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Rubric Gallery: List of public rubrics: RCampus

Rubric Gallery: List of public rubrics: RCampus

http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshellc.cfm?mode=gallery&sms=publicrub

Related:  Feedback: Collegefeedback

Getting feedback right Part 1 – Why do we give it It’s become a truism that feedback is the most important activity that teachers engage in. Feedback, we are repeatedly told, is tremendously powerful and therefore teachers must do more of it. Certainly Hattie, the Sutton Trust and the EEF bandy about impressive effect sizes, but the evidence of flipping through a pupil’s exercise book suggests that the vast majority of what teachers write is ignored or misunderstood. Teachers’ feedback can certainly have a huge impact but it’s a mistake to believe that this impact is always positive. I written in detail about marking and the power of Directed Improvement Reflection Time.

What is a Rubric? Heidi Andrade Rubrics have become popular with teachers as a means of communicating expectations for an assignment, providing focused feedback on works in progress, and grading final products. Although educators tend to define the word “rubric” in slightly different ways, Heidi Andrade’s commonly accepted definition is a document that articulates the expectations for an assignment by listing the criteria, or what counts, and describing levels of quality from excellent to poor. Rubrics are often used to grade student work but they can serve another, more important, role as well: Rubrics can teach as well as evaluate. When used as part of a formative, student-centered approach to assessment, rubrics have the potential to help students develop understanding and skill, as well as make dependable judgments about the quality of their own work.

How Rubrics Provide Feedback I’d like to start with an assumption about rubrics. I believe that rubrics are tools designed to serve two purposes:They help a teacher assess student work consistently and clearly.They help provide feedback to students through setting expectations and evaluating performance.With these two goals in mind—assessment and feedback—I’d like to examine how rubrics need to be built and used to be able to serve those purposes. I recently wrote about the different kinds of rubrics, and I’d like to focus exclusively on analytic (rather than holistic) rubrics in this discussion.

Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding What strategy can double student learning gains? According to 250 empirical studies, the answer is formative assessment, defined by Bill Younglove as "the frequent, interactive checking of student progress and understanding in order to identify learning needs and adjust teaching appropriately." Unlike summative assessment, which evaluates student learning according to a benchmark, formative assessment monitors student understanding so that kids are always aware of their academic strengths and learning gaps. Meanwhile, teachers can improve the effectiveness of their instruction, re-teaching if necessary. "When the cook tastes the soup," writes Robert E. Stake, "that's formative; when the guests taste the soup, that's summative."

Grading, Assessment, or Feedback? assign credentials by saying students passed a course, achieved a goal, or mastered content. Grades also sort or rank students by performance, giving us the ability to discuss “B students” as a group or “above-average” students as a means of exclusion. They label performance based on arbitrary evaluative criteria. 5 Tips for a More Meaningful Rubric Sarah Wike Loyola , Upper School Spanish Teacher, Spanish Team Leader, and Technology Mentor in Charlotte, NC Posted 06/08/2015 12:26PM | Last Commented 07/06/2015 2:30PM Every educator feels pretty darn cool the first few times they grade students' work. De-grade your classroom with narrative feedback SmartBlogs Years ago, I stopped grading my students. This is shocking to most educators who wonder how assessment can be done without numbers and letters. The answer is surprisingly simple: I replace grades with narrative feedback. Renowned education professor and researcher Dylan Wiliam, who has studied feedback and grades for decades, recommends in his book “Embedded Formative Assessment” using narrative feedback in lieu of grades, rather than in addition to letters and numbers. Wiliam suggests that grades detract from the value of the feedback. The research in favor of feedback is undeniable, and it suggests that eliminating grades can revolutionize learning.

4 Easy Tips and Tricks for Creating Visually Engaging Rubrics Lisa Yokana recently shared a useful rubric in her post on "Creating an Authentic Maker Education Rubric." As this post was making the rounds on social media, Edutopia staff received a number of requests to distribute a modifiable version of her sample maker rubric that educators could adjust to the particulars of their own settings. Editable Maker Rubric

Peer Review Grades 9 – 12 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson And in Conclusion: Inquiring into Strategies for Writing Effective Conclusions While drafting a literary analysis essay (or another type of argument) of their own, students work in pairs to investigate advice for writing conclusions and to analyze conclusions of sample essays. Empowering Teachers With Tech-Friendly Formative Assessment Tools Formative assessment is an important part of effective instruction. Teachers can use observations, checklists, and quick quizzes to gather data that will inform their instruction. Formative assessment identifies areas where students are excelling and struggling so that teachers can best alter their instruction to meet the needs of all students.

Using Tech Tools to Provide Timely Feedback One of the most powerful moments in my teaching journey was the summer I immersed myself in feedback and checking for understanding. It forced me to ask myself what and if my students were actually learning. I learned the importance of the language I used. I also learned effective ways to track student progress toward learning goals that will inform the feedback I give students. While my effectiveness as a teacher has grown exponentially, I still have a lot to learn.

20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day 20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day by Saga Briggs The ultimate goal of teaching is understanding. Sample End Comments The following sample end comments correspond to the marginal comments listed in the previous section: You've done an excellent job combining all of what we've discussed in Unit 1 into a strong ARE. Your revisions, in particular, demonstrate your awareness of academic writing conventions and ability to apply them to your own writing. The final draft of your ARE is well-structured and clearly connected to Anyon's text. Focusing your essay on Anyon's progression from observations to ideas, you state clear responses to those ideas and support your responses with relevant evidence. In regard to that evidence, keep one suggestion in mind as you continue to write for academic contexts.

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