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Build an Atom

Build an Atom

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Neutron The neutron is a subatomic hadron particle that has the symbol n or n0. Neutrons have no net electric charge and a mass slightly larger than that of a proton. With the exception of hydrogen-1, the nucleus of every atom consists of at least one or more of both protons and neutrons. Protons and neutrons are collectively referred to as "nucleons". Motion: Laws of Motion There was this fellow in England named Sir Isaac Newton. A little bit stuffy, bad hair, but quite an intelligent guy. He worked on developing calculus and physics at the same time. Cathode Ray Tube Simulation By Dan Damelin The Interactions project is developing a new interdisciplinary semester-long course that lays the foundation for deeper understanding in physics, chemistry and biology. This ninth grade course, developed in partnership with the CREATE for STEM Institute at Michigan State University and the University of Michigan, is inspired by the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the NGSS, which encourage students to learn science by engaging in science practices.

Distillation Laboratory display of distillation: 1: A source of heat 2: Still pot 3: Still head 4: Thermometer/Boiling point temperature 5: Condenser 6: Cooling water in 7: Cooling water out 8: Distillate/receiving flask 9: Vacuum/gas inlet 10: Still receiver 11: Heat control 12: Stirrer speed control 13: Stirrer/heat plate 14: Heating (Oil/sand) bath 15: Stirring means e.g. (shown), boiling chips or mechanical stirrer 16: Cooling bath.[1] History[edit] Clear evidence of the distillation of alcohol comes from the School of Salerno in the 12th century.[2][5] Fractional distillation was developed by Tadeo Alderotti in the 13th century.[6] Simple Mechanics Cams The basic principle of the cam is to turn a circular motion into a linear one. This is referred to as reciprocating movement. In it's simplest form you turn a handle to make something move up and down.

Atomic orbital The shapes of the first five atomic orbitals: 1s, 2s, 2px, 2py, and 2pz. The colors show the wave function phase. These are graphs of ψ(x, y, z) functions which depend on the coordinates of one electron. To see the elongated shape of ψ(x, y, z)2 functions that show probability density more directly, see the graphs of d-orbitals below. plant structure bi Seed Plant Overview: The plant body consists of two basic parts--- the shoot system and the root system Shoot system is above ground and includes organs such as leaves, buds, stems, flowers, and fruits The functions of the shoot system include photosynthesis, reproduction, storage, transport, and hormone production The root system is below ground and includes roots as well as modified stem structures such as tubers and rhizomes The functions of the root system include anchorage, absorption, storage, transport, and production of certain hormones Seed plants contain 2 types of vascular tissue (xylem & phloem) to help transport water, minerals, & food throughout the root & shoot systems Plant cells have several specialized structures including a central vacuole for storage, plastids for storage of pigments, and a thick cell wall of cellulose Plant cells are all box-shaped in appearance Meristems: Root Tip with Meristems Specialized Plant Cells:

Just How Small Is an Atom? - TedED Whether we’re zooming in to the wavelength of a gamma ray or zooming out to the size of a galaxy, it can be difficult to wrap our heads around the big numbers we’re measuring—like nanometers (10-9meters) or gigameters (109). Take a look at these efforts to represent big numbers. What are the strengths of each? How would you represent a large number (like a gigameter)? Cary Huang: The Scale of the Universe 2 NOVA: A Sense of Scale: String Theory Chris Jordan pictures some shocking stats More than 2,400 years ago, the Greek philosopher Democritus began thinking about how many times matter could be divided. He proposed that there were, in fact, tiny, indivisible pieces of matter that he called “atomos,” meaning “not to be cut.”

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