feel challenged by those challenges impacting your lack of portfolio, but I’m asking you to challenge yourself even more! Before taking the leap into full-time independent contractor-ship, I knew that I needed some sort of portfolio. At first I wallowed, but then I had some real-talk with myself, got serious, and created my first two portfolio pieces. Portfolio Piece # 1 Click to view interaction. Portfolio Piece #2

APA Formatting and Style Guide Summary: APA (American Psychological Association) style is most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences. This resource, revised according to the 6th edition, second printing of the APA manual, offers examples for the general format of APA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the reference page. Contributors: Joshua M. Please use the example at the bottom of this page to cite the Purdue OWL in APA. To see a side-by-side comparison of the three most widely used citation styles, including a chart of all APA citation guidelines, see the Citation Style Chart. You can also watch our APA vidcast series on the Purdue OWL YouTube Channel. General APA Guidelines Your essay should be typed and double-spaced on standard-sized paper (8.5" x 11"), with 1" margins on all sides. Include a page header (also known as the "running head") at the top of every page. Major Paper Sections Title Page Running head: TITLE OF YOUR PAPER Image Caption: APA Title Page Abstract

JISC Guide... Using digital media for your eportfolio e-Portfolios are an important part of many learners' academic life. This advice document introduces the concept of an e-Portfolio and explains how digital media can be used effectively. Introduction There are many definitions of what constitutes an e-Portfolio. Looking at the commonalities in a range of definitions gives us a simplified definition: an e-Portfolio is a number of independent digital artefacts that are grouped together to demonstrate a range of skills and competencies of the creator. This definition is further clarified by our sister service JISC infoNet, who have an in-depth infokit on the topic of e-Portfolios and define it as: ... an e-portfolio is a product created by learners, a collection of digital artefacts articulating learning (both formal and informal), experiences and achievements. Our advice document focuses on the use of digital media as a tool to support the processes element of an e-Portfolio. Key facts Stakeholders Format of an e-Portfolio Tools or systems Mahara

EasyBib What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning The following excerpt is from “Authentic Learning in the Digital Age: Engaging Students Through Inquiry,” by Larissa Pahomov. This excerpt is from the chapter entitled “Making Reflection Relevant.” Characteristics of Meaningful Reflection For student reflection to be meaningful, it must be metacognitive, applicable, and shared with others. Let’s look at each of these characteristics in turn. Metacognitive Although it’s something of a buzz word, “metacognition” is a state of mind that can be useful for all the core values presented in this book. When children are first learning to reflect on their work, their educators use simple prompts to get them thinking: Do you like what you made? Of course, there’s a danger of this metacognition turning into a kind of feedback loop: Am I reflecting adequately on my reflection? ➤ The digital connection. Applicable This kind of isolated, after-the-fact reflection dominates our understanding of the process. ➤ The digital connection. Shared

EasyBib: Free Bibliography Generator - MLA, APA, Chicago citation styles Home - FolioSpaces free ePortfolio - 2GB free storage - free institutional hosting - teachers - students - school - college - university ​‘Picture This’: A Step by Step Guide on Digital Learning Portfolios in the Classroom It’s hard to talk about “Digital Learning Portfolios” without really knowing what they are. At the Dreamyard Project, a collaboration between the Bronx’s Dreamyard Preparatory School and the Parsons New School of Design, this illustration below is what we think it is, and what we all agree that a digital portfolio should be. I had the lucky fortune to be involved in this collaborative project, and played a role in making this happen at my particular school. Developing a “Digital Learning Portfolio” culture at your school is a huge undertaking, and in order to prepare, one should understand a few key things that will help make these portfolios a success. Teach students about organization: Your students need to be master file organizers. Following these guidelines will provide a space for you all to follow the Dreamyard journey and try out some of the things we are doing. Step 1: Content, Content, Content Have your students create as much content as possible before publishing.

www.creativebloq.com/design-tools/data-visualization-712402 It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it's becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams. Get Adobe Creative Cloud One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it's also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn't be apparent from looking at stats alone. As author, data journalist and information designer David McCandless said in his TED talk: "By visualizing information, we turn it into a landscape that you can explore with your eyes, a sort of information map. There are many different ways of telling a story, but everything starts with an idea.

Online Portfolio Tools Much of this work began with my Online Portfolio Adventure, where I recreated my presentation portfolio with at least 33 different online services, software and strategies between September 2004 and the present time. In 2006, I began exploring the use of Web 2.0 tools, and constructed portfolios using these tools. One advantage of Web 2.0 tools is that many of them are free, although WikiSpaces may place ads on the page. There is some concern about security in a K-12 school environment, so care should be taken when using these tools with children. In a recent blog entry, I discussed different Online Portfolio Strategies and developed a GoogleDocs page to compare a few of the different choices available.

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