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Kabbalah

Kabbalah

Free Kabbalah Course - Kabbalah Education Center, Bnei Baruch Every Wednesday for 12 Weeks 1) Introduction To Kabbalah What is (and is not) Kabbalah? 2) Where Did You Come From? The ultimate contradiction about having a Creator: If there is a Creator that’s all good and loving, then why is there so much suffering? 3) Who Are You? How do you perceive reality? 4) Where Do Your Thoughts & Desires Come From? The Kabbalistic allegory about the host and the guest and how it relates to you.Three approaches to your thoughts & desires:1) Unconsciously being under their control, 2) Suppressing them, 3) Rising above them.How can you make a change? 5) The Language of Kabbalah: Roots and Branches What is the most common misconception about what the Bible and other Kabbalistic texts describe? 6) How To Make World Peace A Reality Humanity’s globalization and today’s global crisis explained by Kabbalah.How to use nature’s examples to model a perfect existence for humanity.Why have all attempts toward a peaceful existence among humanity failed? 11) Special Q&A Session

Third eye A Cambodian Shiva head showing a third eye. In some traditions such as Hinduism, the third eye is said to be located around the middle of the forehead, slightly above the junction of the eyebrows. In other traditions, as in Theosophy, it is believed to be connected with the pineal gland. In religion[edit] Hindu tradition associates the third eye with the ajna, or brow, chakra.[1] In Taoism and many traditional Chinese religious sects such as Chan (a cousin to the Zen school), "third eye training" involves focusing attention on the point between the eyebrows with the eyes closed, and while the body is in various qigong postures. According to the Christian teaching of Father Richard Rohr, the concept of the third eye is a metaphor for non-dualistic thinking; the way the mystics see. Adherents of theosophist H.P. See also[edit] References[edit] Citations[edit] ^ Jump up to: a b Richard Cavendish, ed. (1994). Bibliography[edit] Hale, Teresa (1999).

Gilgul Gilgul/Gilgul neshamot/Gilgulei Ha Neshamot (Heb. גלגול הנשמות, Plural: גלגולים Gilgulim) describes a Kabbalistic concept of reincarnation. In Hebrew, the word gilgul means "cycle" and neshamot is the plural for "souls." Souls are seen to "cycle" through "lives" or "incarnations", being attached to different human bodies over time. History of the concept of Gilgul in Jewish thought[edit] The notion of reincarnation, while held as a mystical belief by some, is not an essential tenet of traditional Judaism. Among well known Rabbis who rejected the idea of reincarnation are Saadia Gaon, David Kimhi, Hasdai Crescas, Yedayah Bedershi (early 14th century), Joseph Albo, Abraham ibn Daud and Leon de Modena. The idea of gilgul became popular in Jewish folk belief, and is found in much Yiddish literature among Ashkenazi Jews. Jewish process of Gilgul in Kabbalah[edit] Expression of Divine compassion[edit] Spiritual dimension of all Creations[edit] Above-conscious root of Gilgul[edit]

Da'at For the band, see Dååth. In Da'at, all sephirot exist in their perfected state of infinite sharing. The three sephirot of the left column that would receive and conceal the Divine Light, instead share and reveal it. Since all sephirot radiate infinite self-giving Divine Light, it is no longer possible to distinguish one sephira from another, thus they are one. Da'at is not always depicted in representations of the sefirot, and could in a sense be considered an "empty slot" into which the gem of any other sefirot can be placed. As a representative sephirah[edit] As spiritual state[edit] The spiritual state corresponding to the sephirah of Daat is yichud ("unification"). In the occult belief-system of Thelema, the Night of Pan is related to the progression through Da'at. As aspect of intellect[edit] According to the Tanya, Da'at is the third and last conscious power of intellect. Levels[edit] Lower level[edit] Non-Jewish Kabbalah[edit] See also[edit] Da'as Elyon and Da'as Tachton References[edit]

Derinkuyu Derinkuyu is a town and district of Nevşehir Province in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey. According to 2010 census, population of the district is 22,114 of which 10,679 live in the town of Derinkuyu.[3][4] The district covers an area of 445 km2 (172 sq mi),[5] and the average elevation is 1,300 m (4,265 ft), with the highest point being Mt. Ertaş at 1,988 m (6,522 ft). Located in Cappadocia, Derinkuyu is notable for its large multi-level underground city (Derinkuyu Underground City), which is a major tourist attraction. The historical region of Cappadocia, where Derinkuyu is situated, contains several historical underground cities, carved out of a unique geological formation. They are not generally occupied. History[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Coordinates:

Tree of life (Kabbalah) The Tree of Life, or Etz haChayim (עץ החיים) in Hebrew, is a classic descriptive term for the central mystical symbol used in the Kabbalah of esoteric Judaism, also known as the 10 Sephirot. Its diagrammatic representation, arranged in 3 columns/pillars, derives from Christian and esoteric sources and is not known to the earlier Jewish tradition.[citation needed] The tree, visually or conceptually, represents as a series of divine emanations God's creation itself ex nihilo, the nature of revealed divinity, the human soul, and the spiritual path of ascent by man. In this way, Kabbalists developed the symbol into a full model of reality, using the tree to depict a map of Creation. The symbolic configuration of 10 spiritual principles (11 can be shown, of which - Keter and Da'at are interchangeable), From the Renaissance onwards, the Jewish mystical concept was adopted by some esoterically inclined Christians as well as some Hermeticists. In Zoroastrianism: In Buddhism:

Raghuvaṃśa Raghuvamsa (Sanskrit: रघुवंश, Raghuvaṃśa) is a Sanskrit mahakavya (epic poem) by the most celebrated Sanskrit poet Kalidasa. It narrates, in 19 sargas (cantos), the stories related to the Raghu dynasty, namely the family of Dilipa and his descendants up to Agnivarna, who include Raghu, Dasharatha and Rama. The earliest surviving commentary written on the work is that of the 10th-century Kashmirian scholar Vallabhadeva.[1] The most popular and widely available commentary, however, is the Sanjivani, written by Mallinatha (ca.1350-1450). Geographical and historical references[edit] The warrior Raghu leads a military expedition to Transoxiana. He defeats and subjugates local people along the way (presumably on his march through Central Asia) until he reaches the Vankshu, as the ancient Indians called the Oxus River. After crossing the Oxus, Raghu and his army encountered the Kambojas, an ancient Indo-Scythian people often mentioned in Indian texts. Metres used in the epic[edit] See also[edit]

Sephirot Sephirot (/sfɪˈroʊt/, /ˈsfɪroʊt/; Hebrew: סְפִירוֹת‎ Səphîrôṯ), meaning emanations, are the 10 attributes/emanations in Kabbalah, through which Ein Sof (The Infinite) reveals himself and continuously creates both the physical realm and the chain of higher metaphysical realms (Seder hishtalshelus). The term is alternatively transliterated into English as Sefirot/Sefiroth, singular Sephirah/Sefirah etc. Alternative configurations of the sephirot are given by different schools in the historical development of Kabbalah, with each articulating different spiritual aspects. The tradition of enumerating 10 is stated in the Sefer Yetzirah, "Ten sephirot of nothingness, ten and not nine, ten and not eleven". As altogether 11 sephirot are listed across the different schemes, two (Keter and Daat) are seen[by whom?] as unconscious and conscious manifestations of the same principle, conserving the ten categories[citation needed]. Ten Sephirot[edit] Listings[edit] Description[by whom?] [edit] Notes[edit]

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